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Thread: Transfer board or slide board

  1. #1

    Transfer board or slide board

    Hello
    I was hoping someone could provide some information.
    Is a transfer board or slide board meant to be used to assist someone who can do no more than hang on to the person assisting?
    I thought that the board was to be positioned between two objects and a caregiver would have the person to be transferred put their hands around the caregiver's neck while the caregiver slid the person along the slideboard. However, while asking a physical therapist about this, she stated that the person being transferred needs to reposition their hands repeatedly along the board.
    Anyone know more about this?

  2. #2
    Senior Member djrolling's Avatar
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    I was given a transfer board and trained to use it to be able to transfer by myself. Depending on your level of injury you may be more or less sucessful but I am sure the goal is to make you as independent as possible and you will want to be able to do as much for yourself by yourself as possible

  3. #3
    Thanks.
    I'm actually writing as a caregiver. The goal is really just to be able to use a transfer board to help someone else. The other person can't assist in the transfer other than to give me a hug while I transfer her.

  4. #4
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    Mocusm - I am a caregiver as well to my husband who has ms. He has virtually no use of his legs, poor trunk muscles and can only use his right arm. They tried to teach me how to use the slide board to transfer him with him hugging me and me doing the sliding. David is 6'1' and 185 lbs. I am 5'4" and 145 lbs. I don't feel comfortable doing it. I am afraid I am going to hurt my back and/or drop him. His legs always seem to get hung up. I can't hold the top half of him and slide and move his legs at the same time. I gave up and we use the hoyer lift to move from the wheelchair to the recliner or vehicle, etc. and then I have a ceiling lift mounted in the bedroom to get him in and out of bed.

  5. #5
    There are various boards and yes some to have the person to actually work towards independent transfers and others to use as an assist. The caregiver should not have anyone hang on their necks though. The EasyBeasy board is easier to use to assist a patient, but again the best thing is to do some homework, ask an experienced therapist for help and go from there. I think MSWIFE is smart to find other ways to assist her husband safely. It is important to protect both the caregiver and the loved one needing care...

  6. #6
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    Moscum,
    If you have found a way of doing a sucessful transfer stick with it and ignore the "patient needing to reposition their hands" advice. It would be true if he was sliding himself across the board, but since you are the one responsible for forward momentum that is just a silly thing to say. Do you have an Ultraslick transfer board? All boards work the same mechanically, but the ultraslick has a special coating that makes it very easy to slide across.

  7. #7
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    The beasy board is the one that has the round disc that actually slides (on bearings) right? I have that one and then just a plain wooden one, no handles, tapers on both ends. I hated both of them. I was just to nervous.

  8. #8
    Thanks for the replies. I did buy a beasy board- pretty expensive for a piece of plastic with a disc! I am having the most trouble just positioning the board under the person. It seems too thick.

    I had a physical therapist come out today for the sole purpose of learning how to use the beasy board or I'll even buy another board, but she kept saying that the person being transferred needed to scoot themselves along the board with their hands unless the Beasy Board is being used.
    I didn't know if the physical therapist was not educated enough or if I was mistaken about transfer boards. I don't know whether to call the home health agency and ask for a physical therapist who knows more about transfer boards or stick with this one.

    I did see a you-tube video of a person using a transfer board and it looked like the person being transferred had to hold the opposite side of the board down while being transferred.
    I don't know if transfer boards are unsafe to use in the manner I'm hoping to use it or not.

    The person I care for is a "mod assist" according to the physical therapist and she said Medicare wouldn't pay for a hoyer lift. I guess "mod assist" would be correct, but that doesn't take into account the back problems of the person trying to assist.
    Last edited by mocusm; 02-26-2010 at 12:25 AM.

  9. #9
    Never let anyone hang onto your neck during a transfer!! This is VERY dangerous and can easily lead to ruptured discs or other back/neck problems for the caregiver.

    We only use slide boards for those who can provide at least 1/2 of the effort of the transfer themselves, by using their hands/arms to push/pull from the wheelchair to the bed or car. While you can use one for a dependent transfer (by grasping the person around their WAIST using a gait belt) it is very risky, and can lead to injuries for the caregiver. We use a mechanical lift for those who are more dependent (and never a "quad pivot"). Using principals of Safe Patient Handling & Movement (SPHM) for our family caregivers and PCAs we are training is just as important as our 100% implementation of these principles for the safety of our staff in the workplace.

    We have seen some significant skin problems (and scrotal pinching) from the Beasey Board, so do not use these. We also use the Ultraslick slide board.

    While Medicare will not cover a mechanical lift, they are fairly readily available used (try eBay under "patient lift"), and MUCH cheaper than an injury and possible long term pain and disability to the caregiver, perhaps even causing the person with the disability to have to go to a nursing home instead of being at home.

    (KLD)

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