Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: Effort to Regenerate Damaged Spinal Cords Turns to New Model: Mexican Axolotl Salaman

  1. #1

    Effort to Regenerate Damaged Spinal Cords Turns to New Model: Mexican Axolotl Salaman

    Effort to Regenerate Damaged Spinal Cords Turns to New Model: Mexican Axolotl Salamander


    ScienceDaily (Dec. 9, 2009) — For more than 400 years, scientists have studied the amazing regenerative power of salamanders, trying to understand how these creatures routinely repair injuries that would usually leave humans and other mammals paralyzed -- or worse.

    Now, fueled by a highly competitive National Institutes of Health Grand Opportunity grant of $2.4 million, a multi-institutional team of researchers associated with the University of Florida McKnight Brain Institute's Regeneration Project has begun creating genomic tools necessary to compare the extraordinary regenerative capacity of the Mexican axolotl salamander with established mouse models of human disease and injury.

    Researchers want to find ways to tap unused human capacities to treat spinal cord injury, stroke, traumatic brain injury and other neural conditions, according to Edward Scott, principal investigator for the GO grant and director of the McKnight Brain Institute's Program in Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine.

    more...
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...1208214636.htm

  2. #2

    manouli

    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    Effort to Regenerate Damaged Spinal Cords Turns to New Model: Mexican Axolotl Salamander



    Now, fueled by a highly competitive National Institutes of Health Grand Opportunity grant of $2.4 million, a multi-institutional team of researchers associated with the University of Florida McKnight Brain Institute's Regeneration Project has begun creating genomic tools necessary to compare the extraordinary regenerative capacity of the Mexican axolotl salamander with established mouse models of human disease and injury.


    acities to treat spinal cord injury, stroke, traumatic brain injury and other neural conditions, according to Edward Scott, principal investigator for the GO grant and director of the McKnight Brain Institute's Program in Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine.

    more...R
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...1208214636.htm


    ScienceDaily (Dec. 9, 2009) — For more than 400 years, scientists have studied the amazing regenerative power of salamanders, trying to understand how these creatures routinely repair injuries that would usually leave humans and other mammals paralyzed -- or worse.

    THE DOCTORS THEN MUST HAVE HAD NO RATS TO WORK WITH

Similar Threads

  1. reduced effort steering changed to zero effort?
    By wheelman21 in forum Equipment
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-05-2006, 10:11 PM
  2. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-08-2005, 10:37 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-25-2005, 04:51 AM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-29-2003, 01:39 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-21-2002, 06:27 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •