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Thread: Homeschooling children

  1. #11
    Hi Diamond,

    I guess I'm in the minority here. I do not believe that homeschooling is a good thing. My ex wife wanted to try it, but I was dead against it for a number of reason. I know every situation is different, but I truly believe that kids who are being schooled at home really miss out on the "non-textbook" part of school life.

    Those that do school at home have had some success I know, but remember that stats and numbers can be made out to whatever you want. I just think that those who are educators are far better trained that we as parents in the education process.

    I know some schools are really heading down hill and that is a crime. Plus, they don't make things easy for kids with a disability either. But, there are schools that are doing very well and go out of their way to help those kids with special needs.

    Those are just my thoughts. I argued with my ex wife many hours about it, but she finally agreed that it probably wasn't the best thing. By the way, my son is mildly autistic.

    Indy

  2. #12
    Indy I appreciate your input. However, the part of school life I WANT her to miss out on is the non-textbook part.

    Schools here are horrendous at best. A very local school "Jonesboro High" was in the news shortly after the shootings and killings in Colorado several years ago because a student brought a gun and shot it. My step-son is a victim of gang activity here. There is compromise. I will trade my daughter's exposure to "society" and all that entails for her life any day of the week and I really feel that's what it's come down to. If we lived in some nice rural area that would be great, I'd leave her in the public school system, but we don't so I have to do what's best for her and that's keep her safe, as safe as I can anyway.

    Thanks for your input though.

    Jewel

  3. #13
    .

    [This message was edited by Shaun on 02-04-05 at 01:33 PM.]

  4. #14
    If thats what she wants and your cool with it then why not...BUT...speaking for myself,some of the most important learning and preparation for life is learned on the playground and at recess and that sort of thing.There are a lot of things that are learned at schools that dont come from the books...but then again guns and school shootings are not an issue up here,bullies are our big problem..

    ~~I knew a lady who came from Duluth,bit by a dog with a rabid tooth,she went to her grave just a little to soon and flew away howlin on the yellow moon~~

  5. #15
    Indy said, "Those that do school at home have had some success I know, but remember that stats and numbers can be made out to whatever you want. I just think that those who are educators are far better trained that we as parents in the education process."

    It's sad to me that the so-called educators out there have parents convinced that they are not smart enough to teach their own children.
    Have you seen this article? Teachers consistently Fail Basic Skills Test
    I happened to have passed the Basic Skills test!
    I also love to hear things like this: Hollywood couple WILL and JADA PINKETT SMITH have decided to homeschool their children, because they're unimpressed with America's educational system. Jada tells ESSENCE magazine, "(They are homeschooled) for
    flexibility, so they can stay with us when we travel, and also because the school system in this country - public and private is
    designed for the industrial age.

    "We're in a technological age. We don't want our kids to memorize. We want them to learn."

    I'm with you, Jewel. I'm glad they're missing the trash they would get at recess.

    Shannon
    C6/7 incomplete

    [This message was edited by 30something on 02-04-05 at 11:19 PM.]

    [This message was edited by 30something on 02-07-05 at 03:08 PM.]

  6. #16
    Originally posted by Indy 1:

    Hi Diamond,

    I guess I'm in the minority here. I do not believe that homeschooling is a good thing. My ex wife wanted to try it, but I was dead against it for a number of reason. I know every situation is different, but I truly believe that kids who are being schooled at home really miss out on the "non-textbook" part of school life.

    Those that do school at home have had some success I know, but remember that stats and numbers can be made out to whatever you want. I just think that those who are educators are far better trained that we as parents in the education process.

    I know some schools are really heading down hill and that is a crime. Plus, they don't make things easy for kids with a disability either. But, there are schools that are doing very well and go out of their way to help those kids with special needs.

    Those are just my thoughts. I argued with my ex wife many hours about it, but she finally agreed that it probably wasn't the best thing. By the way, my son is mildly autistic.

    Indy
    Please forgive me, but that sickens me to the core. Your (ex)wife felt the need to homeschool your child and you beat her down to the point that she lost confidence to do the most natural thing any parent should do "teach their children"........ for thousands of years it has been parents teaching their children, in a non-threatening environment, and yet have we evolved to the point that we believe strangers are better capable to show love and give instruction (individually to our children)? no I think not!

    The greatest reward I have found with my children, has been homeschooling.

    When they don't understand, not a problem we stop we explore the answers and we learn together. When they understand we move on, not hindered by an entire class of others....
    Our school system was set up, for the poor, to teach them the basic skills that they would need to work in our factories, mills, and other such basic jobs.......now they are even failing that task **don't believe me? go to Mcdonalds and cover the pictured keyboard over and see if the child has been given the skills to add*........ so yes if you want your child to know just enough to "make it" then send him into the public / private schools ... there will always be a need for McDonalds workers..........

    and college? I did that too, and are we taught to think? no, endurance and compliance with the teacher's orders, these are the things that give us our degrees.

    The united states' children are falling behind, not because we don't have all the facts, no we have more than enough information, the reason we are falling behind is the fact that we have not given them the skills to think for themselves.

    My children are very "well adjusted" they are smart, articulate, and have many life skills that children twice their age don't have.

    It is amazing to me to see how much they can learn. They are sponges that want to learn and learn why! Don't take that from your children........... The one thing any child wants is you, you are their guide, you are their mentor, you are their hero.....let them have that extra time with you, especially during their fragile developmental years.

    1 more thing, don't listen to the arguement "what about sociallization" Join your local homeschool group, and you will soon have more than enough events to go to.... our small town has several groups the largest has over 150 families, and most any week there are 3-4 events going on, such as skating, bowling, park play days,specialized classes,field trips.....etc. We even went on a carnival cruise for a week....... a boat full of children (scary huh?), nope I meet some of the most well behaved and intelligent children.

    sorry for the long post, but you asked for those who knew something about it, and it seemed like those weren't the responses you were getting



    =============================
    "Whereas Reps are arrogantly self-assured, which they feel justifies mean-spiritedness and overall rude behavior.

    You are a prime example of that."--Faye--

  7. #17
    Jewel,

    I did not choose homeschooling as the way to go with my kids. They did not want it, and would have hated it. I believe however, that each child and each family are different. I learned many years ago that the ideology is not that important. If you think that your heart is in this for your daughter..then go for it. Perhaps Melissa needs a year at home with you regardless. I would look at it as an experiment, with requirements for everyone involved. If it works out then you are going to win, and if it does not then you know you gave the effort on her behalf and that is its own form of winning. I always thought homeschooling was a really cock-eyed thing to do, but my friend has homeschooled all 6 of her kids with the goal of them entering the 9th grade in public high school so that they would be able to enjoy peer group activities and sports and all that their taxes are paid for them to have. These are 6 very different and individual children..all delightful in their own ways. The two older ones are at the top of their classes in high school, and college options are wide open for both. I think the thing that filled the gaps for them was the homeschool co-op that they were founders of, and a part of for so long. This is a group of homeschoolers who have organized classes and activities as a group that rival and exceed those of the ones offered by our public school system. There were times when my kids had asked to get out of their school so they could attend a homeschool co-op sponsored educational event. It is entirely do-able, if you are able to network yourself with others who are involved in it, and take advantage of the success of others in order to ensure the success of Melissa. I have found that the people who are a part of the co-ops are the most successful at this huge undertaking. Oddly, I still look at it thinking its a bit cock-eyed to me, but I cannot argue with the success and delightful young men and women some of these local people are turning out. What I do know is that homeschool is their life...it consumes them into all areas of activity. Inasmuch as I am not into it for me, I cannot argue with the results I have seen ...the successes certainly have outweighed any observed failures. As with any educational choice, it is we as parents who retain the burden of responsibility for the result of whatever choice we make for our children. The public school is not now nor was it ever designed to take the place of active and interactive parenting.

    I am fortunate to live in a county that has schools that are earning awards and ratings as some of the nations best. That is great, the education is great and burden on us is still just as great.

    You do what is best for you and your family...that is the whole point of having the rights and freedoms we have in this country. Get hooked up with other homeschoolers, do not skimp on the curriculum you purchase, until you are well versed and highly connected in the homeschool world. I wish you and Melissa all the best in this endeavor, and remember, though he remain nameless here...Daddy is not excluded here either. Sorry I wrote a book...should have just said....good luck with whatever you decide. I wish you well..

    Mary

    "The Main thing in life, is keeping the Main thing the main thing...." mainlymary aka 1fine rn

  8. #18
    Thank you Hub, that was an awesome post and very true IMO. I'm so happy to hear from someone that speaks from experience.

    I have always believed that our educational system does not teach us to think for ourselves but rather to think whatever is taught.

    I remember an experience in school where my algebra teacher told us a problem could not be solved in less than 9 steps. I went home and worked on the problem and was able to find an equation that solved the problem in 5 steps. I tested it and it worked and I thought the teacher would be so proud of me. She wasn't, she was angry. She just wanted us to do it as she said, not think about it past the point that she specified. That was a shock but a very important lesson.

    Thank you Shannon, and Mary for your input as well. Everyone may not agree with the decision but it is what's best for us right now, I don't see that changing.

    We will get involved with other's in this endeavor, certainly there is much to be learned and friends to make, she won't be missing out on anything.

    Thanks for the input everyone.

    Jewel

  9. #19
    Diamond,

    I hope it really goes well for you. I am sorry that public school is not working for Melissa. Sometimes it just does not mix well for the student in the system they are living in. I do not think its the fault of the American Public School system though. My first training was as a teacher for K-6 Home Economics.Each system is run differently according to the thinking style and personality of the leadership currently in charge. My mom was a teacher her whole working life as is my brother. What we have learned is that all systems are put into place as the resources we are to use in order to get where we want to go...some work and some don't. I believe you are making a good decision for Melissa now because she wants it, and hopefully that makes you want it too. You are obviously able to think "outside the box", and should also know that praise and encouragement will usually only come from those who are similar thinkers. My mom, a wonderful high school math teacher, would have gotten you on skirting the rules on that problem too. On the other hand..I would have thought that was great and tried it myself. Just imagine how my mom and I got along as we approached my creative view of education...well...viva la difference!!! I hope you keep us up on how it is going, and it is so great that there are homeschooling members here that can give you the benefits of their experience.

    Mary

    "The Main thing in life, is keeping the Main thing the main thing...." mainlymary aka 1fine rn

  10. #20
    Hi Jewel,

    I hope you didn't think I was disagreeing with you. I quoted Indy in my last post and was disagreeing with him!

    Mary,

    I had a few really good, caring teachers in my day as well. The problem is that they (good teachers) are becoming the exception, not the norm. And while the good teachers try to teach, they cannot for struggling to just keep order in the classroom.

    Shannon
    C6/7 incomplete

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