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Thread: For Dr Young

  1. #21
    Senior Member soonerborn's Avatar
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    Dr. Young

    You said to not sit around and wait. What can I do or what should I be doing to try to regain function?

    I was sent home 5 weeks after my accident. 2 weeks in the hospital and 3 in rehab. Nothing as far as rehab since then besides the little workouts I do for the last 2 years. A friend gave me a standing frame but its not the best. lol.

    Should I find a rehab facility and find out what that can possible give me? If so do you know a good facility in Oklahoma near Oklahoma City?

    I just don't know the direction to start moving in yet. lol.

    Thanks in advance and for the work you are doing!

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by soonerborn View Post
    Dr. Young

    You said to not sit around and wait. What can I do or what should I be doing to try to regain function?

    I was sent home 5 weeks after my accident. 2 weeks in the hospital and 3 in rehab. Nothing as far as rehab since then besides the little workouts I do for the last 2 years. A friend gave me a standing frame but its not the best. lol.

    Should I find a rehab facility and find out what that can possible give me? If so do you know a good facility in Oklahoma near Oklahoma City?

    I just don't know the direction to start moving in yet. lol.

    Thanks in advance and for the work you are doing!
    What would I do, if I were spinal-injured?

    First, I would get into a routine where I am standing at least an hour a day, six days a week. This can be in a standing frame, in a Glider 6000, or even in a swimming pool. If I can step, I would be using this hour to walk as well. Why? I believe that upright posture trains your cardiovascular system and bones to support your weight and the upright stance. If you don't use those functions, they will be lost. The upright posture will also improve your bladder function and stimulate bowel movement.

    Second, I would find a situation where I can do intensive walking training for 6 hours a day, 6 days a week, and for 6 weeks a year. I call this 666 training. The training should involve overground walking, swimming, and other means of increasing your cardiovascular tolerance and endurance. Of course, some people cannot stand or walk (due to contractures, hip dislocation, or flaccidity of lower limb muscles), substitute exercise should be devised.

    Third, I would get the best education that I can. There is strong evidence that quality of life after spinal cord injury correlates with education level, i.e. the higher the education level of the person, the better the quality of life after spinal cord injury. I joke with people that the about half of the brain is devoted to controlling and sensing the body below the neck. It is important to that part of the brain to good use.

    Fourth, I would earn as much money as I can. No matter what happens, being wealthy increases your choices and will increase your access to therapies.

    Wise.

  3. #23
    Wise, would you do that training if you were a "complete" injury 1 year post with no returns? I'm all about staying in shape but I was told the standing frame recent studies showed no improvement in bone density scans. Basically, the bones were the same reguardless of standing or not. I'm sure it improves posture, but to what degree? I did some lokomat training but had to pay out of pocket bc I'm labeled a complete injury. I have access to this equipment but am unsure if I'm doing my body any good by doing these things.. Thanks for your opinion.
    Donnie: Dr. Xiao, What are your thoughts on a cure/combination therapy for SCI's??
    CG Xiao: Donnie, I don't want to disappoint you, but I think it is impossible to restore the continuity of the cord or "bridge the gap" in the near future, let's say: 50 years. Dr Wise Young has been my most respected scientist in SCI. He has dedicated and contributed to SCI no other can match.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Donnie View Post
    Wise, would you do that training if you were a "complete" injury 1 year post with no returns? I'm all about staying in shape but I was told the standing frame recent studies showed no improvement in bone density scans. Basically, the bones were the same reguardless of standing or not. I'm sure it improves posture, but to what degree? I did some lokomat training but had to pay out of pocket bc I'm labeled a complete injury. I have access to this equipment but am unsure if I'm doing my body any good by doing these things.. Thanks for your opinion.
    It is true that several studies have suggested that standing an hour a day 3 days a week does not change the bone density over periods of 3 months. In my opinion, none of these studies followed the patients long enough and the patients did not stand enough. They also did not follow some of the other possible beneficial effects of standing.

    By the way, the standing an hour a day is not about staying in shape or even just about bone density. It is more about getting your body use to standing, toning up your cardiovascular system so that your sympathetic nervous system boosts vasoconstriction and increase heart rate to maintain your blood pressure when you stand. It takes the weight off your butt and puts it on your feet.

    Of course, it would be far better if you were doing more than standing. If you can take steps, move your legs, get your heart rate up and going... that would be better. By the way, our minimum requirement for people to join our clinical trials (SCINetUSA), which will measure walking outcome, is ability to to stand an hour a day. Why did we choose this requirement? If people cannot stand at least an hour a day, they have no business trying to join a clinical trial that will evaluate locomotor recovery as an outcome. Rather than waste time after treatment training people to stand after the therapy, this should be done beforehand.

    Wise.

  5. #25
    Senior Member lunasicc42's Avatar
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    Wise. I have a weird situation standing... When I was injured in 2002,I did some rehab in the hospital and could stand in a standing frame fine for like two hours, then we came home to tampa and could also stand fine at the physical therapy. Then we got one for home and the first time I got in it, I was fine. Then I went to step it up rehab and got really light headed. Came home and tried it again, got really light headed. Did it again like a week later and was fine again... I guess the jist of the question is.... Whats with the Fluctuations? Is that normal? Just a fluke I hope
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  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by lunasicc42 View Post
    Wise. I have a weird situation standing... When I was injured in 2002,I did some rehab in the hospital and could stand in a standing frame fine for like two hours, then we came home to tampa and could also stand fine at the physical therapy. Then we got one for home and the first time I got in it, I was fine. Then I went to step it up rehab and got really light headed. Came home and tried it again, got really light headed. Did it again like a week later and was fine again... I guess the jist of the question is.... Whats with the Fluctuations? Is that normal? Just a fluke I hope
    Not sure. You need to be doing it regularly. If I sat and laid down for a couple of days (even without spinal cord injury) and I then got up, I would become lightheaded. Wise.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    What would I do, if I were spinal-injured?

    First, I would get into a routine where I am standing at least an hour a day, six days a week. This can be in a standing frame, in a Glider 6000, or even in a swimming pool. If I can step, I would be using this hour to walk as well. Why? I believe that upright posture trains your cardiovascular system and bones to support your weight and the upright stance. If you don't use those functions, they will be lost. The upright posture will also improve your bladder function and stimulate bowel movement.

    Second, I would find a situation where I can do intensive walking training for 6 hours a day, 6 days a week, and for 6 weeks a year. I call this 666 training. The training should involve overground walking, swimming, and other means of increasing your cardiovascular tolerance and endurance. Of course, some people cannot stand or walk (due to contractures, hip dislocation, or flaccidity of lower limb muscles), substitute exercise should be devised.

    Third, I would get the best education that I can. There is strong evidence that quality of life after spinal cord injury correlates with education level, i.e. the higher the education level of the person, the better the quality of life after spinal cord injury. I joke with people that the about half of the brain is devoted to controlling and sensing the body below the neck. It is important to that part of the brain to good use.

    Fourth, I would earn as much money as I can. No matter what happens, being wealthy increases your choices and will increase your access to therapies.

    Wise.
    Wise, what is your opinion on FES bicycle use -1 hour sessions 3 times a week? I am C6 ASIA A, stand for 1 hour daily, do upper body resistance machines 3 times weekly, alternate daily FES on the Gastrocs and Anterior Tibials, daily Abdominal/Paraspinal FES, and have been using the FES bicycle for 10.5 years (2 times weekly for the first 6.5 years).

  8. #28
    FES bicycle and e-stim;

    thanks for the answers wise.

    what if an SCI stands with a walker - is in an upright position. then i believe it is the quads or the pelvic muscle, up and down inches a time (like thrusting) - hands stay firm on the walker so it is clearly muscles in the legs moving.

    what are your recommendations with FES, e-stim, and standing with the walker like aforementioned, thrusting

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by VJS View Post
    Wise, what is your opinion on FES bicycle use -1 hour sessions 3 times a week? I am C6 ASIA A, stand for 1 hour daily, do upper body resistance machines 3 times weekly, alternate daily FES on the Gastrocs and Anterior Tibials, daily Abdominal/Paraspinal FES, and have been using the FES bicycle for 10.5 years (2 times weekly for the first 6.5 years).
    VJS, sounds very sufficient. Wise.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by freedomdan View Post
    FES bicycle and e-stim;

    thanks for the answers wise.

    what if an SCI stands with a walker - is in an upright position. then i believe it is the quads or the pelvic muscle, up and down inches a time (like thrusting) - hands stay firm on the walker so it is clearly muscles in the legs moving.

    what are your recommendations with FES, e-stim, and standing with the walker like aforementioned, thrusting
    I don't really know. Wise.

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