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Thread: Nobel Prize talk abounds over two Toronto stem cell scientists

  1. #1
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    Nobel Prize talk abounds over two Toronto stem cell scientists

    Toronto scientists are leaders in stem cell research area.

    Nobel buzz surrounds Toronto scientists
    October 3, 2009
    Megan Ogilvie
    Joseph Hall

    The hope – and signs – are there!

    This may well be the year of the Nobel for two Toronto scientists, whose work began on a Sunday afternoon in 1960 when Ernest McCulloch peered down in surprise at a newly dissected mouse

    There were lumps on its spleen, clumps of cells that had formed in the 10 days since the mouse had been injected with blood-forming bone marrow. McCulloch – and his partner James Till – saw promise in these strange nodules embedded in the slick, tiny organ.

    And so the pair embarked on a set of remarkable and rigorous experiments that proved the existence of stem cells – a feat that now, almost half a century later, may finally garner them the coveted Nobel Prize in Medicine on Monday.

    No one outside the Nobel committee knows who will get the early morning phone call from Sweden. But there's a buzz in the medical community that Till and McCulloch will be the first Canadians to win the Nobel for medicine since Frederick Banting and J.R.R. Macleod. They took home the prize in 1923 for their discovery of insulin.

    Top scientists have lobbied on their behalf. The prize can't be awarded posthumously, and for the pair – McCulloch is 83 and Till is 78 – time is running out. They have taken home every other major medical prize, including the 2005 Lasker Award, which is said to predict who will capture a Nobel

    And there is the almost universal agreement that Till and McCulloch, known as the fathers of stem cell science, are long overdue to win the world's top scientific prize

    "Without question, they are very deserving of a Nobel Prize," says Alan Bernstein, an internationally renowned scientist who heads the Global HIV Vaccine Initiative in New York.

    "What's unequivocal is that it was Till and McCulloch who discovered stem cells."
    more at ... http://www.healthzone.ca/health/news...article/704864

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  2. #2
    The Nobel Prize went to three Americans, for their discovery on how chromosomes protect themselves during cell division.

    Wise.

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/...LAj-QD9B55DS03

    3 Americans share Nobel medicine prize
    By MALCOLM RITTER (AP) – 13 minutes ago
    NEW YORK — Three Americans won the Nobel prize in medicine on Monday for discovering how chromosomes protect themselves as cells divide, work that has inspired experimental cancer therapies and may offer insights into aging.
    The research by Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Carol W. Greider and Jack W. Szostak revealed the workings of chromosome features called telomeres, which play an important role in the aging of cells.
    It's the first time two women have shared in a single Nobel science prize. Over the years, a total of 10 women have won the prize in medicine.
    Blackburn, 60, who holds U.S. and Australian citizenship, is a professor of biology and physiology at the University of California, San Francisco. Greider, 48, is a professor in the department of molecular biology and genetics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore.
    London-born Szostak, 56, is a professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School and a researcher with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.
    Their work, done in the 1970s and 1980s, showed how features at the tips of chromosomes — telomeres (TEE-loh-meers) — can keep them from getting progressively shorter as cells divide. It's been compared to the way plastic tips on the ends of shoelaces keep the laces from fraying.
    Blackburn and Greider discovered an enzyme, telomerase (teh-LAH-meh-race), that maintains the lengths of the telomeres. Later research has shown that telomerase is switched on in almost all cancers.
    Telomerase is active before birth, when cells are dividing rapidly. By age 4 or 5 it's basically shut off in almost all cells. That means the telomeres degrade over time, leading those cells to age and eventually stop dividing. But scientists have shown that adding telomerase to human cells can extend their lifespan indefinitely.
    Such research spurred speculation that telomerase might turn out to be a fountain of youth. But experts say that aging is more complicated than just changes in telomeres. Scientists are still studying what impact telomeres might have; perhaps they will reveal ways to ward off some aspects of aging, researchers say.
    Still other work showed that telomerase helps cancer cells sustain their uncontrolled growth. Scientists are trying to exploit that to produce new therapies, noted Jerry Shay of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.
    The farthest along is a vaccine-like approach, which trains the immune system to home in on telomerase as a way to identify and attack cancerous cells. Other approaches attempt to use it as a signal that activates a cell-killing virus, or to devise a drug to block the enzyme's effect, he said.
    Shay said he believes some kind of telomerase-based cancer treatment will become available within four years.
    Monday's prize "is totally well-deserved," Shay said. "These people were clearly the forerunners of what is now becoming a much stronger field that has lots of interesting questions, (and that is) likely to have a major importance in medicine in the future."
    The prize includes $1.4 million, split among the three winners.
    Szostak, meeting with reporters, joked that he might use the money to send his two elementary school-age children to college. "They might like that," he quipped.
    As for his work on telomeres, Szostak decided "it was time to move on" to another field. His current research is focused on the origins of life.
    At a news conference in San Francisco, Blackburn joked that she had gone through the five stages of happiness after the phone rang in the middle of the night. "I went through, `Where's the phone?' to disbelief to dazed to, 'I think it's sinking in now," to, `I'm just so happy.'"
    Greider, in Baltimore, said she was telephoned just before 5 a.m. with the news that she had won.
    "It's really very thrilling, it's something you can't expect," she told The Associated Press by telephone.
    Later, she said the award was "really a tribute to curiosity-driven basic science."
    Nobel judges say women are underrepresented in Nobel statistics because the award-winning research often dates back several decades to a time when science was dominated by men. Still, critics say the judges aren't looking hard enough for deserving women candidates.
    The Nobel Prizes in physics, chemistry, literature and the Nobel Peace Prize will be announced later this week, while the economics award will be presented on Oct. 12.
    Associated Press Writers Rodrique Ngowi in Boston, Sarah Brumfield and Alex Dominguez in Baltimore, Mary Hudetz in Phoenix, and Malin Rising in Stockholm contributed to this report.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    The Nobel Prize went to three Americans, for their discovery on how chromosomes protect themselves during cell division.

    Wise.

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/...LAj-QD9B55DS03
    By the Scandinavians

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    The Nobel Prize went to three Americans, for their discovery on how chromosomes protect themselves during cell division.

    Wise.

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/...LAj-QD9B55DS03
    I saw this first thing this A.M.. I was rooting for the stem cell researchers and not because they were from the "socialistland". It would have been an amazing boost toward having the world better understand the importance of stem cells.

    William

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    We are the real winners

    Quote Originally Posted by wheelchairTITAN View Post
    I saw this first thing this A.M.. I was rooting for the stem cell researchers and not because they were from the "socialistland". It would have been an amazing boost toward having the world better understand the importance of stem cells.


    Clearly, we all win as cell research continues throughout the world. No matter who wins the prizes or gets credit, scientists worldwide will continue to make breakthroughs. Everybody wins the benefits of research everywhere. It's the collective process we can celebrate, regardless of borders. And to those who do not win prizes, I tip my hat. Keep up the good work.

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    Senior Member BigK's Avatar
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    I would like to see something huge gained from stemcells before they start handing out prizes. This is why nothing is getting done with stemcells yet, scientists have huge egos and no one wants to come together and collaberate with each other and share their knowledge because they don't want to share their recognition.
    Ken

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigK View Post
    I would like to see something huge gained from stemcells before they start handing out prizes. This is why nothing is getting done with stemcells yet, scientists have huge egos and no one wants to come together and collaberate with each other and share their knowledge because they don't want to share their recognition.
    Check last year, brain.

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    Senior Member BigK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leif View Post
    Check last year, brain.
    Wow, and I thought AdiChicago was a Douche. Notice no one here can stand you or takes you seriously anymore?
    Ken

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigK View Post
    Wow, and I thought AdiChicago was a Douche. Notice no one here can stand you or takes you seriously anymore?
    Get out of the hyper-box and check reality – check last year, or better 2007. Wasn’t ’07 huge as you say? Do you know what you ask for, or do you simply do not pay attention? Attack me for not being serious, it might do you good…

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    One of the better parts of this award is that Elizabeth Blackburn was fired by George W. Bush for being critical of his stance on stem cells. GEEK REVENGE is a sweet thing. GWB is now a has been looser and she wins the Noble Prize......yay!

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