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Thread: Mandelbulb 3D Flyby

  1. #1

    Mandelbulb 3D Flyby

    This is even better when viewed in HD. Fascinating!



    Excellent thread: http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread542140/pg1

    More information, pics and vids: http://www.skytopia.com/project/frac...b.html#renders
    "So I have stayed as I am, without regret, seperated from the normal human condition." Guy Sajer

  2. #2
    Moderator jody's Avatar
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    they really are beautiful

    .....

  3. #3
    Moderator jody's Avatar
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    .....

    ......

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    Moderator jody's Avatar
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    I understand that it is math, it kind of remindes me of microscopic sea creatures, but what is it actually? how does it become this?

  5. #5
    Senior Member mr_coffee's Avatar
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    jody,


    I took more math than a human should take so I understand this but its hard to explain without sounding mathy.

    But a simple example of how you can draw math, is simply drawing a function on a piece of paper, you can get x and y coordinates of a function by simplying supplying an x and it will spit out another number for y.

    So example:
    Here is a simple function: f(x) = x^3 - 9x
    now if you kept feeding it x values, it would keep spitting out y values, and you could draw it, and if you did it would look like this:
    But you see this function must follow boundaries, it can't just go where ever it wants, its limited by the range(the numbers it can calculate) of the function,and it also has a specific domain (the numbers it can take).



    not very cool right?

    Now if you get more complex with the function you graph, the picture gets cooler, for example here is another function:

    f(x, y) = sin(x2)┬Ěcos(y2)




    Pretty cool right?



    Now you can see the mandelbrot is just the same, just has cooler properties than the above functions so they produce even cooler images.

    The Mandelbrot set is just a set of complex numbers. A given complex number c either belongs to the Mandelbrot set M or it does not.

    So if you would color all the points that are in M, and keep all the points that aren't in M white, then you would get a cool looking picture, or a fractal.

    They are simply making these fractal's 3d which makes it look cooler. They use algorithms to draw the set.

    For example the most simplest one would be the escape time algorithm which draws the pictures like this:

    Imagine a point with x and y coordinates as a starting value of a calculation, well once that calculation is done, you use the result as the starting value for the next calculation.

    Now there are boundaries each point must follow (its either in the set or it isn't) if it hits a boundary then its reached a critical escape condition. If it does reach this escape condition then the calculation is stopped and the pixel is drawn and then it repeats itself for the next point.

    Now if you increase the number of iterations, the final image will be very detailed and awesome looking but it will also take a long time to produce.

    Different algorithms will produce different looking pictures but all follow the rules of being a Mandebulb set.


    Something really cool is when they find fractals in nature such as this:





    Thats food!
    Last edited by mr_coffee; 02-11-2010 at 05:22 AM.
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  6. #6
    Mr. coffee

    I am very impressed. One of the best explanations that I have heard. Bravo.

    Wise.

  7. #7
    Senior Member mr_coffee's Avatar
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    Thanks wise! I was a math tutor back in the day!
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  8. #8
    Senior Member JimD's Avatar
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    This is fascinating stuff. Arthur C. Clarke discussed the Mandelbrot set extensively in the novel "The Ghost from the Grand Banks"; if I remember, he even had a character go partially catatonic, just staring at an endless regressive M set depiction on her computer.

    Thanks for the explanation, Cory!

  9. #9
    Moderator jody's Avatar
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    understandable. thanx. here are those sea creatures, and a few other natural fractal like things. I was also going to post the broccoli above.

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