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Thread: Intermittent Catheterization C6C7

  1. #1

    Intermittent Catheterization C6C7

    My husband, currently still in rehab but only til May 19th is using IC. The nurses or I have to do this for him every 4 hours unless he is in the hospital bed and everything is set up for him just so. When he is in the chair it is too difficult for him. My question is, how long has it taken other men with his level of injury (C6C7) to do this independantly while in a chair? Also, we don't have an adjustable bed at home, so will I always have to set my alarm clock for every 4 hours to cath him through the night or will he be able to do this on his own eventually?
    I know God will not give me anything I can't handle. I just wish that He didn't trust me so much. - Mother Teresa

  2. #2
    Senior Member StevieP's Avatar
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    I have a friend who is C6-C7 and he wears a leg bag with an super-pubic catheter so all he has to do is to drain the bag. He will have a greater chance of bladder cancer and his bladder will eventually shrink to the size of a peanut. At night he hooks the catheter up to a night bag so he can sleep the whole night and not have to wake up.

    This is just what I know of, I am not a quad I am a para. I would ask more questions of the doctors and nurses at the rehab.

    Stevie P

  3. #3
    Reflex voiding may not be possible of safe for someone so recently injured. We would consider an indwelling catheter as an option if he did not have the potential to cath himself, but he should be able to do this very soon with work. Is he very obese? That would make it more difficult.

    It is rare that we are not able to get our males with either a C6 or C7 SCI independent in clean self intermittent catheterization. Is he working with both a rehabilitation nurse and OT on learning how to do this? What type of catheter is he trying to use?

    Does he have a pant holder/Betty hook to make it easier in his chair? Have you considered at least temporarily getting a full-electric hospital bed for when he first comes home to make self cath in bed easier?

    With a properly adjusted cath and fluid schedule, he should be able to go 6 hours at night between caths, and do them every 4 hours during the day.

    Where is he doing his rehab? Do they really have a lot of SCI experience?

    (KLD)

  4. #4
    Reflex voiding may not be possible of safe for someone so recently injured. We would consider an indwelling catheter as an option if he did not have the potential to cath himself, but he should be able to do this very soon with work. Is he very obese? That would make it more difficult.

    He is a pretty big guy, I wouldn't say obese, but he is about 240lbs and his stomach unfortunately is the problem when he is in the chair. I have to pull his legs out a bit to cath him in the chair.

    It is rare that we are not able to get our males with either a C6 or C7 SCI independent in clean self intermittent catheterization. Is he working with both a rehabilitation nurse and OT on learning how to do this? What type of catheter is he trying to use?

    They were trying to teach him for a while but he has only been able to do it propped up in bed, again because of his stomach being in the way when he is in the chair, and also because he can't get his waistband to hook around the clothes hanger we use as a pants holder. He is using a 16" 14FR straight catheter.

    Does he have a pant holder/Betty hook to make it easier in his chair? Have you considered at least temporarily getting a full-electric hospital bed for when he first comes home to make self cath in bed easier?

    We just use a clothes hanger as a pants holder, what is a Betty hook? No insurance coverage for a hospital bed at home. Private Disability Insurance of $2000/month will finally start coming in soon,, but with a family of 5, we have no extra money to buy/rent a hospital bed. Our house is definitely too small anyway, I had to push our bed almost against the wall in our room so he can get in.

    With a properly adjusted cath and fluid schedule, he should be able to go 6 hours at night between caths, and do them every 4 hours during the day.

    He has been trying to go 6 hours at night between caths. Sometimes he is OK and other times he wakes up sweaty after about 4 hours. I guess this will just take more effort regulating fluid intake.

    Where is he doing his rehab? Do they really have a lot of SCI experience?

    He is in Hamilton ON, Regional Rehabilitation Centre right now, they have a special SCI/Amputee Ward.
    I know God will not give me anything I can't handle. I just wish that He didn't trust me so much. - Mother Teresa

  5. #5
    My husband uses this pant holder. Easy to use and very helpful. Much better than a hanger.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Rrrrronnn's Avatar
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    Regarding the bed, I have a platform bed with a headboard. I keep two pillows up against it so I can prop up on my elbows, wiggle my way back up against the board, and now my head is up high enough to see my particulars and cath myself. I have a latex mattress with a padded mattress cover. Firm enough to move around on, soft enough to minimize pressure.
    .
    "If ya don't have it in the hips, ya better have it in the lips..." ~ Charlie - Villa Dulce

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by StevieP View Post
    I have a friend who is C6-C7 and he wears a leg bag with an super-pubic catheter so all he has to do is to drain the bag. He will have a greater chance of bladder cancer and his bladder will eventually shrink to the size of a peanut. At night he hooks the catheter up to a night bag so he can sleep the whole night and not have to wake up.

    This is just what I know of, I am not a quad I am a para. I would ask more questions of the doctors and nurses at the rehab.

    Stevie P
    I'm a C-6/7 quad also and eventually chose the super-pubic catheter route because it simply made life so much easier. Cathing myself was a pain in the ass and emptying a leg bag is so simple.

  8. #8
    i'm a C-7 quad who figured out w/in the 1st year that cathing was NOT for me. i got an SP tube and couldn't begin to tell u about how much freedom it has given me, not to mention how much uninterrupted sleep. that was 24 years ago. No waking up in the middle of the night, no having to hassle with cathing myself every 4 hours while going out with friends or on a date or plane or anywhere, no worrying about having someone help me cath. It was an easy decision for me.

    Another good tip is to really start watching what you eat. The more weight you lose, the easier it is to transfer, dress, get around, etc. Every 10 lbs you lose makes life 10X easier.
    Last edited by wheelz99; 05-15-2010 at 04:47 PM.

  9. #9
    i'm a c6/c7 when im in my chair i take my feet put them on the floor skoot forward so i can get tp my fly and i put key rings on all my zippers so i just hook my thumb in it and pull down and the do a cath. in bed i just roll on to my side pull my shorts down grab a cath and a piss jug and go to town. it all takes time to figure out what works for you and how to do it.

  10. #10
    wheelz99 nailed it. Go suprapubic. You won't regret it and you'll get some sleep.

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