Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Rat Study Shows Promise in Eventual Paralysis Treatment

  1. #1

    Rat Study Shows Promise in Eventual Paralysis Treatment

    Rat Study Shows Promise in Eventual Paralysis Treatment
    Delayed Treatment of Spinal Injuries Could One Day Be Practical, Researchers Say
    By DR. JUDY NEE
    ABC News Medical Unit
    Oct. 29, 2009

    Ten or fifteen years ago, if any one of the 6 million people estimated to be living with paralysis searched for treatment, they would likely have found hope in short supply. More often than not, they were told their condition was permanent.
    Research since then has shown that if the damage from spinal cord injuries is dealt with immediately, there may be hope that some patients can avoid total paralysis. But if treatment is delayed, the chances of success quickly dwindle.

    Now, in an unprecedented new study from the University of California, San Diego, published Wednesday in the journal Neuron, researchers say they were able to regenerate nerve cells up to 15 months after a spinal cord injury.

    "All studies in the past have been right after the injury, but with a quarter million [people with chronic spinal injury], we needed a study that looked at re-growth one year after," said Dr. Mark H. Tuszynski, director of the Center for Neural Repair at UCSD and one of the authors of the study. "We found one can achieve this at impressive delays."


    Only Preliminary, Only in Rats So Far
    But like much of the other current paralysis research, this finding is only preliminary. The study was conducted only in rats -- so it is hard to say how it may apply to people. And while the data is promising, doctors specializing in spinal cord injury caution that this is at least a decade away from being rolled out as therapy for humans.

    Moreover, the trial at hand was largely a test run; the nerves that the researchers regenerated in the rats were picked because they would be the most easy to study and simplest to re-grow. Additionally, while the nerves that were studied re-grew, they did not connect to the brain in the way needed to restore sensory or motor function.


    1 |
    2 |
    3
    NEXT >

    http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Wellnes...ory?id=8939148

  2. #2
    Senior Member lunasicc42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lutz, Fl USA*********C456
    Posts
    2,288
    YAY!!! Finally a method that enabled rats to walk!!!

    Wait? Isn't there like 5 methods to make rats walk? Enough with the rats already!
    "That's not smog! It's SMUG!! " - randy marsh, southpark

    "what???? , you don't 'all' wear a poop sac?.... DAMNIT BONNIE, YOU LIED TO ME ABOUT THE POOP SAC!!!! "


    2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member
    Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

  3. #3

    Rodent of the Week: Axons regenerate long after injury

    http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/boos...rd-rodent.html
    Rodent of the Week: Axons regenerate long after injury

    October 30, 2009 | 1:00 pm

    Rodent Scientists have been working for more than a decade on methods to treat spinal cord injuries by attempting to regrow injured nerves. Some success has been achieved in animals that are treated immediately after the injury.

    However, new research shows it's possible to coax the regeneration of nerve axons in rats as long as a year after injury. Axons are the part of the nerve that carries signals away from the nerve body. In the experiment, researchers were able to stimulate the growth of axons in the damaged part of the spinal cord and somewhat beyond the site.

    It's difficult to get injured axons to grow because of scar tissue at the injury site, inflammation and chemical processes that inhibit the growth. Thus, the treatment was dependent on a complex and sophisticated process that included a cellular bridge to the injury site, a nervous-system growth factor to guide axons to the correct target and a stimulus to the injured neurons that turns on genes to promote growth.

    Using this formula, researchers were able to demonstrate successful regeneration of axons. Rats that did not receive the full combination treatment did not exhibit growth.

    "The good news is that when axons have been cut due to spinal cord injury, they can be coaxed to regenerate if a combination of treatments is applied," the lead author of the study, Dr. Mark Tuszynski of UC San Diego, said in a news release. "The chronically injured axon is not dead.

    "While the regenerating axons grow for relatively short distances, even this degree of growth could be useful. For example, restoration of nerve function even one level below an injury in the neck might improve movement of a wrist or hand, providing greater quality of life or independence."

    The study is published in the journal Neuron.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by lunasicc42 View Post
    YAY!!! Finally a method that enabled rats to walk!!!

    Wait? Isn't there like 5 methods to make rats walk? Enough with the rats already!
    LOL. But these aren't any ordinary rats, they be CHRONIC rats!
    Man, I remember when being chronic meant something else. Good times.
    ______
    Awe at my magnificent coq!

    "You may say I'm a dreamer
    but I'm not" - J. Lennon

  5. #5
    Here is a copy of the article that was published in Neuron magazine

    Click the attachment to view the article

  6. #6
    And here's a friend of mine who's hat we can borrow.

  7. #7
    es this is exciting as more and more credible testing is divulging new expectations for chronic conditions; Dr. Young's treatment this upcoming year is geared to chronic conditions. UCSD AND UCI have credible programs and results that lead the programs to go further with human testing. The tunnel is open and this is where enrgy on this board should be focused.

  8. #8
    Senior Member lunasicc42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lutz, Fl USA*********C456
    Posts
    2,288
    That's the coolest hat ive ever seen
    "That's not smog! It's SMUG!! " - randy marsh, southpark

    "what???? , you don't 'all' wear a poop sac?.... DAMNIT BONNIE, YOU LIED TO ME ABOUT THE POOP SAC!!!! "


    2010 SCINet Clinical Trial Support Squad Member
    Please join me and donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org and copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature

Similar Threads

  1. Progesterone shows promise as treatment for TBI
    By roshni in forum Brain Injury & Stroke Research
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-04-2008, 04:16 AM
  2. New Treatment for Glaucoma Shows Promise in Laboratory
    By Wise Young in forum Science, Medicine, & Technology
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-04-2007, 03:04 AM
  3. Herbal Treatment Shows Promise Against Prostate Cancer
    By Max in forum Health & Science News
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-23-2002, 09:43 AM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-23-2002, 11:57 PM
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-10-2002, 01:10 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •