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Thread: Clinical Tails in Spain,

  1. #1

    Clinical Tails in Spain,

    This summer at the HNP of Toledo will start a clinical trail to test de effectivity of the grow hormone in humans with more than 18 months injuried.
    Wise, what kind of effects do you think could be espected? Could it be a good therapy though it is in a provisional way ?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    aprain,

    Do you know what the purpose of the trial is? Growth hormone is something that is associated with the insulin response of the body to sugar. Insulin and chondrotinase was recently found reported to be beneficial in a rat model of acute spinal cord injury [1]. People with spinal cord injury may produce less growth hormone in response than identical twins but otherwise appear to be within normal limits [2]. These changes occur within the first few months after spinal cord injury [3], associated with significant changes in metabolism [4]. In mice, spinal cord injury is only associated with a slight and transient increase in growth hormone [5]. So, I am not sure why the trial is treating. Interestingly, baclofen seems to increase growth hormone levels in people with chronic spinal cord injury [6].

    Wise.

    1. Yang YG, Jiang DM, Quan ZX and Ou YS (2009). Insulin with chondroitinase ABC treats the rat model of acute spinal cord injury. J Int Med Res 37: 1097-107. Department of Orthopaedics, First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China. Traumatic brain injury is often associated with acute spinal cord injury (ASCI). Insulin and chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) are both therapeutically effective, but the combined therapeutic effect of insulin and ChABC is still not clear. A combination of insulin and ChABC were used to treat a rat model of ASCI. This combination therapy prevented neuronal cell death by improving motor function, increasing cell growth and inhibiting cell apoptosis in ASCI rats. Expression of growth-associated protein 43, a marker of axonal re-growth, increased after combined treatment with insulin and ChABC. These results may provide a basis for a future method of treating ASCI.
    2. Bauman WA, Zhang RL and Spungen AM (2007). Provocative stimulation of growth hormone: a monozygotic twin study discordant for spinal cord injury. J Spinal Cord Med 30: 467-72. Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Center of Excellence, James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bronx, New York 10468, USA. william.bauman@med.va.gov. BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: A blunted growth hormone (GH) response to provocative testing and/or low levels of plasma insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) have been reported in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). A reduction in activity of the GH-IGF-I axis may have deleterious effects on body composition and function. Provocative testing for GH stimulation was performed to determine the response in monozygotic twins that were discordant for SCI. METHODS: GH stimulation testing was performed by the administration of intravenous arginine. RESULTS: Nine SCI twins with paraplegia, a mean age of 39 +/- 9 years, and duration of injury of 14 +/- 9 years were studied. The twins with SCI had a significantly lower body mass index than non-SCI twins (22.5 +/- 4.0 vs 25.1 +/- 4.2 kg/m2; P < 0.05); percent fat mass was greater in the twins with SCI (30 +/- 11% vs 22 +/- 10%; P < 0.05). Baseline serum GH was correlated with percent fat only in the SCI twins. The response to GH provocative stimulation was less in the twins with SCI: peak GH response was 5.8 +/- 6.6 vs 13.0 +/- 7.3 ng/mL (P < 0.05), and sum GH response was 15.7 +/- 15.6 vs 30.2 +/- 17.3 ng/mL (P = 0.06). Although baseline serum GH was correlated with stimulated response in the SCI twins, this relationship was not found in the non-SCI twins. Adiposity was positively related to the provocative serum GH response in twins with SCI rather than negatively related, as noted in the non-SCI twins. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms and extends prior work that reported a reduction in stimulated GH release in persons with SCI, which was related to baseline values.
    3. Ung RV, Lapointe NP and Guertin PA (2008). Early adaptive changes in chronic paraplegic mice: a model to study rapid health degradation after spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord 46: 176-80. Neuroscience Unit, CHUL Research Center, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. STUDY DESIGN: Literature review. OBJECTIVE: To describe quantitatively some of most important anatomic, systemic, and metabolic changes occurring soon (one month) after spinal cord trauma in mice. SETTING: University Laval Medical Center. RESULTS: Significant changes in weight, mechanical and contractile muscle properties, bone histomorphometry and biomechanics, deep-vein morphology, complete blood count, immune cell count, lipid metabolism and anabolic hormone levels were found occurring within 1 month in completely spinal cord transected (Th9/10) mice. CONCLUSION: These data reveal that many changes in mice and humans are comparable suggesting, in turn, that this model may be a valuable tool for neuroscientists to investigate the specific mechanisms associated with rapid health degradation post-SCI.
    4. Primeaux SD, Tong M and Holmes GM (2007). Effects of chronic spinal cord injury on body weight and body composition in rats fed a standard chow diet. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 293: R1102-9. Pennington Biomedical Research Center, 6400 Perkins Road, Baton Rouge, LA 70808, USA. The inability to maintain body weight within prescribed ranges occurs in a significant portion of the human spinal cord injury (SCI) population. Using a rodent model of long-term high thoracic (spinal level T3) spinal cord transection (TX), we aimed to identify derangements in body weight, body composition, plasma insulin, glucose tolerance, and metabolic function, as measured by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression in interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT). Sixteen weeks after SCI, body weights of injured female rats stabilized and were significantly lower than surgical control animals. At the same time point, SCI rats had a significantly lower whole body fat:lean tissue mass ratio than controls, as measured indirectly by NMR. Despite lower body weight and fat mass, the cumulative consumption of standard laboratory chow (4.0 kcal/g) and mean energy intake (kcal.day(-1).100 g body wt(-1)) of chronic SCI rats was significantly more than controls. Glucose tolerance tests indicated a significant enhancement in glucose handling in 16-wk SCI rats, which were coupled with lower serum insulin levels. The post mortem weight of gonadal and retroperitoneal fat pads was significantly reduced after SCI and IBAT displayed significantly lower real-time PCR expression of UCP1 mRNA. The reduced fat mass and IBAT UCP1 mRNA expression are contraindicative of the cumulative caloric intake by the SCI rats. The prolonged postinjury loss of body weight, including fat mass, is not due to hypophagia but possibly to permanent changes in gastrointestinal transit and absorption, as well as whole body homeostatic mechanisms.
    5. Rouleau P, Ung RV, Lapointe NP and Guertin PA (2007). Hormonal and immunological changes in mice after spinal cord injury. J Neurotrauma 24: 367-78. Neuroscience Unit, Laval University Medical Center (CHUQ-CHUL), Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with immune deficiencies and life-threatening infections. However, the specific mechanisms underlying this pathological condition remain unclear. In recent years, increasing evidence has suggested that anabolic hormones may be involved in immunological complications. Here, we monitored candidate hormone concentrations and immune cell counts, in CD1 mice, for 4 weeks after low-thoracic transection of the spinal cord (Tx). Serum dihydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), insulin, and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels decreased throughout the time period studied compared with control, non-Tx mice. In turn, testosterone and growth hormone (GH) levels were only transiently changed, with a decrease of testosterone during the first 2 weeks and an increase of GH at 1 week post-Tx. A complete blood count revealed either unchanged or moderately decreased erythrocyte, platelet, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. Total leukocyte, lymphocyte, and eosinophil counts also decreased, whereas neutrophils and monocytes did not change significantly. In the bone marrow, lymphocyte numbers decreased and neutrophils increased, whereas monocytes, eosinophils, and megakariocytes did not change significantly. These results revealed significant changes occurring rapidly (<1-2 weeks) after Tx in both hormonal and immunological systems, providing compelling evidence of a role for anabolic hormones in SCI-related immune deficiencies.
    6. Bauman WA, Kirshblum SC, Morrison NG, Cirnigliaro CM, Zhang RL and Spungen AM (2006). Effect of low-dose baclofen administration on plasma insulin-like growth factor-I in persons with spinal cord injury. J Clin Pharmacol 46: 476-82. Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Center of Excellence, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 130 West Kingsbridge Road, Bronx, NY 10468, and the Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. Patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI), a condition associated with reduced physical function, have been reported to have lower plasma insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels than able-bodied persons. We evaluated the potential for daily low-dose baclofen administered over several weeks to increase plasma IGF-I levels. Ten healthy male outpatients with chronic SCI were studied prospectively. Patients received escalating doses of baclofen for 4 weeks at each dose level (5, 10, and 20 mg/d). At each dose of baclofen, an increase in the plasma IGF-I was noted; significant increases in plasma IGF-I occurred at 2 weeks after administration of drug at doses of 10 and 20 mg/d, with a subsequent rise to peak levels on baclofen 20 mg/d [baseline, 205+/-74; peak, 218+/-76 (not significant), 239+/-83 (P<.05), 263+/-87 microg/L (P<.05), at baclofen 5, 10, and 20 mg/d, respectively]. In conclusion, low-dose baclofen administration for 4 weeks stimulated the growth hormone-IGF-I axis in persons with SCI, with the potential for beneficial effects on body composition.


  3. #3
    I´ve readed about it and they want to test the safety and the regrowing effects of the hormone. The trail is a colaboration of the HNP (National Paraplegic Hospital) with a clinic called Foltra Proyect that have being using this GH for a long time in neuroligic injuried patients with as they say good results and tehy affirm it induces to neuro regeneration.

    Thanks again

  4. #4
    Hallo Dr.Young,

    This is ther website translated by google.


    http://translate.google.com/translat...2F&sl=es&tl=en
    keep (rolling) Walking

    Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

  5. #5
    Thanks. Wise.

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnnie Walker View Post
    Hallo Dr.Young,

    This is ther website translated by google.


    http://translate.google.com/translat...2F&sl=es&tl=en

  6. #6
    Dear Dr. Young

    Can you give me your opinion on this tharapy, when you have read

    Thank in advance
    keep (rolling) Walking

    Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

  7. #7
    Senior Member 0xSquidy's Avatar
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    I havent been there, but know some guys who have. It's a big 3-floor house in north spain as i'm told. They may not even charge you, you could say it's almost non profit but they have a huge queue. A friend of mine is expecting to be treated there in the summer.
    They are supposed to be making a deal with the HNP soon to make a clinical trial. I read about the treatment but I was shocked when they said the growth hormone generated neural stem cells... i don't know if they mistyped it or i'm just too ignorant to know that is actually possible but... let's hear what Wise's says.

  8. #8
    If I had to choose ten therapies that I would take into clinical trial for restoring function in spinal cord injury, growth hormone would not be in the top ten. I am not sure what they are expecting. Wise.

  9. #9
    Thanks Dr. Young
    keep (rolling) Walking

    Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by 0xSquidy View Post
    I havent been there, but know some guys who have. It's a big 3-floor house in north spain as i'm told. They may not even charge you, you could say it's almost non profit but they have a huge queue. A friend of mine is expecting to be treated there in the summer.
    They are supposed to be making a deal with the HNP soon to make a clinical trial. I read about the treatment but I was shocked when they said the growth hormone generated neural stem cells... i don't know if they mistyped it or i'm just too ignorant to know that is actually possible but... let's hear what Wise's says.
    I just did a literature search for growth hormone and spinal cord injury and was unable to find any animal studies indicating that growth hormones improve recovery in animals after spinal cord injury. Wise.

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