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Thread: Blood Red Jelly Fish in the Arctic

  1. #1

    Blood Red Jelly Fish in the Arctic

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...75_600x450.jpg


    Blood-Red Jellyfish
    Photograph by Kevin Raskoff

    December 11, 2009--In the black depths of the frigid Arctic Ocean, scientists on a 2005 expedition found a splash of color: The brilliant, blood-red Crossota norvegica jellyfish (pictured).

    The creature was spotted by a remotely operated vehicle 8,530 feet (2,600 meters) underwater during a two-month National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) expedition to the Canada Basin, the deepest and least explored part of the Arctic waters.

    Though C. norvegica is not a new species, several new deep-sea animals were discovered during the expedition--some of which were announced in recent research papers in 2009.

    More...

  2. #2
    But the usual jelly fish is red here too. Is this a new kind? It is burning but it is only uncomfertable, not dangerous
    TH 12, 43 years post

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by woman from Europe View Post
    But the usual jelly fish is red here too. Is this a new kind? It is burning but it is only uncomfertable, not dangerous
    Benthe, apparently it is not a newly discovered species. It is just a bit unusual that they have found these in the frigid waters of the arctic ocean. Wise.

  4. #4
    Now, I am stupid, but the sea water is never colder than -4C so why is it unusal to find the jelly fish then in the North Atlantic. I mean, even here the fjord is getting ice in the winter and the jelly fish survieve?

    Well, Jelly fishes is not one of my spesiallities, I don't know too much about them.
    TH 12, 43 years post

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by woman from Europe View Post
    Now, I am stupid, but the sea water is never colder than -4C so why is it unusal to find the jelly fish then in the North Atlantic. I mean, even here the fjord is getting ice in the winter and the jelly fish survieve?

    Well, Jelly fishes is not one of my spesiallities, I don't know too much about them.
    Benthe, it is not the temperature but that they can find food in such a frigid environment. The Jellyfish must eat something and it simply means that there is food in the Arctic ocean, enough to sustain a population of blood red jellyfish. Wise.

  6. #6
    OK, thank you, I learned a new thing
    TH 12, 43 years post

  7. #7
    Somewhat related - I'm presently listening to Nansen's account of his polar expedition in the 1890's. He mentions finding copious life in the sea under the arctic ice; at latitudes (at least) around 78 degrees.
    Cold water can hold much more oxygen than warm.
    Last edited by rfbdorf; 01-11-2010 at 04:55 PM. Reason: corrected the latitude!

  8. #8
    You don't know how small his boat was. You wouldn't believe it if you saw it
    TH 12, 43 years post

  9. #9
    I'd love to see the Fram. Nansen put a lot of thought into her design and fitting. Grand piano, windmill to generate electricity and all! He must have been quite a guy.

  10. #10
    It is a small museum in Oslo besides the museum for the viking ships. I have some of the books of Nansen after my father. He did a lot of other things too. Well, this is Norwegian history at school He even got the Nobel Peace prize

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fram_Museum
    TH 12, 43 years post

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