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Thread: A Night with Dr. Hans Keirstead

  1. #1

    A Night with Dr. Hans Keirstead

    A Night with Dr. Hans Keirstead
    Prominent Stem Cell Researcher to Speak in Santa Barbara




    Friday, June 4, 2010
    By Teisha Rowland (Contact



    Game-changing discoveries have always been met with resistance. This has been clearly shown by accomplishments achieved by prominent stem cell researcher Dr. Hans Keirstead. Keirstead is an associate professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology and co-director of the Sue Bill Gross Stem Cell Center at the Reeve-Irvine Research Center at the University of California, Irvine. Keirstead and his lab developed a method using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to treat spinal cord injuries and, in 2009, this treatment became the first-ever FDA-approved clinical trial using hESCs.

    On June 14, 2010, Keirstead will be giving a presentation at the Victoria Hall Theater in Santa Barbara on “Stem Cell Research and Its Application for Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury and Disease.” (View the event details here).

    During his PhD studies at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canadian-born Keirstead developed ground-breaking methods to regenerate damaged spinal cords. To understand how these methods work, it’s important to have an understanding of how the spinal cord normally functions. Two key groups of cells in the spinal cord are neurons, which transmit information, and oligodendrocytes, which act to protect the neurons and ensure that the information travels properly. (The latter are a type of glial cell, so named for being the “glue” of the nervous system). The main way oligodendrocytes carry out their supportive roles is by insulating neurons in a material called myelin—forming a myelin sheath around the neuron’s axon, a long protrusion from the neuron that conducts electrical impulses. This functions similarly to how an electrical wire must be insulated to work properly.

    However, when the spinal cord is injured, oligodendrocytes die en masse and consequently the neurons lose their protective myelin sheaths. Even many oligodendrocytes far from the site of impact can die, increasing the area of the spinal cord that has neurons without myelin sheaths. The absence of the myelin sheaths so greatly disrupts the flow of information across the neurons in the spinal cord that paralysis can result even when the neurons themselves are spared.

    read...

    http://www.independent.com/news/2010...ans-keirstead/

  2. #2
    Manouli, home run! This is valuable info and a move forward. Ties all the hold up with Geron etc. Hopefully they can get trials going and apply results to chronics. Thanks ever so much for your tenacity . Let's follow this carefully and use this as a topic going forward.

    keeping on

  3. #3

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by keeping on View Post
    Manouli, home run! This is valuable info and a move forward. Ties all the hold up with Geron etc. Hopefully they can get trials going and apply results to chronics. Thanks ever so much for your tenacity . Let's follow this carefully and use this as a topic going forward.

    keeping on
    we're going to walk again my friend is a matter of time, we feel it right?
    Last edited by manouli; 06-05-2010 at 11:05 PM.

  4. #4
    thats actually pretty scary for us chronics. if they can eliminate sci for acutes they will say sci is cured and they can just let the chronics die off. its like people who caught polio right before the vaccination was discovered. talk about bad timing.....

  5. #5
    Can I get an
    keep (rolling) Walking

    Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

  6. #6
    Keirstead and his lab developed a method using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to treat spinal cord injuries and, in 2009, this treatment became the first-ever FDA-approved clinical trial using hESCs.
    LOL! No it didn't. The FDA rescinded their approval.

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    Or maybe what they learn from the acute injuries can be applied to us chronic injuries. I don't think they'll forget us.

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    Senior Member KIM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lepups3 View Post
    Or maybe what they learn from the acute injuries can be applied to us chronic injuries. I don't think they'll forget us.
    That is what we are here for.

  9. #9
    Manouli, I'm with you and all; give us our chance.

    Later , keeping on

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by lepups3 View Post
    Or maybe what they learn from the acute injuries can be applied to us chronic injuries. I don't think they'll forget us.
    the article states that what they've already learned is that the injury needs to be treated early. i guess we all better hope theres something that they can learn that will be applicable to chronics but its apparent that the geron procedure is a acute procedure..

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