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Thread: First pressure sore.

  1. #11
    Bulk up on lean protein like chicken and turkey as part of your meals.

    There are tons of protein supplement products out on the market -- if you don't want to do the protein powders from health food stores (which can be gross, even when mixed with flavored stuff), look for Atkins Diet products. They make snack bars and shakes that are all very high in protein and don't taste bad at all, but can be a little pricey. Watch your calories with the Atkins stuff too -- you can pack in a lot of calories from them without realizing it.

    Ensure also makes a high protein shake, but they seem to average about 12 g per while the Atkins average 15 g per.
    It is easier to find men who will volunteer to die, than to find those who are willing to endure pain with patience.

    ~Julius Caesar


  2. #12
    I don't know how much protein you should be getting or if this is enough, but I drink Special K protein shakes in chocolate flavor. They just taste like chocolate milk. They are by the slim fast at the store. Maybe there is something better, but if this would be good for you I think they taste good! I just checked the Special K has 10g of protein.

    Good luck & I'm glad its not on your back and have to be put on bedrest!
    Last edited by gurly2356; 04-20-2010 at 11:17 AM. Reason: add 10g
    Life is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get.

  3. #13
    I almost never disagree with Eileen, but...

    Putting on your shoes before this sore is healed is not a good idea, nor is using any type of "donut" to keep pressure off of a sore. The latter actually ends up restricting blood flow to the wound, which slows healing.

    I'm afraid that until the sore closes, you're Shoeless Joe.

    To keep it off of your foot rest, I'm wondering if an air-filled heel protector would allow you to keep your heel down while elevating your toes?
    It is easier to find men who will volunteer to die, than to find those who are willing to endure pain with patience.

    ~Julius Caesar


  4. #14
    Hi,

    Usually the white ring around the sore means it is getting "macerated" or too moist on the good surrounding tissue. Try washing with the salt water but not soaking it and apply the neosporin in small amt to the sore only avoiding the surrounding tissues and cover with dry gauze or bandaid. See if that improves the sore. If it worsens, develops increased redness, drainage,an odor or fever, please contact your clinician.

    AAD

  5. #15
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    Going to get some of the Special K protein shakes drinks today. Thanks for that suggestion gurly. Your right if I had to have a sore I am glad it is on my foot staying in bed would be a nightmare.

    I might have gotten wild with the neosporin last night so will try and make sure it is just on the open sore today. Will keep the surrounding skin dry. If it gets worse looking I will contact my doctor again.

    I don't like my foot dangling off the foot pedal like this and trying really hard not to put more pressure on other parts of the foot. That seems to be the problem you move pressure off one area just to put more pressure on another area.

    Right now I am wearing a ballerina type slipper that is way too big for my foot just to keep the dogs from licking my bare feet, they love bare feet.The slipper is not putting any pressure on the sore but keeps the dogs at bay.
    A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. ~Winston Churchill

  6. #16
    Just a quick look through my pantry.

    Protein:
    One egg= 6 grams
    Tuna= 11 grams per serving
    Ensure High Protein= 12 grams
    Beef jerky= 12 grams per serving
    Peanut butter= 7 grams per serving
    Aerodynamically, the bumble bee shouldn't be able to fly, but the bumble bee doesn't know that, so it goes on flying anyways--Mary Kay Ash

  7. #17
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    I am once again fighting one on my ankle too.

    Silvadene creme is a prescription that your doctor should have given you. Does he have experience with SCI?

    As for the shoes, bandaid makes a blister pad that I have used off and on over the years. If the blister pad doesn't stay intact, it is a friction sore. I usually just get rid of the shoes if I can't pad them enough to keep red spots from developing.

    There are also numerous gel foam stuff that you can use to take the pressure off the spot too.

    You need to try to figure out where the pressure is coming from and pad that area.

    My sore is from friction and a brace that is fit too tightly. The doctor has debrided it a couple of times and callous keeps forming over it because of the friction. Alas, it is not going to close until I get new braces and that takes more time. I just got these darn things six months ago too and they can't be modified
    T12-L2; Burst fracture L1: Incomplete walking with AFO's and cane since 1989

    My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am. ~Author Unknown

  8. #18
    Senior Member smokey's Avatar
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    What is the proper amount of protein someone should take in if they are trying to promote healing of a skin or tissue sore? And also, isn't Aquacel AG and Duoderm a good combo to place over a superficial sore?

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by thehipcrip View Post
    I almost never disagree with Eileen, but...

    Putting on your shoes before this sore is healed is not a good idea, nor is using any type of "donut" to keep pressure off of a sore. The latter actually ends up restricting blood flow to the wound, which slows healing.

    I'm afraid that until the sore closes, you're Shoeless Joe.

    To keep it off of your foot rest, I'm wondering if an air-filled heel protector would allow you to keep your heel down while elevating your toes?
    Actually, I agree with you HipCrip, but also need to confess I get a lot worried about shoeless feet sticking off a footpedal. I don't even wear sandals because I end up banging the front of my feet going through doors and such, or even just turning in tight spaces, so I err for the relative safety of shoes even if the healing itself might be faster without them, assuming the person can somehow avoid the toe crunching barefoot.

  10. #20
    Senior Member wtf's Avatar
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    my sore was on top of the toe, I was concerned because it was near bone but thankfully it wasn't too deep or very big (smaller than an eraserhead). My doctor gave me the silvadene cream, it took about 3 weeks for it to heal. I haven't had a problem since, I'm also wearing open toe shoes year-round so I can straighten out my toes - 2 of my toes curled under which seem to have been the reason for developing a sore.

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