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Thread: Going from SSI to SSDI

  1. #1
    Senior Member teesieme's Avatar
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    Going from SSI to SSDI

    For many years now my son and I were led to believe, told repeatedly that my son's past employment along with his recent employment would eventually complete the quarters needed to qualify for SSDI this year. This came from the Social Security office and it's administration both in Texas and Minnesota.

    So the time had come with the advice and what have you from these people that my son checked in to see where he was actually at with his quarters working the timeframe they had guesstimated he would meet the criteria to actually be able to make some money while being in need of medicaid, eventually qualifying for medicare, etc. And guess what?

    They told him he has many years to go, blah, blah, blah.

    I am a bit more than peeved. It's been awhile since I've done some serious checking into with this as last year, in Texas, I finally felt that we had enough consistent agreement the past so many years on what was what and advised my son, to keep at it, in order to gain he would have to lose, etc. etc.

    So what's the truth with this? Did they change something in the last year when it comes to fulfilling quarters or the amount needed to qualify or what the hell happened here?

    I would like for my son to have the opportunity as others with disabilities have being on SSDI, being able to work and make some money instead of this bullshit where after a little under a hundred is made, they start taking $1 for every $2 and still qualify for some type of medical coverage... what gives?
    "I want to make a difference! However small it may be~ as long as it's a positive one, then this is what my life will have been about and I will go knowing I did my best.~ T.

  2. #2
    i'm a little confused. has your son been working just enough so he can still get SSI? i imagine that is an issue, if so. how about ticket to work program?

    i know ssa's redbook can be hard to read, but here is its link and it is one of your best resources in talking to ssa workers, imo. make them cite it.

    http://www.ssa.gov/redbook/eng/redbook.pdf

  3. #3
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    I didn't start collecting SSDI until I had worked non-stop for 31 years, and that was because I had to, not because I wanted to, so I am confused by your post too.

  4. #4
    Senior Member skippy13's Avatar
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    There are different qualification levels that are adjusted by age. I do have the figs handy, but only us old folks are required to have 40 quarters to qualify, so he may indeed be qualified under the number of quarters associated with his age.

    The SS Blue book (SS Publication No. 05-10029 Aug 2009 ICN456000) lists the quarters needed for workers and their corresponding ages.

    Social Security pays benefits to people who cannot work because they have a medical condition that is expected to last at least one year or result in death. Federal law requires this very strict definition of disability. While some programs give money to people with partial disability or short-term disability, Social Security does not.
    Certain family members of disabled workers also can receive money from Social Security.
    How do I meet the earnings requirement for disability benefits?



    In general, to get disability benefits, you must meet two different earnings tests:
    1. A “recent work” test based on your age at the time you became disabled; and
    2. A “duration of work” test to show that you worked long enough under Social Security.
    Certain blind workers have to meet only the “duration of work” test.
    The table below, shows the rules for how much work you need for the “recent work” test based on your age when your disability began. The rules in this table are based on the calendar quarter in which you turned or will turn a certain age.
    The calendar quarters are:
    First Quarter: January 1 through March 31
    Second Quarter: April 1 through June 30
    Third Quarter: July 1 through September 30
    Fourth Quarter: October 1 through December 31
    Rules for work needed for the “recent work test”
    If you become disabled... Then you generally need: In or before the quarter you turn age 24, 1.5 years of work during the three-year period ending with the quarter your disability began.

    In the quarter after you turn age 24 but before the quarter you turn age 31, work during half the time for the period beginning with the quarter after you turned 21 and ending with the quarter you became disabled.

    Example: If you become disabled in the quarter you turned age 27, then you would need three years of work out of the six-year period ending with the quarter you became disabled.
    In the quarter you turn age 31 or later, work during five years out of the 10-year period ending with the quarter your disability began.


    The following table shows examples of how much work you need to meet the “duration of work test” if you become disabled at various selected ages. For the “duration of work” test, your work does not have to fall within a certain period of time.
    NOTE: This table does not cover all situations.
    Examples of work needed for the “duration of work" test

    If you become disabled... Then you generally need:
    Before age 28, 1.5 years of work
    Age 30 2 years
    Age 34 3 years
    Age 38 4 years
    Age 42 5 years
    Age 44 5.5 years
    Age 46 6 years
    Age 48 6.5 years
    Age 50 7 years
    Age 52 7.5 years
    Age 54 8 years
    Age 56 8.5 years
    Age 58 9 years
    Age 60 9.5 years

    I hope this is helpful. I did not know that there were different rules for different ages, but of course there must be. How do you explain a young serviceman coming home with injuries that qualify him for SSDI? Thought I'd look it up. There it was.
    Last edited by skippy13; 10-23-2009 at 11:09 PM. Reason: putting the table into english
    Anything worth doing, is worth doing to excess

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by skippy13 View Post
    There are different qualification levels that are adjusted by age. I don't have the figs handy, but only us old folks are required to have 40 quarters to qualify, so he may indeed be qualified under the number of quarters associated with his age. It is in one of the SS "color" books. Not the red book, but hthe blue or the brown ( can not remember) whichever one exists.
    really? i didn't think age had anything to do w/it. i was injured at 30. had ssdi. thought it was only work quarters.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by cass View Post
    really? i didn't think age had anything to do w/it. i was injured at 30. had ssdi. thought it was only work quarters.
    You can only collect SSDI if you have enough quarters (the # of quarters depends on what age you become disabled) and also whether you were working at the time you became disabled.

    http://www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/10029.pdf

    Page 6.

    In or before the quarter you turn 24. 1.5 years of work during the three-year period ending with the quarter your disability began.

    In the quarter after you turn age 24 but before the quarter you turn 31. Work during half the time for the period beginning with the quarter after you turned 21 and ending with the quarter you became disabled. Example: If you become disabled in the quarter you turned age 27, then you would need 3 years of work out of the six-year period ending with the quarter you became disabled.

    In the quarter you turn age 31 or later. Work during five years out of the ten-year period ending with the quarter your disability began.
    Daniel

  7. #7
    Senior Member skippy13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cass View Post
    really? i didn't think age had anything to do w/it. i was injured at 30. had ssdi. thought it was only work quarters.

    I found my reference. I was lazy when I first posted and then you got to it before I had a chance to edit the darn thing. Dang girl you are fast!
    Anything worth doing, is worth doing to excess

  8. #8
    Senior Member skippy13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan_nc View Post
    You can only collect SSDI if you have enough quarters (the # of quarters depends on what age you become disabled) and also whether you were working at the time you became disabled.

    http://www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/10029.pdf

    Page 6.

    In or before the quarter you turn 24. 1.5 years of work during the three-year period ending with the quarter your disability began.

    In the quarter after you turn age 24 but before the quarter you turn 31. Work during half the time for the period beginning with the quarter after you turned 21 and ending with the quarter you became disabled. Example: If you become disabled in the quarter you turned age 27, then you would need 3 years of work out of the six-year period ending with the quarter you became disabled.

    In the quarter you turn age 31 or later. Work during five years out of the ten-year period ending with the quarter your disability began.

    Thanks Dan, you knew what I was talking about even befor I could get it into a coherent format.
    Anything worth doing, is worth doing to excess

  9. #9
    Senior Member teesieme's Avatar
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    Thank you everyone. My son did have a few years of working prior his accident at 18, one week before his graduation... then he did work for awhile, four, six months prior his attending a trade school. He graduated and began working thereafter in the field he went to school for. He is now 25.

    We were told in 2008 at the Social Security office, if he were to continue working another year (this was last May/June) thus going into 2009 he would have enough quarters in by then to qualify for SSDI.

    Now, he is being told differently.

    This is one SS person version vs four others with similar outcome date throughout the years... how in the heck does a person know who is right?
    "I want to make a difference! However small it may be~ as long as it's a positive one, then this is what my life will have been about and I will go knowing I did my best.~ T.

  10. #10
    I'd get an SSI lawyer.

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