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Thread: Feelings toward disabled parents-study

  1. #1

    Feelings toward disabled parents-study

    From the University of Haifa, Israel:
    "The purpose of the study was to examine the influence of parental handicaps on children's mental and social development, perceptions of their parents, behavioral activity and feelings toward their parents."
    The research group was 45 children of parents w/ disabilities, control group was 46 children of parents without disabilities.
    "The research group was found to express more positive and ambivalent feelings and less negative and indifferent feelings as compared to the control group."For entire study please click here

    C5/6 incomplete, injured Aug. 2000

    [This message was edited by Betheny on 01-15-04 at 02:18 PM.]

    [This message was edited by Betheny on 01-15-04 at 02:19 PM.]

  2. #2
    Beth, the link provided only the abstract. Is there link to full study?

  3. #3
    chick, the following are abstracts of papers that Duvdevany published recently. To get the full articles, it is necessary to get them from the journals and their sites. Unfortunately, most of these are subscriber based and charge for reprints. Occasionally, you might be able to find a reprint of the article provided by the author or somebody else on the web. Also some journals provide their archives of articles for free. So, I did a google search for "Duvdevany disability" and came up with a couple of her reprints that are available on the web. These are downloadable pdf files. I was, however, unable to find the specific subject that the abstract referred to. I did not do an exhaustive search, however.

    Factors leading to Return to Work

    Attitudes of Senior Psychiatry Residents Toward Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

    Developmental Expectations, Personality Stereotypes, and Attitudes Towards Inclusive Education: community and teacher views of Down syndrome

    Wise.

    • Duvdevany I (2002). Self-concept and adaptive behaviour of people with intellectual disability in integrated and segregated recreation activities. J Intellect Disabil Res. 46: 419-29. School of Social Work, Faculty of Welfare and Health Studies, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel. liana@research.haifa.ac.il. BACKGROUND: Leisure and recreation are areas in which the inclusion of people with intellectual disability (ID) in the community is required. In Israel, leisure activities have been developed over the past decade as part of the services provided to individuals with ID in the regular programmes of the community. However, even within those frameworks, people with ID are typically segregated from the whole population. METHODS: The purpose of the present study was to examine whether individuals with ID who participate in recreation activities with normal people as equals are different in their self-concept and adaptive behaviour from their counterparts who participate in segregated recreation programmes. Two hypotheses were examined: (1) whether people with ID who participate in integrated recreation programmes have a higher self-concept than those who participate in segregate programmes; and (2) whether individuals with ID who have better adaptive behaviour have a higher self-concept than people with ID who have lower adaptive behaviour. RESULTS: The hypotheses were partially confirmed. Differences were found in two subscales of self-concept. First, the physical self-concept of individuals with ID who participated in integrated programmes was found to be higher than that of their counterparts who participated in segregated programmes. Secondly, satisfaction with the whole self-concept of people with ID who participated in integrated programmes was found to be higher than of those who participated in segregated programmes. CONCLUSIONS: The implications of the research findings are discussed and future planning is recommended.

    • Duvdevany I and Abboud S (2003). Stress, social support and well-being of Arab mothers of children with intellectual disability who are served by welfare services in northern Israel. J Intellect Disabil Res. 47: 264-72. School of Social Work, Faculty of Welfare and Health Studies, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel. BACKGROUND: The present study examined the influence of a social support system on the level of stress and the sense of personal well-being of 100 Israeli Arab mothers of young children with special needs. METHODS: Fifty mothers were served by the welfare services in the Nazareth area while 50 did not get help on a regular basis. A comparison was done between educated, urban mothers, and less-educated, rural mothers. RESULTS: The research results point to a relationship between informal support resources, and the marital and economic stress of the mothers: the higher the amount of the informal support resources, the lower the level of stress that was experienced by the mothers. A relationship between the amount of informal support and level of parental stress was not confirmed. A relationship between the amount of support resources and the personal well-being of the mothers was found: the higher the amount of informal support resources, the higher the sense of well-being of the mothers. A relationship between formal support (the welfare services), and level of stress or personal well-being was not found. Education and place of living were not related to level of stress or personal well-being. Educated mothers from urban areas used the formal support (the welfare services) less than less-educated mothers who lived in rural areas. CONCLUSIONS: The findings are interpreted with respect to practice and previous studies.

    • Henry DB, Duvdevany I, Keys CB and Balcazar FE (2004). Attitudes of American and Israeli Staff Toward People With Intellectual Disabilities. Ment Retard. 42: 26-36. Authors: David B. Henry, PhD ( dhenry@uic.edu), Associate Professor, Institute for Juvenile Research, Department of Psychiatry; Christopher B. Keys, PhD, Professor, Department of Psychology; and Fabricio E. Balcazar, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, 840 S. Wood St., Chicago, IL 60612. Ilana Duvdevany, PhD, Associate Professor, Faculty of Social Work, University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa 31905, Israel. We compared the inclusion-related attitudes of community agency staff in the United States and Israel. Samples of 147 (United States) and 74 (Israel) staff members were assessed with the Community Living Attitudes Scale (CLAS). Results showed that higher educational levels, regardless of nation, were associated with higher Empowerment scores, lower Exclusion scores, lower Sheltering scores, and higher Similarity scores. Empowerment attitudes were strongly related to differences in the agencies in which individuals were employed. Controlling for age, education, and agency, we found that staff in the United States had higher Empowerment scores than did Israeli staff. Israeli staff had higher Sheltering and Similarity scores and marginally higher Exclusion scores than did the United States staff.

  4. #4
    Duhhh, sorry about that chick. Actually this was all I found in English. I'm learning...I found an address so e-mailed Moin asking for a link to the study. I'll let you know if I get a result.

    C5/6 incomplete, injured Aug. 2000

    [This message was edited by Betheny on 01-15-04 at 07:07 PM.]

  5. #5
    chick-
    I got a response from Duvdevany. The study is not yet published, they are waiting to hear from the journal. (S)he requested information regarding this website, and offered to send the presentation. Do you want me to ask her to?I'll keep you posted. Beth

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