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Thread: Service Dog

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSWIFE1 View Post
    JenJen - are you saying that I can deduct dog food, vet bills, etc. because our dog that we had prior to David getting sick can turn lights on, shut doors, and a few other things to help David? If so this is great. I never really considered her a service dog because I assumed you had to have the certifications.
    you can train your own dog, and then have it tested to certify. it must wear a service dog vest and be able to do a certain number of tasks that aid the disabled owner in day to day tasks. there are different levels of certification also, and different types of service dogs are required to do different tasks. the dog learns more as he realises the needs of the person and the list of tasks the gets larger as the relationship evolves. you can google to find out what is available in your state as far as places that test service dogs for certification.

  2. #12
    Jody, you've been mis-informed.

    You CAN train your own service dog. There is ABSOLUTELY NO testing required and you cannot be forced to do so. "Certification" is dubious and can NEVER be legally used to deny access. Actually, I would urge you NOT to go for any of the certification programs. Some are good, many are not; NONE are necessary.

    While many service animals wear a vest or scarf to designate their status; it is NOT required and your service animal can not be barred from entry because it's not marked.

    There are NO required tasks for any service animal and there is not a required number of tasks in order to be a "true" service animal. There is an association for people who train service dogs, their recommendation is that your animal be able to perform a minimum of two tasks.

    To be a service animal you need two things:
    1. a person with a disability
    2 the animal must mitigate that person's disability in some way.

    The animal also needs to be suitably trained and socialized so that it will not cause a public health hazard.





    Quote Originally Posted by jody View Post
    you can train your own dog, and then have it tested to certify. it must wear a service dog vest and be able to do a certain number of tasks that aid the disabled owner in day to day tasks. there are different levels of certification also, and different types of service dogs are required to do different tasks. the dog learns more as he realises the needs of the person and the list of tasks the gets larger as the relationship evolves. you can google to find out what is available in your state as far as places that test service dogs for certification.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by JenJen View Post
    Jody, you've been mis-informed.

    You CAN train your own service dog. There is ABSOLUTELY NO testing required and you cannot be forced to do so. "Certification" is dubious and can NEVER be legally used to deny access. .
    Jen is right, see what I bolded in red in my post #5 above, straight from here

    http://www.ada.gov/qasrvc.htm

    I started doing some more research o it the other day.

    Right now I figure it is stretching it to consider my Lab a service dog, as the only thing I have gotten her to do consistently is pick up her own toys when they are in my path. And cleaning food spills on the floors. I never followed through with more, although we were training her to bring my chair to me, if I were not in it. Mostly, my kids lost interest and since I didn;t really NEED anything from her, it kinda fell through the cracks. The kids were easier to train, LOL. Now that the kids are all in college and/or moved out, I wish we had done more "get me the ....". Which of course, is harder to train her to do, now that they aren;t here to help. LOL. She is 10 now, so I am thinking about getting another dog and training her.

    Jen .... I was thinking more along the lines of trying to train a 2-3 y/o rescue dog, then a puppy, simply because I am not sure about training a puppy these days, w/o help during the day.

    Do you think this would be a problem?
    Last edited by sjean423; 03-05-2010 at 04:20 PM.
    T7-8 since Feb 2005

  4. #14
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    Of course, trying to get something down from a high shelf today, I wonder about service giraffes?
    T7-8 since Feb 2005

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by sjean423 View Post
    Of course, trying to get something down from a high shelf today, I wonder about service giraffes?

    According to my understanding of the ADA, this would be perfectly acceptable. I think you're on to something Sjean.

    Cats, dogs, horses, pigs, have all been used as service animals. I know a guy who's green wing macaw alerts to his diabetic crashes and has learned to ask for his meds when that happens. It was not planned but it works so yes, he can take the bird with him for that except it tends to want to bite people and he can't train that away so the bird stays home. Public safety.

    Sjean, I trained Pearl with almost no assistance from when she was weaned. I've learned a lot and my next will come housetrained. That was a fiasco as I was not fast enough for her puppy bladder. now we have a doggie door so it's less of an issue.

    Crates and doggie doors will save me when it's time to train my next. Plus Pearl will do a lot of the work. If you can find the right dog, age will be irrelevant although they are easier to train when they're young.

    There are some temperament tests posted on some of the websites. I would use that tool to help pick your dog. Sjean, you know how to find me if you want to discuss this in depth.

    I gotta get back to packing.

  6. #16
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    Yes, I need to skip the housetraining w/o helpers during the day, like you said, if I am not actually in the chair, I am not fast enough to anticipate a puddle.
    T7-8 since Feb 2005

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by sjean423 View Post
    Of course, trying to get something down from a high shelf today, I wonder about service giraffes?
    or you could try this cat the climbing is there, although I think major work on co-operation skills would be needed

  8. #18
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    That might work w/ one of mine. She is fascinated with the kitchen. The same one that stands on her hind feet trying to get the ceiling fan. I'll have to consider that!
    T7-8 since Feb 2005

  9. #19
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    This is all really very interesting however, we have steered a bit away from the original post. Hopefully this info helps him as well.

    sjean- our dog cleans up food spills too (thats her specialty)

  10. #20
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    On a more serious note, I have read of cats being trained to recognize seizures as well as dogs, and a woman whose cat would actually bring her inhaler when she had an asthma attack. And they have been known to frequently be used for people with psychiatric diagnoses.
    T7-8 since Feb 2005

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