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Thread: Ok, finally got what I could afford...

  1. #1

    Ok, finally got what I could afford...


    I couldn't afford much, but I finally made my oldest boy happy by ordering the blackberry storm. He wanted a droid, until I showed him the price & glared at him with my 'are you f--ing nuts?' look, then he said "The storm is cool, too." I would certainly hope so! Going from $20 every 3 months for 2 lines to the chunk of change for the storms is nuts. The little guy wants one, but I think I'll let him have my flip phone, if any. He's only 9 & tends to 'forget' things easily.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    "The happiest of people don't necessarily have the best of everything; They just make the most of everything they have."

  3. #3
    He is a lucky nine-year-old boy.
    The test of success is not what you do when you are on top. Success is how high you bounce when you hit the bottom
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  4. #4
    you bought a smartphone to make your kid happy when financially it didn't make sense to you?

    should've bought a lawnmower & put that boy to work... let him buy his own phone & learn about money.

  5. #5
    The little guy wants one, but I think I'll let him have my flip phone, if any. He's only 9 & tends to 'forget' things easily.
    My read: I think he is getting the flip phone and not the smart phone.
    The test of success is not what you do when you are on top. Success is how high you bounce when you hit the bottom
    --General George Patton

    Complex problems need to be solved collectively.
    ––Paul Nussbaum
    usc87.blogspot.com

  6. #6
    Coleen, I'm glad you were able to give your son something he wanted and that was affordable. It can be a lesson in responsibility for him.
    My kids are adults and we did not have cell phones back then so I am not sure what I would have done. A lot of kids now sure seem to have them.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Robynbird569's Avatar
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    My daughter has been on me to get her a cell phone, (shes 11) and I refuse to. I hear the same ole same ole, "but everyone has one but me". I asked her this, "You got to school and then you come home, and if you go anywhere, I am with you, so tell me, why do you need one?" Her response, "So I can sit in my room and talk to my friends" So I hand her the house phone.


    Stay safe my son. See you around thanksgiving!

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Coleen View Post

    I couldn't afford much, but I finally made my oldest boy happy by ordering the blackberry storm. He wanted a droid, until I showed him the price & glared at him with my 'are you f--ing nuts?' look, then he said "The storm is cool, too." I would certainly hope so! Going from $20 every 3 months for 2 lines to the chunk of change for the storms is nuts. The little guy wants one, but I think I'll let him have my flip phone, if any. He's only 9 & tends to 'forget' things easily.
    Coleen, thank you for giving me the opportunity to rant. lol

    A few years ago, technophobia or fear of technology was a major social concern. If you feared technology and did not learn to cope, you were destined to become an anachronism and drain on the economy. Or so "they" said. Technophobia has not gone away, but it has been far outdistanced by technomania. Symptoms include, abnormal excitability, exaggerated feelings of well-being, over reliance on, and excessive activity relating to technology. This disorder seems to have exploded in the U.S. There are now advanced cases who have forgotten their basic language and speak in a distinctive dialect described as "technobabble."

    Why the concern? This malady is consuming us, and is positioned to bring down our society. In case you did not know it, if you give your kid or friend a birthday, Christmas or other gift these days, it better be high tech or it will suck. If Jesus were born this year, he would want something hi tech. Myrrh and frankincense stink. Gold would be okay, but a gift certificate from Best Buy would be better.

    Back to bringing us down: Look what technology is doing to our kids. With almost total immersion in e-games, personal entertainment systems, cyberspace, cell phone use, etc., they are becoming oblivious to the world around them. I recently saw two pre-teens get in the back of the family minivan, and before they got to the end of the driveway, one was immersed in e-gaming or text messaging, and the other was using a remote that controlled the DVD player. Kids don’t look out the car windows any more. I’ll bet these two do not know the name of the next street or that there is a service station a few blocks away. Geographers annually express their concern when, through their annual survey, they find that the majority of kids do not know where countries like Afghanistan and Iraq are. I'll bet if they asked a few questions about the kids’ surrounding neighborhood, they would become totally depressed. No more learning states by checking license plates, or learning to count roadkill. Roadkill has always been a great conversation starter for kids: What kind of animal is it, how did it get hit, why are those birds around it, will it go to heaven? It has also served as an introduction to the lethality of cars. Forget about learning about architecture, community living conditions, etc.

    This is truly a new era in the history of man. We now have toys that are smarter than the kids, and maybe even us. Past generations always used toys as aids when teaching the kids. Now we give them toys that take over the teaching job. Read’n, right’n rithmatic, and more. Instead of holding the kids on their lap and reading to them, parents can go play with their own hi-tech toys. It is a shame that kids then have to go online to find someone who will give them a little attention, which they hunger for. Finally, I am concerned that kids are becoming so immersed in this two dimensional LCD screen world that they may lose their 3-D vision. Think about it: Obese kids with no depth perception, repetitive stress syndrome at age eight, no bonding with their parents, and oblivious to the world around them.

    It’s not only the kids. Adults are going down too. Cell phone and automobile hi-tech distractions are contributing to more dangerous highways and streets. This year, the same adults who mortgaged the house to buy a mammoth flat screen HDTV with surround sound last year because TV was not worth viewing without it, have to have a super cell phone that enables them to get streamed TV programs on a 1 inch squint screen and tin-ear speaker. Go figure. I could write volumes about the public nuisance cell phones have become, but others have documented the plague. I recently saw where some restaurants and bars are starting to put in quiet rooms in which people can sequester themselves to talk on a cell phone. I’m old enough to remember phone booths...what goes around comes around. The latest must is text messaging. Although this seems to be mostly a kid fad, it is used by adults to secretly call 911everytime they are kidnapped. If you have ever tried it, you quickly realize that it is one of the most inefficient means of communication around. I don’t think that is what Alexander Graham Bell had in mind when he spent his lifetime inventing the phone. Having been a ham radio operator, I can tell you that Morse code is much faster. If adults, including parents, were to put the $ they throw at these technology wonders in a retirement or college tuition fund, they would all be much further ahead. When it comes to buying hi-tech gear, we are usually talking about serious money. If these hi-tech musts were a one-shot purchase that would be bad enough. However, many such as cell phones and iPods, tie users into a lifetime of monthly charges or other fees. They are real money vacuum sweepers for the service companies. I understand that ED has taken on a new meaning…electronics debt. It really sneaks up on you.

    Business is suffering too. Recent reports indicate that Americans are working more and enjoying it less. And even worse, productivity is not increasing at the same pace as time on the job. Businesses get sucked in by the myth that technology increases productivity. Consider this: A few years ago, an office assistant sat down to a sticky keyed Underwood typewriter and in a couple minutes, banged out a one-sentence announcement about the office Christmas party. Nowadays, the person spends an hour or more perusing several CDs of clipart to give it just the right touch. Add to this a little surfing time, time sorting e-mail and weeding out spam, a lot of time twiddling thumbs while waiting for the network to be fixed and you have a half day consumed by the technology. Two page reports have now expanded to four pages because you can insert graphs, tables, and smiley faces. They are not needed, but they look impressive. Why is this happening? Mostly because some junior executive wanted to make sure the business appeared progressive or "cutting edge." Once the company spends big bucks on the hardware and software, employees are given the message that they better use it. Find something to do with it...anything, just use it so it looks like we are getting our money’s worth.


    And then there is PowerPoint. For Microsoft it was a winner, but for those who have to sit through a 1 hour presentation to get a 1 minute message, it is computer imposed hell. Its use has now gone beyond business walls and has taken over as the meeting media of choice. There is nothing worse than going to a civic group luncheon to learn about community woes, and finding yourself eating cold chicken fricassee while watching PowerPoint Puke. You don’t have stomach left for the petrified apple pie. Do you think that Martin Luther King’s "I have a Dream" speech would be part of history if he did it with a PowerPoint presentation? I think not. If you want to fire me up, give me someone with good oratorical skills rather than a quick finger on the remote control.


    Don’t get me wrong. Technology can be a godsend when used appropriately and sensibly. This rant may sound hypocritical when I acknowledge having spent a part of my professional life doing technology R & D. However, I have been spared from catching the highly infectious technomania. I guess I am fortunate to have an effective "skepticism" gene. All I can say is, " think before you buy this stuff." If you saved an average of $50 a month of hi-tech costs and invested it at a paltry return rate of 5%, in 30 years you would have approximately $42,000.

    God bless America and save us from high tech gluttony!
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  9. #9
    Senior Member Wesley's Avatar
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    amen
    I can't believe how much people are spending on monthly services.
    We had a subdivision go in next to our farm and i dreaded the having folks trespassing in crops. No need to worry, all the kids stay indoors. Creeks, open fields and woods right behind the house and no interest at all. the only way you know they have kids in the unused play equipment in the backyard.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Pruett View Post
    should've bought a lawnmower & put that boy to work... let him buy his own phone & learn about money.
    I'm with Scott. A lawn mower would have been great or a loaned, finite amount of money so your son could set up his first lemonaid stand.

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