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Thread: The new Quickie Hellium

  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI_OTR View Post
    Probably not that much. Their present "adjustable" design really doesn't add a significant amount of weight.
    You may well be correct that the weight savings is potentially only fractional, but for the user who does not need to make adjustments the absence of loose screws, bolts, etc. adds up to less maintenance and fewer repairs and parts replacement. It should also enhance the chair's long-term durability.

  2. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by stephen212 View Post
    You may well be correct that the weight savings is potentially only fractional, but for the user who does not need to make adjustments the absence of loose screws, bolts, etc. adds up to less maintenance and fewer repairs and parts replacement. It should also enhance the chair's long-term durability.
    Exactly, and that adjustments parts maybe can make some creaks turing with the chair, so if we don`t need adjustments it will be better for us a chair without them.

  3. #63

  4. #64

  5. #65

    minimum rear seat height too high?

    What do you think of the 16" minimum rear seat height (24" wheels)? I'm afraid that long torso/short arms people will be too high for effective pushing -particularly with thick cushions (e.g.: high profile/deep contour types). Your opinions?

    Thanks

    Antonio

  6. #66
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI_OTR View Post
    Very cheap, that chair is not avaible in Spain yet, is coming in Octuber with a price around $4000.

    They are waiting because the month of Octuber are going to be noverties here, this Quickie Q7( Helium in Europe), Kurschall KSL and a new Panthera who they tell is going to be a new world weight record, the frame of the Panthera is made of chrome-molybdenum.

    Do you know what is the thick of your ZRc tubes walls?

  7. #67
    Quote Originally Posted by Antonio View Post
    What do you think of the 16" minimum rear seat height (24" wheels)? I'm afraid that long torso/short arms people will be too high for effective pushing -particularly with thick cushions (e.g.: high profile/deep contour types). Your opinions?

    Thanks

    Antonio
    Good observation. The Q7 parts manual popped up online this morning, and the reason for the limited rear STF height appears to be due to the design of what Quickie calls the rear "axle plate" (a) in the parts manual. I think their engineers refer to it more-appropriately as the "axle stem". On the Q7, there are three height adjustment holes in the camber tube clamp (b). By its very design, the minimal length of "a" will be dictated by the length of "b". The axle stem is available in different lengths, and the part selected when the chair is produced is based upon the rear STF height spec provided. I have yet to see a Q7 up close, but use of a set screw to secure the clamp also concerns me.

    The design used on the GT and GTi strikes me as a more versatile, elegant, and lighter design. I think the main complaint they tried to address with the Q7's design was the protrusion of excess bracket below the camber tube with lower STF height settings (nothing that a hack saw and file couldn't solve with the GT/GTi's bracket).

    However, as your post implies, a minimum rear STF height of 16" with 24" wheels could be a show stopper for many potential end users of the Q7 .

    stephen212's post from yesterday about a future fixed rear seat height version (#57) may provide some insight into Quickie's plan to address this. Quickie's manufacturing process is geared more for higher volumes and lower costs than TiLite or Top End, so the possibility they might produce a custom individually CAD designed fixed STF height model didn't make sense to me. Until now.

    How do you go lower? You take out the top two adjustment holes in the camber tube clamp. Without the extra holes, a shorter axle stem becomes possible, and a lower rear STF height can be offered.

    Unfortunately, this approach may not provide the benefit that stephen and totoL1 mentioned in their replies to my quip in post #59. Time will tell if I am correct in my speculation. If I am, however, there will still be the same maintenance requirements (but maybe they will be able to eliminate those pesky splines).
    Last edited by SCI_OTR; 09-20-2009 at 12:15 PM.

  8. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by stephen212 View Post
    The Marvel Wheelchair dudes' take on titanium and vibration dampening:
    Titanium enjoyed a brief moment in the sun in the bike world, with manufacturers touting the same advantages that the wheelchair builders are currently, light and strong, dampens vibration, doesn’t need to be painted, and vaguely described ‘ride characteristics’.

    The truth is, comparing apples to apples, a length of titanium tube is heavier than the same length of aluminum tube. Again, as mentioned earlier, unless you butt the tubing, the material is just not being used in the right way.

    The vibratory dampening characteristics of titanium have been used to promote the material, as was also the case in the bike industry, the reality though is that real vibration in a frame only happens at relatively high speeds, in excess of 25 km/h. What does happen at lower speeds is bumps, there is a slight acoustic vibration that results from bumps, but the real way to deal with the issue is through shock absorption, not vibratory dampening.
    Yeah, I read that too when we started mentioning Marvel over a year ago. Sounds like two young rebellious upstarts taking on "the establishment"--particularly TiLite (not that that's a bad thing).

    Titanium will provide a smoother ride than aluminum on surfaces like tile, asphalt, and normal sidewalk. Suspension will trump titanium, but at the expense of weight. It's all about finding the optimal balance of trade off's for one's particular circumstances.

  9. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by stephen212 View Post
    Met a guy this morning -- a para who works at a rehab facility outside of New York City -- who got to try demo a Q7... He also said that he was told that Quickie is going to offer a fixed-frame version of the Q7 in the not too distant future.
    I have to admit, Stephen212 provided accurate intelligence about a future version of the Q7.

    I must admit, I didn't think Sunrise would see any benefit in offering a fixed STF height version. After all, if it's not spec'd out correctly, there's no way to fix it, and we all know how well a lot of therapists and DME's are at spec'ing out wheelchairs.

    Well, I've also heard about plans for a fixed STF model similar to the Crossfire, Razorblade, and ZR. From what I've heard, it will be at least 3 lbs. lighter than the standard Q7.

  10. #70
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI_OTR View Post

    Well, I've also heard about plans for a fixed STF model similar to the Crossfire, Razorblade, and ZR. From what I've heard, it will be at least 3 lbs. lighter than the standard Q7.
    Do you know where is going to be avaible a fixed STF? because i think that chair will be interesting.

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