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Thread: M&Ms Cure Spinal Cord Injury - Even if it doesn't it still tastes good

  1. #1

    M&Ms Cure Spinal Cord Injury - Even if it doesn't it still tastes good

    Saturday, October 24, 2009
    M&Ms Cure Spinal Cord Injury - Even if it doesn't it still tastes good


    In traumatic spinal cord injury, certain skins of molecules form a sugary coating, like m&ms, binding to the surface of neurons and keep nerve fibers from passing the damaged tissue, a necessary step to recovery,.


    A pill or two might be able to prevent future devastating spinal cord injuries from turning into paralysis, suggests new research on mice.

    n a traumatic spinal cord injury, certain skins of molecules — chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, or CSPGs, to be exact — bind to the surface of neurons and keep nerve fibers from passing the damaged tissue, a necessary step to recovery. This scarring can leave a victim permanently paralyzed and without significant hope for treatment, suggesting that if the scarring were blocked, nerve regeneration might be possible.


    more...
    http://sci-news-blog.blogspot.com/20...ven-if-it.html

  2. #2
    Senior Member lunasicc42's Avatar
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    so I gather this would be for acutes?
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  3. #3
    I eat a bag a week , nuttin going on.
    oh well

  4. #4
    sounds hinky to me.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli View Post
    Saturday, October 24, 2009
    M&Ms Cure Spinal Cord Injury - Even if it doesn't it still tastes good


    In traumatic spinal cord injury, certain skins of molecules form a sugary coating, like m&ms, binding to the surface of neurons and keep nerve fibers from passing the damaged tissue, a necessary step to recovery,.


    A pill or two might be able to prevent future devastating spinal cord injuries from turning into paralysis, suggests new research on mice.

    n a traumatic spinal cord injury, certain skins of molecules — chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, or CSPGs, to be exact — bind to the surface of neurons and keep nerve fibers from passing the damaged tissue, a necessary step to recovery. This scarring can leave a victim permanently paralyzed and without significant hope for treatment, suggesting that if the scarring were blocked, nerve regeneration might be possible.


    more...
    http://sci-news-blog.blogspot.com/20...ven-if-it.html
    I wish scientists and journalists would stop mangling science with their analogies to try to simplify things for the public. The article is referring to the observation that many molecules present in the extracellular space and binds to cell surfaces are glycoproteins, i.e. proteins with carbohydrate (sugar) component. Some of these repel axons. Chondroitin-6-sulfate-proteoglycan (CSPG) is an example of one that repels axons. Others attract and stick to cells.

    In any case, a scientist who was presenting the work used the analogy of M & M for these molecules. The journalist or blogger picked up this analogy and named the article after the analogy. I don't know which is worse, the state of science education in the United States or the attempts to dumb down science for people. People are not children. They understand words like molecules. They don't need to be given analogies like M & M's.

    This is not for acute or chronics. The work that this is all about, obscured by the journalist's fascination of the M & M analogy, is that Harvard scientists have discovered the receptor to chondroitin-6-sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG). As many people here are aware, CSPG is one of the extracellular matrix glycoproteins produced by astrocytes and that repel growing axons at the injury site.

    The receptor for CSPG was not known. The only treatment to eliminate CSPG was chondroitinase, a bacterial enzyme that breaks down CSPG. The discovery of the receptor that responds to CSPG allow the possibility of developing drugs that block the receptor. This does not mean that a drug can be taken orally for this purpose because CSPG is a ubiquitous material that define boundaries of tissues and organs. I am not sure that one can or should take a oral drug that blocks this particular receptor. A lot of research needs to be done before one can speculate on having an orally administered drug to stimulate spinal cord regeneration.

    On the other hand, it would be of interest to determine which intracellular messenger system mediates this receptors. It is likely to be rho-kinase and rho, the system that is blocked by Cethrin. If so, this means that Cethrin is effective for blocking the inhibitory effects of Nogo and CSPG. It would also be interesting to know which neurons express the receptors and at which times.

    Wise.

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