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Thread: Can a private company make a profit out of a cure for chronic SCI?

  1. #11
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paolocipolla View Post
    Here is a way I look at it.
    The cure is like a cake and many will get a part of it (big parma, rehab centers, hospitals, doctors). If we had a cure for SCI I'm not sure everyone gets a slice big enough to be happy. But consider that a cure for SCI will probaly be a cure also for other things like TBI etc. That makes the cake bigger.

    This is just a theory, can we prove that investing in SCI cure is also the perfect "entry gate" for the whole CNS???
    you are forgetting that the care for sci cake is much bigger than a cure cake. and the care cake will keep on giving for decades whereas the cure cake is a one time thing.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by DA View Post
    you are forgetting that the care for sci cake is much bigger than a cure cake. and the care cake will keep on giving for decades whereas the cure cake is a one time thing.
    Can you prove that with numbers?

    I think we have to play with numbers a bit and see if we can turn the situation in favor of the cure. If numbers are not enough will need to add someting else to the pod. Like a good salesman that can sell even useles things, so we have to sell our need for a cure.

  3. #13
    Spinal cord injuries come in many different flavors. For an acute injury such as mine, you would need to rejoin my spinal cord where my back was broken. If you could do that I am sure there are many other injuries that it would be applicable to, hence lots of money to be made.

  4. #14
    Senior Member rdf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paolocipolla View Post
    Can you prove that with numbers?

    I think we have to play with numbers a bit and see if we can turn the situation in favor of the cure. If numbers are not enough will need to add someting else to the pod. Like a good salesman that can sell even useles things, so we have to sell our need for a cure.
    It's well documented that for every penny spent on cure research, one dollar is spent on caring for those with sci. I don't know how you want to look at those numbers, but you would think the NIH would be allocating much more money towards a cure, being as how the government ends up paying for a lot of the money spent on care issues.

    If corporations are making so much money on having us stay paralyzed, if they cured us, they'd lose that huge consumer base. The trick is to focus on those companies not invested in the care market, so a cure wouldn't have any impact on their current and future bottom line.
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  5. #15
    Senior Member lunasicc42's Avatar
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    T8burst, I imagine you will be chronic by the time a cure comes... Juss sayin
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  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by lunasicc42 View Post
    T8burst, I imagine you will be chronic by the time a cure comes... Juss sayin
    Sadly you are correct. I was trying to differentiate my injury from someone who has a non accident caused injury like MS or Stenosis and wasn't clear. Too much chronic maybe

  7. #17
    Applying the current process in which sci cell therapy is being addressed, there will never (or not in decades) be a functional restoration for chronic injuries.

    Insanity is loosely defined as : Doing the same thing over and over again, but expecting a different outcome.

    One Example: Peer Review.

    You have a group of Doctors all with their huge egos and conflicting agendas reviewing each other work during peer review. Talking about a process that's a huge waste of time and resources. It's no wonder there is no progress being made.The market place is extremely efficient. It will decide whether the therapies are viable or not.

    1) Eliminate the current peer review system, or restructure it.

    2) Conduct fee based clinical trials were the patients that enroll pay a substantial fee. This fee is applied for the aggressive physical therapy after the fact. Thus eliminating any morality issues, charging patients for unproven cell therapies.

    Implementing these two ideas will cut time delays (for viable therapies) in half or more.

    There will be no profit until there are successful cell therapies. There will be no successful cell therapies until the process is changed.

    That was my point. In my previous post I was being facetious.

  8. #18
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by t8burst View Post
    Spinal cord injuries come in many different flavors. For an acute injury such as mine, you would need to rejoin my spinal cord where my back was broken. If you could do that I am sure there are many other injuries that it would be applicable to, hence lots of money to be made.
    it is january, you are no longer acute.

  9. #19
    Paolo,

    Consider the example of Acorda Therapeutics. While the drug (Fampridine) that they are working on was found to be applicable to multiple sclerosis, they did aim their efforts at treating chronic spinal cord injury first. The market sizes of spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis are similar. Acorda went public about 3 years ago and has since approached a billion-dollar in stock value.

    Wise.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    Paolo,

    Consider the example of Acorda Therapeutics. While the drug (Fampridine) that they are working on was found to be applicable to multiple sclerosis, they did aim their efforts at treating chronic spinal cord injury first. The market sizes of spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis are similar. Acorda went public about 3 years ago and has since approached a billion-dollar in stock value.

    Wise.
    Acorda does have a billion dollar market cap but they are not profitable.

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