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Thread: Fly Neuron Can Reprogram Itself After Injury

  1. #1

    Cool Fly Neuron Can Reprogram Itself After Injury

    wow, animals and insects are so much more capable than we are that sucks lol.

    Fly Neuron Can Reprogram Itself After Injury
    ScienceDaily (Dec. 11, 2009) — Studies with fruit flies have shown that the specialized nerve cells called neurons can rebuild themselves after injury.

    These results, potentially relevant to research efforts to improve the treatment of patients with traumatic nerve damage or neurodegenerative disease, were presented at the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) 49th Annual Meeting, Dec. 5-9, 2009 in San Diego.

    An injured neuron's remarkable ability to reprogram itself was reported by Michelle Stone, Melissa Rolls, Ph.D., and colleagues at Penn State University (PSU).

    The scientists said that the reprogramming was particularly surprising because once formed, neurons normally are relatively staid and stable, and because the injured part of the neuron was "replaced" by a very structurally and functionally different component of the same cell.

    more...

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...1206162951.htm

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    wow, animals and insects are so much more capable than we are that sucks lol.

    Fly Neuron Can Reprogram Itself After Injury
    ScienceDaily (Dec. 11, 2009) — Studies with fruit flies have shown that the specialized nerve cells called neurons can rebuild themselves after injury.

    These results, potentially relevant to research efforts to improve the treatment of patients with traumatic nerve damage or neurodegenerative disease, were presented at the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) 49th Annual Meeting, Dec. 5-9, 2009 in San Diego.

    An injured neuron's remarkable ability to reprogram itself was reported by Michelle Stone, Melissa Rolls, Ph.D., and colleagues at Penn State University (PSU).

    The scientists said that the reprogramming was particularly surprising because once formed, neurons normally are relatively staid and stable, and because the injured part of the neuron was "replaced" by a very structurally and functionally different component of the same cell.

    more...

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...1206162951.htm
    I am pretty sure that the same kind of plasticity occurs in injured mammalian (human) spinal cords. The fact that somatic neurons in the lumbar cord can convert themselves to activate bladder contraction and sphincter relaxation is a much more dramatic change of form and function than what was described here. Our brains and spinal cords are much more malleable and plastic that traditionally thought. There is a whole world of neuroscience still to study. Don't worry, not everything has been discovered yet. There is a lot more to find out and understand. Wise.

  3. #3

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    I am pretty sure that the same kind of plasticity occurs in injured mammalian (human) spinal cords. The fact that somatic neurons in the lumbar cord can convert themselves to activate bladder contraction and sphincter relaxation is a much more dramatic change of form and function than what was described here. Our brains and spinal cords are much more malleable and plastic that traditionally thought. There is a whole world of neuroscience still to study. Don't worry, not everything has been discovered yet. There is a lot more to find out and understand. Wise.


    Dr. Young, I like what you are saying, maybe our body is capable to cure our paralysis but we don't know exactly how to help our body and mind to do it. maybe you and the other scientist have it in your hands but you have to prove it by try it on us.

    my body and mind is ready to give it a try, manouli.

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