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Thread: Getting stem cells to the lesion site without surgery

  1. #1

    Getting stem cells to the lesion site without surgery

    From Kate's blog

    .....image on the screen of a demyelinated multipel sclerosis cord. it's pocketed with holes. so the problem is how to deal with all those lesions? can't be sticking a needle into a cord or brain 40 times.

    so they have developed a protein that makes cells traveling through the blood bind to the kind of receptors that will get them to into the nervous system.

    this is very cool. no surgery!


    I think this is very interesting also for SCI, anybody can say something more about that?

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by paolocipolla View Post
    From Kate's blog

    .....image on the screen of a demyelinated multipel sclerosis cord. it's pocketed with holes. so the problem is how to deal with all those lesions? can't be sticking a needle into a cord or brain 40 times.

    so they have developed a protein that makes cells traveling through the blood bind to the kind of receptors that will get them to into the nervous system.

    this is very cool. no surgery!


    I think this is very interesting also for SCI, anybody can say something more about that?
    Paolo,

    In MS, cells do enter the central nervous system. In fact, the disease may have a propensity to affect people that allow cells to enter more readily into the central nervous system. One of the treatments for MS is Tysabri, an antibody that reduces entry of white blood cells into the central nervous system.

    How cells get into the central nervous system is not understood. Normally, the brain and spinal cord have little or no lymphocytes in them. The cerebrospinal fluid normally has no inflammatory cells. However, after an injury, an MS exacerbation, or infection/inflammation, the cerebrospinal fluid is filled with cells.

    We know that the blood brain barrier breaks down rapidly (within minutes) after a traumatic injury. In MS, inflammation in demyelinating zones are often associated with broken blood brain barrier and invasion of peripheral blood cells into the central nervous system. In such situations, we know that peripheral cells readily enter into the spinal cord.

    However, when we have injected umbilical cord blood and neural stem cells into the circulation of rats with normal spinal cords or chronic spinal cords, we have seen little or not cells enter the spinal cord. For this reason, we believe that it is necessary in our first clinical trials to inject the cells directly into the spinal cord.

    Wise.

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