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Thread: More stem cell lines are approved for federal funding, NIH says

  1. #1

    More stem cell lines are approved for federal funding, NIH says

    More stem cell lines are approved for federal funding, NIH says
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    By Rob Stein
    Tuesday, April 27, 2010; 4:04 PM

    The National Institutes of Health will announce Tuesday that four additional lines of human embryonic stem cells are now eligible for federal funding, including the most widely used line.

    The NIH's approval of the lines should alleviate mounting concerns among some supporters of stem-cell research that the Obama administration was hindering research.

    "Many people who had been working on these lines, and concerned about whether they would be able to continue to work with these lines, will now be reassured that their research can now go forward," NIH Director Francis Collins said in an interview in which he disclosed the decision. The federal research agency was to formally announce the determination later in the day.

    "This is fantastic news," said Charles Murry, a professor of pathology and bioengineering at the University of Washington in Seattle. His research had been in limbo, awaiting government approval of one of the lines. "Students who were facing the prospects of having to repeat years of work with new lines will now be able to complete their projects as planned. . . . My hat is off to the scientists and public servants who pushed hard to make this happen. It is a good day for science."



    more....

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...l?hpid=topnews

  2. #2
    any new funding for the new lines?

  3. #3
    At least there doing something; I think and hope it's going to be a good year.
    Thanks man;

    Tony

  4. #4
    13 additional stem cell lines eligible for federal funding, NIH says


    By Rob Stein
    Wednesday, April 28, 2010

    The National Institutes of Health announced Tuesday that 13 additional lines of human embryonic stem cells are eligible for federal funding, including the most widely used line.

    The NIH's approval of the lines should alleviate mounting concerns among some supporters of stem cell research that the Obama administration was hindering the work.

    "Many people who had been working on these lines, and concerned about whether they would be able to continue to work with these lines, will now be reassured that their research can now go forward," NIH Director Francis S. Collins said Tuesday.

    more...

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...=moreheadlines

  5. #5
    I am glad that this occurred. According to the Washington Post article, within this group of 14 approved stem cell lines are H7, H9, H13 and H14. These are four lines from the original Wisconsin lines reported in 1997. H9 is particularly important because this is the most studied of the original Wisconsin lines. It was shocking and unacceptable that NIH had not approved these lines earlier because these were amongst the 21 "presidential" lines that had been approved and studied by NIH from 2001 to 2009. By the way, NIH approved the H1 line on January 29, 2010. This is the line from which the oligodendroglial precursors to be used by Geron in their spinal cord injury clinical trial.

    Many people, including myself, could not understand why the NIH did not approve all the Presidential lines. After all NIH has been funding research on dozens of other human cell lines, such as HELA and other tumor cells, that have never received the kind of detailed informed consent that are now being retroactively required for embryonic stem cells. So, now there are 64 lines in the NIH registry.

    http://grants.nih.gov/stem_cells/registry/current.htm

    Wise.

  6. #6
    NIH Re-Approves Four Wisconsin Stem Cell Lines Including WiCell's H9
    April 28, 2010

    By a GenomeWeb staff reporter

    NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) — The National Institutes of Health has re-approved for ongoing use in federally-funded research the H9 (WA09) human embryonic stem cell line of the WiCell Research Institute, as well as three other original "Wisconsin" lines: H7 (WA07), H13 (WA13), and H14 (WA14).

    All four lines were discovered in 1998 in James Thomson's laboratory at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and were allowed for use in federal research projects by the administration of George W. Bush in its 2001 hESC directive, repealed by President Obama last year.

    read...

    http://www.genomeweb.com/nih-re-appr...ing-wicells-h9

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