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Thread: Enormous ignoramuses in our society

  1. #1

    Enormous ignoramuses in our society

    Hello everyone, I recently (last night) felt saddened and surprised by some postings on a forum where the casual mentioning of the word “disability” sparked an unwanted and negative criticism from a few people.

    Back story:
    Mr. Tony Lee, a successful comic book writer, introduced himself on the DC Comics message board. Someone called him an "arrogant lame-tard" for listing all his accomplishments and work. I wrote:

    “I think it's great for Tony to show off his accomplishments! Why not, he's worked hard and earned it! It just shows that he is proud of his accomplishments! I do too... that is why I always start my intro with my name, my disability and all my accomplishments... it's not for reasons of "arrogant lame-tard" but I believe it's to inspire and encourage others!”

    Continuing…
    The response started off with:

     that is why I always
    > start my intro with my name, my disability and all my
    > accomplishments... it's not for reasons of "arrogant
    > lame-tard" but I believe it's to inspire and
    > encourage others!

    Either wait it doesn't matter. It still makes you look like one.

    And as for stating that you have a disability before everything.... that's incredibly lame. No disability in the world is going to "inspire" or "excite" people if your work is cr@p. Having a disability does not give you credibility, and furthermore, being a writer and disabled myself (more of a disorder, really), you have offended me greatly by even suggesting this. Trust me, you are not doing yourself any favors by listing your disability.

     I'm going to have to kudos GD on this one. Playing the disability card is like playing the race card, except worse, because somehow people are supposed to feel guilty and accommodating for something. Qualifications are qualifications.

    (to read the threads, checkout http://dcboards.warnerbros.com/web/t...rt=45&tstart=0)

    The focus of my message is “accomplishments” (I only mentioned it 3 times) but people zoned in on the word “disability” instead. My disability is part of my normal life. I never put a second thought to it when I introduce myself and my disability. To me, it’s like mentioning my long black hair, it’s who I am.

    My questions to everyone are:

    Do you disclose your disability when you introduce yourself to others?

    What is your reason(s) for including or not including your disability?

    What types of responds did you receive?

    Why do some people in our society automatically goes from the word “disability” to wanting people to feel guilty and accommodation?

    No wonder we are having such a hard time making changes in our society and community. What are your million $ ideas or suggestions on how to make change?
    "Always look at the bright side of life...."

  2. #2
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    If I am meeting someone in person my disability is very apparent. If I am talking to someone on the phone and there is no pertinent reason for them to know I have a disability I do not mention. I don't mention it just because it isn't relevant in lots of situations, anymore than the person on the other end of the phone telling me they wear glasses or are tall/short/fat/thin/blue-eyed or whatever.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by ChinaDoll View Post
    Having a disability does not give you credibility, and furthermore, being a writer and disabled myself (more of a disorder, really), you have offended me greatly by even suggesting this.
    I don't see it as "offensive" per se, but I do agree that in most instances, I don't believe that a disability gives an individual credibility in general. I would need to know one's specific circumstances, not just that they were an amputee or had a SCI or CP or whatever.

    The focus of my message is “accomplishments” (I only mentioned it 3 times) but people zoned in on the word “disability” instead. My disability is part of my normal life. I never put a second thought to it when I introduce myself and my disability. To me, it’s like mentioning my long black hair, it’s who I am.
    But do you mention that you have long, black hair when listing your accomplishments? My having a disability is so inherent to me that I can't imagine mentioning it when speaking about my accomplishments or positive characteristics. Describing myself overall, sure. I would say that I am a Mexican woman with a disability who honours the old gods and go from there. Those are all things that matter TO ME and that I know have shaped my personality and view of the world, but that I don't expect anyone else to cheer or jeer for (even though I know they will).

    Do you disclose your disability when you introduce yourself to others?
    The only time that I have ever felt the need to mention that I use a wheelchair to someone that I had never met was when I was chatting with a guy online and the conversation became flirtatious and we decided to meet IRL. He was a leg man and I thought it would be weird to not mention it before we met.

    What is your reason(s) for including or not including your disability?
    Are you talking about non-visual communication? I certainly can't imagine mentioning my disability when I am face to face with someone. The 20 lbs of titanium I'm sitting on seem pretty obvious to me. Speaking to people online, in print or over the phone, I have never felt the need to mention my disability as a matter of course. On a day to day basis, it's not terribly relevant to anything that I may discuss with a stranger or new friend unless it is something specific to having a disability. I would never use it as background for anything I've accomplished in my life other than dealing with the original injury and rehabilitation.

    Why do some people in our society automatically goes from the word “disability” to wanting people to feel guilty and accommodation?
    Depends on the context. Accommodation should have nothing to do with guilt, but I have heard some people talk about their disabilities in a way that sounded like they should get extra credit for things that I don't believe deserve it. I'm not saying that there are no situations where it is obvious that an individual has overcome much, much greater obstacles than the average person. Of course there are, but, for instance, my paraplegia would be a weak excuse for anything I've failed to accomplish, so I shouldn't really get extra credit for what I have done.

    More severe disabilities would factor differently.

    C.

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