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Thread: New Stem Cell Research Findings Could Lead to Cure of Spinal Cord Injuries, Brain Inj

  1. #1

    New Stem Cell Research Findings Could Lead to Cure of Spinal Cord Injuries, Brain Inj

    AMEN!



    New Stem Cell Research Findings Could Lead to Cure of Spinal Cord Injuries, Brain Injuries, and ALS!
    Posted: Jan 25, 2010

    Many people have suffered from spinal cord and brain injuries, not to mention amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig disease, a debilitating disease characterized by muscle weakness in the arms and legs, followed by difficulty swallowing, talking, and breathing, (Dorland’s Medical Dictionary (DMD)). Eventually muscles become completely useless and the patient becomes a quadriplegic, (DMD). With all this said, scientists have discovered how to use stem cells to generate new nerve cells in the brain of mice.

    Neuroscientists at Stanford Medical School Transplanted neurons (nerve cells) grown from embryonic stem cells and integrate them into the brains of mice, according to new research in the Jan. 20 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. The study states that healthy brains have stable and precise connections between cells that are necessary for normal behavior in animals, including human. This new finding is the first to show that stem cells can be directed to become specific brain cells. In fact, the stem cells not only become specific brain cells, but they link correctly, the research states. This is welcoming news for people suffering from neurological disorders, brain, or spinal cord injuries. Such discovery sets the stage for a possible cure of nerve-related diseases.

    more...

    http://www.articlesbase.com/diseases...s-1778118.html

  2. #2
    Senior Member 0xSquidy's Avatar
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    Just as in the developmental stages of a brand new fetus when different types of precursor cells know exactly where they should go and what they should do, the experimental stem cells-induced neurons in this study perform their duties accordingly—extending to appropriate brain structures, while avoiding inappropriate ones. For instance, neuron-producing stem cells transplanted into the visual cortex of the brain reached two deep brain structures called the superior colliculus and the pons, but did not reach the spinal cord; on the other hand, neuron-producing stem cells placed into the motor of the cortex stretched into the spinal cord, but totally avoided the colliculus, according to the study. This feat is simply amazing in already fully developed animals. Granted, it is not unusual in newly developing fetuses; however, it is certainly next to impossible in fully developed animals, such as mice—and soon to be human.

    The use of stem cells to develop nerve cells in mice is quite a feat that has never been done before. This discovery definitely set the stage for a possible cure for spinal cord injuries, brain injuries, and ALS. Therefore, people who suffer from these ailments can be best assured that there could be relief in the not so distant future.
    Sounds good...we should be putting pressure everywhere folks! Like pain in the ass.

  3. #3
    Quite exciting. The first application of the induced neural stem cells.

    Wise.

    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    AMEN!



    New Stem Cell Research Findings Could Lead to Cure of Spinal Cord Injuries, Brain Injuries, and ALS!
    Posted: Jan 25, 2010

    Many people have suffered from spinal cord and brain injuries, not to mention amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig disease, a debilitating disease characterized by muscle weakness in the arms and legs, followed by difficulty swallowing, talking, and breathing, (Dorland’s Medical Dictionary (DMD)). Eventually muscles become completely useless and the patient becomes a quadriplegic, (DMD). With all this said, scientists have discovered how to use stem cells to generate new nerve cells in the brain of mice.

    Neuroscientists at Stanford Medical School Transplanted neurons (nerve cells) grown from embryonic stem cells and integrate them into the brains of mice, according to new research in the Jan. 20 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. The study states that healthy brains have stable and precise connections between cells that are necessary for normal behavior in animals, including human. This new finding is the first to show that stem cells can be directed to become specific brain cells. In fact, the stem cells not only become specific brain cells, but they link correctly, the research states. This is welcoming news for people suffering from neurological disorders, brain, or spinal cord injuries. Such discovery sets the stage for a possible cure of nerve-related diseases.

    more...

    http://www.articlesbase.com/diseases...s-1778118.html

  4. #4
    Love it when Dr. Young says "Quite Exciting"
    oh well

  5. #5
    Senior Member Duran's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kenf View Post
    Love it when Dr. Young says "Quite Exciting"
    Seriously? I think Wise just enjoyed his good Sunday's dinner...
    2016

  6. #6
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    Quite exciting. The first application of the induced neural stem cells.

    Wise.
    where is the part about using this on humans? you say none, therefore this is not exciting.
    when it is used on humans, then it'll become exciting. until then, it is nothing more than a study that will fade away into forgotten-ville or never have any money for human benefit.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by DA View Post
    where is the part about using this on humans? you say none, therefore this is not exciting.
    when it is used on humans, then it'll become exciting. until then, it is nothing more than a study that will fade away into forgotten-ville or never have any money for human benefit.
    DA,

    You should look under the covers before saying that there is nothing exciting underneath.

    This is exciting for the following reasons. As many of you know, there are very few sources of immune-compatible neural stem cells.
    1. Autograft from brain. While there are some neural stem cells in your brain, it seems a bit extreme to take out a chunk of brain to grow some neural stem cells and transplant them into the spinal cord. While I am sure that some people may think that that they can afford to lose a chunk of their hippocampus, subventricular zone, an olfactory bulb where adult neural stem cells are present in their brains, it is not likely to be a generally used source of neural stem cells.
    2. Neurons differentiated from bone marrow cells. Since Ira Black and his colleague reported in 1999 reported that they could transform bone marrow cells into neurons, there has been a great deal of interest and even companies formed to take this approach to clinical trial. However, with the exception of Mari Dezawa at Tohoku University, nobody has been able to do this consistently.
    3. Cloned stem cells (somatic cell nuclear transfer) that have been differentiated into neural stem cells. As many people here know, while cloning is theoretically possible, it has been controversial and not yet achieved.
    4. Induced pluripotent cells (IPS) that have been differentiated into neural stem cells. This was a possible source. However, there is still the hurdle that IPS cells produce teratomas, the same safety hurdle that must be jumped as embryonic stem cells.
    5. Now there is induced neural stem (INS) cells, using only three genes. This is not only exciting because it provides a source of neurons that can be made from fibroblasts but it may help make the Dezawa procedure of differentiating bone marrow cells even more reliable and efficient. Finally, it bypasses induced pluripotent stem cells.


    The report that there were able create such cells were first reported just a month ago. Now the report that these cells can be used to replace motoneurons in the spinal cord is exciting. I think that this is an important advance, particularly people who need neuronal replacement due to injuries to the lumbosacral cord, high cervical spinal cord, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In my opinion, this development just cut about 3-5 years from the development of neural stem cells to treat spinal cord injury.

    Wise.

  8. #8
    Wise; 3 to 5 years, now that's news and encouraging.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Duran's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    Autograft from brain. While there are some neural stem cells in your brain, it seems a bit extreme to take out a chunk of brain to grow some neural stem cells and transplant them into the spinal cord. While I am sure that some people may think that that they can afford to lose a chunk of their hippocampus, subventricular zone, an olfactory bulb where adult neural stem cells are present in their brains, it is not likely to be a generally used source of neural stem cells.
    I think this is what Cedars-Sinai Medical Center had once planned to perform on 12 paraplegic patients with chronic spinal cord injury. The FDA considered it a very risky approach, thus disapproving highly anticipated clinical trial with using stem cells obtained from adult hippocampus (the first of its kind). It happened in 1999 and should have been funded by Spinal Cord Society, as far as I can recall. As if it were yesterday...
    2016

  10. #10
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    DA,

    You should look under the covers before saying that there is nothing exciting underneath.

    This is exciting for the following reasons. As many of you know, there are very few sources of immune-compatible neural stem cells.
    1. Autograft from brain. While there are some neural stem cells in your brain, it seems a bit extreme to take out a chunk of brain to grow some neural stem cells and transplant them into the spinal cord. While I am sure that some people may think that that they can afford to lose a chunk of their hippocampus, subventricular zone, an olfactory bulb where adult neural stem cells are present in their brains, it is not likely to be a generally used source of neural stem cells.
    2. Neurons differentiated from bone marrow cells. Since Ira Black and his colleague reported in 1999 reported that they could transform bone marrow cells into neurons, there has been a great deal of interest and even companies formed to take this approach to clinical trial. However, with the exception of Mari Dezawa at Tohoku University, nobody has been able to do this consistently.
    3. Cloned stem cells (somatic cell nuclear transfer) that have been differentiated into neural stem cells. As many people here know, while cloning is theoretically possible, it has been controversial and not yet achieved.
    4. Induced pluripotent cells (IPS) that have been differentiated into neural stem cells. This was a possible source. However, there is still the hurdle that IPS cells produce teratomas, the same safety hurdle that must be jumped as embryonic stem cells.
    5. Now there is induced neural stem (INS) cells, using only three genes. This is not only exciting because it provides a source of neurons that can be made from fibroblasts but it may help make the Dezawa procedure of differentiating bone marrow cells even more reliable and efficient. Finally, it bypasses induced pluripotent stem cells.


    The report that there were able create such cells were first reported just a month ago. Now the report that these cells can be used to replace motoneurons in the spinal cord is exciting. I think that this is an important advance, particularly people who need neuronal replacement due to injuries to the lumbosacral cord, high cervical spinal cord, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In my opinion, this development just cut about 3-5 years from the development of neural stem cells to treat spinal cord injury.

    Wise.
    3 to 5 years from what? 30 years.
    dr young, focus on my words, all the breakthroughs including this one is no good if
    it never benefit people. when it benefits humans, then it becomes exciting. right now it is nothing more than a politicans promise.

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