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Thread: In Your Guts

  1. #1

    Wink In Your Guts

    What clinical trial do you believe (or rather hope) will come to be our miracle?

  2. #2
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    Neurogel with combined therapy!
    gretchen 1

  3. #3
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    I'm a fan of nerve re-routing (but it needs improvement and we would need to be able to 'grow nerves lab-wise' (or borrow from cadavers) if that's even possible, so we don't lose what we already have.

    And that would only restore bowel, bladder and sexual function. Like hooking up a cable to 'plug in' an appliance. More Zhang than Xiao. Just found this year-old, but interesting article on the Xiao procedure:

    http://www.tampabay.com/features/hum...icle984049.ece

    By telephone last week, Peters called the results of the pilot at Beaumont "mixed."

    Twelve children got the surgery — three with spinal cord injuries, nine with spina bifida. The three with spinal cord injuries were not helped by the procedure. Seven of the nine with spina bifida saw "marked improvement." One of them was a "home run," a girl who achieved complete continence.

    When Peters addresses the conference this week, he will emphasize caution. Parents are desperate for help, he said. But because of the unknowns, "if a parent walked into my office and stuck $50,000 in my face, I'd have to say no."
    Last edited by lynnifer; 03-08-2010 at 08:09 PM.
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

  4. #4
    I´ll take that in a heartbeat. If and when it happens!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by lynnifer View Post
    And that would only restore bowel, bladder and sexual function. Like hooking up a cable to 'plug in' an appliance.
    T6 complete (or so I think), SCI since September 21, 2003

  5. #5
    Senior Member 0xSquidy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paramoto View Post
    i´ll take that in a heartbeat. If and when it happens!!!
    +100000

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by lynnifer View Post
    I'm a fan of nerve re-routing (but it needs improvement and we would need to be able to 'grow nerves lab-wise' (or borrow from cadavers) if that's even possible, so we don't lose what we already have.

    And that would only restore bowel, bladder and sexual function. Like hooking up a cable to 'plug in' an appliance. More Zhang than Xiao. Just found this year-old, but interesting article on the Xiao procedure:

    http://www.tampabay.com/features/hum...icle984049.ece

    By telephone last week, Peters called the results of the pilot at Beaumont "mixed."

    Twelve children got the surgery — three with spinal cord injuries, nine with spina bifida. The three with spinal cord injuries were not helped by the procedure. Seven of the nine with spina bifida saw "marked improvement." One of them was a "home run," a girl who achieved complete continence.

    When Peters addresses the conference this week, he will emphasize caution. Parents are desperate for help, he said. But because of the unknowns, "if a parent walked into my office and stuck $50,000 in my face, I'd have to say no."
    Lynnifer, unfortunately, there is no free lunch in this situation. This is not a matter of getting laboratory grown nerves. The sacrifice of the "anterior root" is not just to get a nerve to bridge but to actually use that anterior root (still attached to the spinal cord) to operate the bladder. So, if the surgeon uses the L2 root, that means that the hip flexor on that side (which L2 innervates) will become weak. It is not unlike tendon transfer surgery in that you are transferring some function from one tendon to another. In this case, you are transferring some function from one part of the spinal cord to another. People should understand this.

    Wise.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    Lynnifer, unfortunately, there is no free lunch in this situation. This is not a matter of getting laboratory grown nerves. The sacrifice of the "anterior root" is not just to get a nerve to bridge but to actually use that anterior root (still attached to the spinal cord) to operate the bladder. So, if the surgeon uses the L2 root, that means that the hip flexor on that side (which L2 innervates) will become weak. It is not unlike tendon transfer surgery in that you are transferring some function from one tendon to another. In this case, you are transferring some function from one part of the spinal cord to another. People should understand this.

    Wise.
    Can you use the L2 root even if you're not currently functioning their? I guess I'm asking, wouldn't it be okay to sacrafice a root that is not working and probably won't for awhile...
    Donnie: Dr. Xiao, What are your thoughts on a cure/combination therapy for SCI's??
    CG Xiao: Donnie, I don't want to disappoint you, but I think it is impossible to restore the continuity of the cord or "bridge the gap" in the near future, let's say: 50 years. Dr Wise Young has been my most respected scientist in SCI. He has dedicated and contributed to SCI no other can match.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Donnie View Post
    Can you use the L2 root even if you're not currently functioning their? I guess I'm asking, wouldn't it be okay to sacrafice a root that is not working and probably won't for awhile...
    If you have cervical or upper thoracic injury and you have spasticity, the chances are very good that your lumbar segments are working. Your brain cannot get access to the lower spinal cord. Dr. Xiao has said that he prefers to use the lower lumbar roots because the regeneration time would be shorter. If you do not have voluntary function or sensation in that particular segment and you don't mind not having it in the future, it is a reasonable decision to say that you are willing to trade a non-functioning segment for better control of the bladder. According to Dr. Xiao's more recent lectures, there may be bowel improvement as well but I have not seen any of the data or what the improvements are. While many people have been saying sexual function, let me caution everybody that there has not been any credible claims that the nerve bridging improves sexual function, at least not that I have seen.

    Wise.

  9. #9
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
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    I had read that in the -what turns out to be 'obligatory email sent out' when I looked into it ... (along with the 85%, standard of care, blah blah blah).

    Between this 'cafuffle' and the Ampyra debacle ... it's not looking good.
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

  10. #10
    no one feels for umbilical cord blood cells with lithium?

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