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Thread: Millionaire stockbroker campaigns for better NHS care for spinal injuries

  1. #1
    Senior Member Duran's Avatar
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    Millionaire stockbroker campaigns for better NHS care for spinal injuries

    Andy Stewart, 58, whose son Paul was told he would never walk again, has berated as "third-class" the facilities available on the NHS.

    He is now planning to campaign with charities to address the chronic underinvestment which he said is leaving Britain lagging behind other countries in the treatment of spinal injuries.

    Paul, 28, an entrepreneur, who lives with his girlfriend in Chelsea, west London, broke his back after getting caught up in an avalanche while snowboarding in the Alps last December.

    Following his son's accident, Stewart, who has an estimated fortune of £80 million, said he was prepared to spend every penny of his wealth to see him walk again.

    But after seeing the progress Paul has made he believes similar treatment, which is not widely available in the UK, ought to be available to everyone on the NHS.

    As part of his campaign he intends to publicise and help fund the latest developments in treatment.

    He said: "The NHS is third-class and totally inefficient. Why don't we understand in Britain what the top spinal researchers are doing? It's bonkers."

    He added: "I cannot change the world or the NHS but I can focus on people learning from the best spinal research around the world. The University of Miami is doing stem-cell research on guinea pigs, which could lead to a breakthrough in spinal research; we want to share this knowledge and make it available in the UK."


    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...-injuries.html
    2016

  2. #2
    The NHS is like Waffle House. Good food and cheap with it. But don't expect the best quality.

    I'm glad I had my SCI in the US. I'd recommend anyone thinking of having an SCI to do it in the US too....

  3. #3
    Senior Member Timaru's Avatar
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    What is it that people find so difficult about the concept of "return"?.........

    "Doctors at the facility told him to prepare for life in a wheelchair as he would never walk again.

    But after turning to private specialists, first in this country and then the United States, he has made remarkable progress and has already regained some mobility, allowing him to walk with just the aid of a stick.

    Paul underwent intensive therapy at the privately run Royal Buckinghamshire hospital and then transferred to a unit in Florida.

    He spent two months in America undergoing groundbreaking treatment and cutting edge physiotherapy."

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...-injuries.html

    ...............it was hard work combined with good luck that got him walking again and yes that kind of physiotherapy is available on the NHS.

  4. #4
    I agree with that too. My right leg is not nearly as "returned" as my left. Is that because I focused all my effort and work on the left? Of course not. It's just a fluke of the way the spine was damaged.

    The reason this guy can walk is 99% return that would have happened anyway.


    My comments about the NHS were really directed towards the quality of my initial surgery. The surgeon was at UAB in Birmongham Alabama. When I took my x-rays to the surgeon at the Rehab center (Sheperd in Atlanta), he shook his head and said "wow, they used some advanced techniques on you, that surgery was high risk cutting edge stuff, I'm relieved it worked well for you..." I firmly believe that the "advanced" surgery I received helped prevent any more damage, thus alowing me to enjoy the return I have now.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by MarkB701 View Post
    The NHS is like Waffle House. Good food and cheap with it. But don't expect the best quality.

    I'm glad I had my SCI in the US. I'd recommend anyone thinking of having an SCI to do it in the US too....
    You are kidding? I'm not doubting US care, just the cost. And the fact that many don't seem to get great rehab. Unless they pay for it.

    '28 year old Chelsea entrepreneur' = opinionated, successful guy, didn't want to wait around, had the cash to try anything. Understandable.

    I saw plenty of people who showed ANY return whatsoever given plenty of treatment and opportunity within the NHS.

    However, the NHS is a big machine. Stoke Mandeville - which I presume is where his son went - doesn't come with a sparkling recommendation from some UK CC members.
    C5/6 incomplete

    "I assume you all have guns and crack....."

  6. #6
    I hope he doesn't end up throwing his money away on the quacks in a vain attempt at an individual cure.
    - Richard

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by RehabRhino View Post
    You are kidding? I'm not doubting US care, just the cost. And the fact that many don't seem to get great rehab. Unless they pay for it.
    What is cost of care in the US vs the UK?

  8. #8
    Senior Member Timaru's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LooseCannon View Post
    What is cost of care in the US vs the UK?
    In the UK it's free but we do pay more income tax to cover the cost.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Timaru View Post
    In the UK it's free but we do pay more income tax to cover the cost.
    The cost is paid for with tax payer money, but there is still cost.

    RR seemed to have figures on the cost differences between the US and UK.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by LooseCannon View Post
    What is cost of care in the US vs the UK?
    I was told the care I received on the NHS was close to £1m if accounted privately.

    As Timaru said, it is funded by taxation.
    C5/6 incomplete

    "I assume you all have guns and crack....."

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