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Thread: Going Home

  1. #1

    Going Home

    This is my first post. My son is 20 years old and is a C4-C5 quad. We have been rehabbing at Craig Hospital since August 4th and are scheduled to go home on November 19th. I have to be honest, I am scared to death. Craig has done a great job of educating both of us, but I feel as though we are living in a "bubble world" here.

    Please tell me we will survive the flight on the commercial airline, his power chair will make the road trip home and we will survive this transition!!!

  2. #2
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    Yes, yes, and yes, to all of your questions, although anyone here can certainly understand and empathize with your worries. It is a huge transition, and parts of it will basically have to be figured out as issues come up, but you will get there, and it sounds as though your son is very good at sharing what he is learning at Craig with the rest of your family. Ask for a seat immediately withing the airplane door, although they will not usually let you have the first row because it is the bulkhead seat and is thought of as the emergency escape. Row two or three is fine. They will put him in a transfer chair (narrow enough to fit in the plane aise) and bring him to his seat. Make sure they fasten the straps on his waist and chest correctly. Usually the armrests lift up to make a sliding transfer possible, but they will help no matter what. They should pre-board him, although that occasionally gets screwed up, which just means he has to have everyone watch instead of being able to do it in relative privacy. When you reach your destination this whole thing will be reversed. Take off spare parts of the chair that might get lost......cushions, bags, whatever, and keep them with you. Make sure the chair is tagged for gate delivery, meaning they will bring it right to the plane for him to get back into. I am a C5/6 and have flown many, many times, including all over Europe. It works pretty well, actually. Get him online here if he is up to it. We are a friendly bunch (OK, maybe not the political forum and will be happy to talk to him and you too. Keep asking questions as your need to. You will survive, although at times it will feel like a test, but then I am sure that has been a bit of a feature since August anyways. I wish you all the best. How wonderful that he is coming home. Keep asking anything at all, really.

  3. #3
    Senior Member rdf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jloney View Post
    This is my first post. My son is 20 years old and is a C4-C5 quad. We have been rehabbing at Craig Hospital since August 4th and are scheduled to go home on November 19th. I have to be honest, I am scared to death. Craig has done a great job of educating both of us, but I feel as though we are living in a "bubble world" here.

    Please tell me we will survive the flight on the commercial airline, his power chair will make the road trip home and we will survive this transition!!!
    You'll all survive, and you can come here to find things out. This website is a treasure for the newly injured and their loved ones. If you have any problems or questions, please come here and post them. Whatever it is, someone here has dealt with it and can give advice.

    Good luck to your son, and your family.
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    Thanks!

  4. #4
    Next week will be one year since my 18 year old son had an accident resulting in being a T-5 para. We were at Shepherd in Atlanta for several months. I can remember feeling so anxious to get home but so scared of leaving the bubble. Believe me when I say, it will be okay. Work together, try different approaches to situations and maintain a sense of humor. We took what we learned at Shepherd and modified some things to better fit our particular situation. The first 6 months were spent winding through the maze of Medicaid, Social Security, Supplies, Insurance, in addition to the daily needs. I had so much trouble finding catheters the first month that we joke now about how mom "scored" catheters. We learned to let my son tell us when he needed help; he maintained as much independence as possible. He is a freshman in college now (5 hours away from me). Life has gone on for him and our family and although we took a drastic turn, we never stopped moving forward. This forum will be your lifeline. I have always found my answers here and some questions, too! Good luck and please, let me know if I can be of any help anytime.

  5. #5
    Senior Member skippy13's Avatar
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    Welcome to Care cure. I recommend putting Care cure on your favorites list. It is comforting to know that you can connect with others in your situation almost around the clock. Best of luck and a trouble free homecoming to you.
    Anything worth doing, is worth doing to excess

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