Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 41

Thread: I know, I know, it's horribly idealistic of me........

  1. #31
    Senior Member arod636's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Bay Area, Cali
    Posts
    640
    You need to find a lawyer who will get his fees paid through the lawsuit. I cannot talk about my cases as they are still in process but my lawyer is very good at his job. I have been very happy with all the work he has done up to this point...

    Quote Originally Posted by wazabiker View Post
    A lawsuit sounds simple. but isn't there a tremendous financial cost? I have thought about filing, but hesitated due to the financial outlay.

    Can you cite examples of your legal successes?

  2. #32
    here in the netherlands all new buildings even if its a house has to made wheelchair accesible by building law.
    But when it comes to governement own buildings and state firms as dutch railways they say you have the time to make it accesible untill 2030 .
    if here you go by train you have to call 3 hrs before departure .than they pick a bridge on the railwaystation and push you in the train .lol and than hope the dont forget to get you out .(lol i had it few times).
    a police station here has a steep hill of 5 meters that i cant get up with my strong arms .than i have to ring a bellpolice officer comes to push me uphill.

    many stores in old citys arnt accesible .and sometimes when you can get in you have to remember the route you rolled else you cant get out of the store anymore deu to cloathing thats hanging and other kind of stuff .ore they dont have a lift so you cant get to the second floor .in the time i could walk i never thought about it now confined to a wheelchair i get depressed about these things sometimes .
    And here no lawer can help u since there isnt a law that protects us since it would cost billions of euros to make all accesible 4 wheelchairs

  3. #33
    I oscillate on the US-vs-Canada thing. I think that Canada is overall less accessible because of old buildings and harsh climate. But I think that in general Canadians are more inclusive and wouldn't hesitate to befriend someone in a wc, or vote for them, or hire them as their lawyer. In the US I get the sense that people are scared of being sued.

    These are just overgeneralizing ramblings, ymmv of course. Also I suspect region has more to do with attitudes than country...

    Kiran, no good advice because I never really even tried to go out as a student. JenJen's sounds wise though.

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by lynnifer View Post
    http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/pr...accessibility/

    loreo, did you know medical facilities (including doctor's offices) are exempt for 25yrs? That takes us into 2030 ...
    Is possible to know that yet? The built environment standard is still in draft form. I believe the final version will become law this year.

    I do believe though that your statement may be the ultimate result. The goal for the legislation is to have Ontario completely accessible by 2025. The built environment is the one standard that will likely take this whole period to phase in accessibility because of the older buildings. I find most medical facilities already accessible (with the exception of door openers), do you have a problem with lack of access?

    The other standards have a more immediate impact with 2-5 year deadlines. The customer service standard will address situations like Kiran is caught in. There will be no more planning meetings, events etc. without considering accessibility up front.

    I think the information and communication standard will transform the way we do things and provide amazing access for people previously limited. (alternative format requirements for documents, closed captioning, descriptive video etc)

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by loreo View Post
    In Ontario we have incredible new legislation: the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act.
    Loreo, thanks for bringing this to my attention. When I lived in Pittsburgh, Toronto was a weekend getaway place for my wife and I. I also had a number of work-related trips there. In fact, I was an accessibility consultant there when they were planning for the 1976 summer paraolympics. I got a lot of freebies out of that! lol Also Ottowa is one of my favorite cities. It has to be one of the cleanest cities in the world. My wife and I were there for a few days and experienced the Canada Day festivities on the Parliament grounds. The mounties were incredible in seeing that I was accommodated. They made sure I had a front row place, and even moved people out of the way so I could take unobstructed photos. My wife tried to coax one to come back to Pittsburgh to run interference for us. lol Of course, the streets were lined with food vendors but when we got up early the next morning there was not a piece of paper or other debris on them.

    We also made a couple trips to Nova Scotia, which is beautiful and friendly, but not quite so accessible. My one negative experience in Canada occurred during a work-related trip to Montreal. Unfortunately, it was during the period when the language turmoil was going on. If I ventured outside the hotel, many of the people were rude and even insulted me because I could not speak French. I assume it has changed, but I never went back.

    I am surprised Canada is enacting disability legislation province by province rather than nationally.
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by SCIfor55yrs. View Post
    Loreo, thanks for bringing this to my attention. When I lived in Pittsburgh, Toronto was a weekend getaway place for my wife and I. I also had a number of work-related trips there. In fact, I was an accessibility consultant there when they were planning for the 1976 summer paraolympics. I got a lot of freebies out of that! lol Also Ottowa is one of my favorite cities. It has to be one of the cleanest cities in the world. My wife and I were there for a few days and experienced the Canada Day festivities on the Parliament grounds. The mounties were incredible in seeing that I was accommodated. They made sure I had a front row place, and even moved people out of the way so I could take unobstructed photos. My wife tried to coax one to come back to Pittsburgh to run interference for us. lol Of course, the streets were lined with food vendors but when we got up early the next morning there was not a piece of paper or other debris on them.

    We also made a couple trips to Nova Scotia, which is beautiful and friendly, but not quite so accessible. My one negative experience in Canada occurred during a work-related trip to Montreal. Unfortunately, it was during the period when the language turmoil was going on. If I ventured outside the hotel, many of the people were rude and even insulted me because I could not speak French. I assume it has changed, but I never went back.

    I am surprised Canada is enacting disability legislation province by province rather than nationally.
    If a few provinces move in this direction, I'm sure there will be a push for federal legislation.

    I'm glad you enjoyed your trips here. Come again neighbour. Isn't that crazy about Ottawa? I have no idea how they keep it so clean but it always is. Beyond clean actually, everywhere is landscaped to perfection.

    Language has always been a sensitive subject here. I can't speak for our Francophones, but I would think it's tough to be a minority trying to preserve a culture that is constantly overwhelmed by English everything. The only observable support from the rest of the country seemed to come when referendums for separation were held. I do feel that finally we have more than token efforts at bilingualism now. It's taken a while, but now kids in the school system learn French from Kindergarten through grade 9 and beyond if desired. Everything sold etc has Fr/Eng labels and all government services are offered in both languages. Bilingualism has made its way into our lives so that we can all access services etc whether we speak Eng or Fr. I think this is the same approach the accessibility legislation is taking.

  7. #37
    Senior Member Jeff B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,402
    Quote Originally Posted by KiranA View Post
    but sometimes I wish my fellow law students would protest any school based event that's held somewhere completely inaccessible by not attending the event. I feel as if I can only speak out so many times before I begin to sound like a broken record. I'd give anything to have someone else, aside from me, and someone who is not disabled, to stand up and say how discriminatory it is.

    Sorry. This is just a vent.
    That's strange. I would tend towards finding a way to make sure the good looking girl can come along.

  8. #38
    I was just talking to my boyfriend who knows a lot about building standards. We do have accessibility standards here in BC, however, since Victoria has a lot of heritage buildings, there are bylaws saying they don't have to be changed. With the night clubs downtown for example, there are already so many clubs that no more are permitted, but since the existing ones are all in heritage buildings they aren't required to be modified to be accessible. If new clubs were allowed to be built, they would all have to be built to accommodate us wheelies.

    Your best bet is probably to get involved with the planning of the events or go to the UVSS and claim discrimination. If you ever want an AB person to protest with you, my boyfriend like getting involved! He's taking a break from school right now but will be heading back to UVic next semester. Good luck with everything!
    ~Ashley~

  9. #39
    While doing some research for a paper I actually ran across an article from the Canadian Journal of Sociology called
    "To Pee or Not to Pee?" Ordinary talk about extraordinary exclsuions in a university environment
    LOL I thought if this thread.
    If you can't handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don't deserve me at my best.


    Sometimes it is easier to widen doors than it is to open minds.

  10. #40
    Senior Member lynnifer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Windsor ON Canada
    Posts
    19,320
    It's funny you say that addiesue ... the year my friends and I were to graduate from high school, we travelled to a couple of universities to visit. I was on a sole mission .. to see how (in)accessible they were .. this was in 1991.

    The first one - University of Windsor - and my friends and I and other students and a random professor we ran into could not find a wheelchair accessible washroom on all of the sprawling campus. There wasn't one. Nor the surrounding city blocks.

    I usually drove on these escapades. While my friends were babbling with excitement, I was stunned. My father used to say that I would never make it in university ... after that visit I believed him. It was a brutal punch for an 18yr old.

    Things are so different now ... better ... and thank goodness they are.
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

Similar Threads

  1. Decompression surgery gone horribly wrong
    By the5taters in forum Pain
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 01-10-2006, 08:39 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •