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Thread: how to pay caregivers

  1. #11
    Although it is NOT illegal, I do find it to be unethical. They are CAREGIVERS! Doesn't this mean that they CARE?

    If this has happened more than once I would take a look at the reason(s) behind it. Afterall, they do know that they signed up to be a caregiver. Therefore, they should know that someone needs them.

    Is it that they are getting higher paying offers?
    Are they being overworked?
    Is the condition of the person they are taking care of - too much to handle?

    I think if you find out why they are leaving you can then remedy the problem.

  2. #12
    Dennis, how many PCAs have you employed?

    The reality is that people who are seeking employment as PCAs are rarely from the part of our population who have a great record of stability, dependability, or great work habits. They are also not rocket scientists. If they did/were, they would already have jobs doing something else. You have to kiss a lot of frogs to get a prince!

    (KLD)

  3. #13
    I don't need a caregiver and can manage myself fine. I never even thought if some day I will need to hire someone. It will suck, because I already get bitchy at people who open doors for me lol.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Unconstruct View Post
    I don't need a caregiver and can manage myself fine. I never even thought if some day I will need to hire someone. It will suck, because I already get bitchy at people who open doors for me lol.
    I am glad you are managing for yourself. That will make a huge difference.
    We have to have aides. How I wish we did not.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by LindaT View Post
    I am glad you are managing for yourself. That will make a huge difference.
    We have to have aides. How I wish we did not.
    I have family that has MS and she is 70 something. My aunt Sally who I have learned a lot from. She is in a chair, needs help to get out of bed, but most everything else she still does herself...including the incontinence thing.

    It makes me feel better..I'm still strong and have years before I need to have assistance with the personal stuff. I feel for the SCI people..they are dropped into the worst of it from the start..everything. At least I can "learn as I go" so it's not to much a shock when the time comes for myself to need some real help.

    I figure if my aunt still cares for herself with MS at her age, then I should be fine for a long long time.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Unconstruct View Post
    I have family that has MS and she is 70 something. My aunt Sally who I have learned a lot from. She is in a chair, needs help to get out of bed, but most everything else she still does herself...including the incontinence thing.

    It makes me feel better..I'm still strong and have years before I need to have assistance with the personal stuff. I feel for the SCI people..they are dropped into the worst of it from the start..everything. At least I can "learn as I go" so it's not to much a shock when the time comes for myself to need some real help.

    I figure if my aunt still cares for herself with MS at her age, then I should be fine for a long long time.
    That is what I feel like sometimes. "dropped into the worst of it from the start." I can accept this happened, but why did it have to be SO bad?
    That is where I am at right now. I know everyone with SCI has struggles and our situation is not special. My spouse can barely shrug one of his shoulders and is on a vent at night with many other breathing/lung issues.
    He does not get any stronger and seems one set back after another. We had hoped to volunteer at the VA, but he never seems to reach that point.
    Sorry to carry on. That quote just rang so true to me.
    It has helped to meet others here that have similar injuries.
    While I am grateful this did not happen to him at a younger age, it seems like young people often do better. He never used a computer before and even with adaptive equipment has lost interest.
    PS-good for you Aunt Sally!

  7. #17
    You're pulling my heart strings lol... huggs.

    It was like the time my friend's doughter got her license and the second night with it she crashed off the road and messed herself up bad. She became an infant again..lots of brain damage. She was 16 and very pretty..breaks my friggin heart. She's 25 now I believe and other than being potty trained again and speaking pretty good, she is still not able to be by herself. That family has gone through so much that I can feel the pain myself.

    They too were dropped straight into it in a matter of hours.

    I guess with MS I can thank that while mine is progressive, I have time to adjust to it..so does my family. I also thank that I can still walk well with my cane, am not incontinent for the most part, and not brain damaged. I just have stupid legs that each have their own minds lmao.

    I don't know what else to say, but huggs...

  8. #18
    Thanks for the hugggs. As the song by REM goes.........Everbody Hurts.
    I never assume anyone else's is better or worse.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Dennis, how many PCAs have you employed?
    3 - 2 of which turned out to be great but the 1st one will not get a recommendation from me!

    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    The reality is that people who are seeking employment as PCAs are rarely from the part of our population who have a great record of stability, dependability, or great work habits. They are also not rocket scientists. If they did/were, they would already have jobs doing something else. You have to kiss a lot of frogs to get a prince!
    Sounds like you know what you're talking about but you leave no recommendation or advice except to say those of us that need a PCA for our loved ones are doomed.

    Once again I state:
    If this has happened more than once I would take a look at the reason(s) behind it.

    Is it that they are getting higher paying offers?
    Are they being overworked?
    Is the condition of the person they are taking care of - too much to handle?

    I think if you find out why they are leaving you can then remedy the problem.

    My hope is that you can minimize the number of frogs you have to kiss.

  10. #20
    I would suggest you read some of the extensive and previous discussions about this on this forum. I do hire PCAs for my mother, and have for the last 10 years. I have fired 3 out of 10. One PCA has stayed with her for 10 years now. Much of it is the luck of the draw...you can only glean so much information from an interview, background check, and checking previous employment references. Most important is good supervision as the person is starting the job, regular supervision meetings, not letting problems go unaddressed, and taking action when it appears that the person is not going to be able to correct behavior that you find unacceptable.

    These people are not professionals. They have no formal training, either in ethics or health care. They are usually minimally educated. If you can afford to hire licensed people, more power to you, but frankly those who are looking for PCA wages and work conditions who are licensed are often those who have been fired for incompetence from regular jobs. In addition, they still don't know anything about in-home caregiving or SCI, and as a professional often don't want to take direction from the employer. As a nurse, I can say, trained nurses are usually too bossy.

    (KLD)

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