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Thread: Can I handle a dog?

  1. #1

    Can I handle a dog?

    I love dogs but have never had one. Grew up with two cats.

    Anyways, this is all theoretical in the meantime but I want to know how much responsibility it entails. I know it's a lot.

    Some q's:

    How would I pick up the poop?
    How often do I have to take it out?
    I'm going to be living in an 11th floor apartment (with a porch). Is that ok?
    Should I wait till I get a house with a yard (if that ever happens)?
    Is there anything else I should know?

    Thx in advance! Lots of love

  2. #2
    what size dog to you want Mimi? A little dog can be trained to use a litter box.
    My blog: Living Life at Butt Level

    Ignite Phoenix #9 - Wheelchairs and Wisdom: Living Life at Butt Level

    "I will not die an unlived life. I will not live in fear of falling or catching fire. I choose to inhabit my days, to allow my living to open me, to make me less afraid, more accessible, to loosen my heart until it becomes a wing, a torch, a promise. I choose to risk my significance; to live so that which comes to me as seed goes to the next as blossom and that which comes to me as blossom, goes on as fruit."

    Dawna Markova Author of Open Mind.

  3. #3

    Question Well yes

    Questions to ponder:

    A. will the dog be happy
    B. can you afford Vet bills
    C. who takes care of the dog if you get sidelined
    D. can you feed the dog
    E. who takes doggie for walks/poop

    I run a non-profit dog rescue/placement 501. There is a lot of responsibility of owning a dog. We have 4. But I live in the mtns. on 40 acres. Just think about it. I love my doggies. Their great.
    Lynarrd Skynyrd Lives

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by JenJen View Post
    what size dog to you want Mimi? A little dog can be trained to use a litter box.
    Medium, I guess. I'm not sure.

    Quote Originally Posted by FreeBird View Post
    Questions to ponder:

    A. will the dog be happy
    B. can you afford Vet bills
    C. who takes care of the dog if you get sidelined
    D. can you feed the dog
    E. who takes doggie for walks/poop

    I run a non-profit dog rescue/placement 501. There is a lot of responsibility of owning a dog. We have 4. But I live in the mtns. on 40 acres. Just think about it. I love my doggies. Their great.
    Wow, good questions.
    A. I think I could make a dog happy
    B. I assume I can afford it. Would have to redo my budget.
    C. I have caregivers 24/7 so hopefully they would take over.
    D. Physically? Probably not, but I eould make sure it would always have food and water available.
    E. I'd like to walk it. Don't know how I'd scoop the poop though.

    40 acres. Wow!

  5. #5
    I live in a house with a yard and a doggy door so it is easier for me. Even though I still have to have help because I got a German Shepard from the shelter. I was raised as a child with a chiwawa, how ever you spell it, and they made great house and lap dogs and they are very potective and can be fun. You wouldn't have to take it out to poop. Teach it to do it on paper.
    Mary
    I want to Rock you Gypsy soul and together we will flow into the Mystic.
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  6. #6
    In my first class/team training a man came over from Jeruselum to get his CCI dog.
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  7. #7
    I remember someone with a SD who developed a harness-like thing that caught poop in a bag. I vaguely remember people with visual disabilities in my owner trained service dog group being over the moon about it. Might be worth looking into...
    My blog: Living Life at Butt Level

    Ignite Phoenix #9 - Wheelchairs and Wisdom: Living Life at Butt Level

    "I will not die an unlived life. I will not live in fear of falling or catching fire. I choose to inhabit my days, to allow my living to open me, to make me less afraid, more accessible, to loosen my heart until it becomes a wing, a torch, a promise. I choose to risk my significance; to live so that which comes to me as seed goes to the next as blossom and that which comes to me as blossom, goes on as fruit."

    Dawna Markova Author of Open Mind.

  8. #8
    Member brokeneck's Avatar
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    I have a black lab that I had before my injury and he is a pleasure to have in my home.I do have 24/7 nursing and they help a lot.He has just undergone a BAD time because of a tick bite(Lyme Disease)Many trips to the vet and antibiotics.Very costly,but well worth it.He acts like his old self now,loads of fun.

  9. #9
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    -Mimi,freebird bought up some very worthwhile points.Think about these first of all.

    -Jen mentioned the litterbox for a small dog.Same goes for puppy pads.

    -Do your research first.The last thing you want is a dog that doesn't meet your lifestyle requirements.Keep in mind,the bigger the dog,the more to feed.Plus,certain breeds are more prone to health problems than others.Certainly,there's no exception that the other's will be either.You don't need an overly active, hyper or overpowering dog.Also take into consideration if you or your caregivers have allergies as well.I reccomend going to the shelter (of course) and visiting with all of the dogs a few times until you find a fit.There are good points to a puppy if you have someone to help you train them.I reccomend one around 2 that's been spayed/neutered,this just helps to calm them down(well most)plus you won't have to be bothered w/ periods(in heat) and possibly male hiking/marking territory.Take into consideration you'll need help getting them house-trained @ first.

    -I keep a leash hooked on my indoor dog,this way I can grab it and hook it to my chair.The chair may freak them out but they get use to it.When you visit your potential pet,try it out w/ them.

    -I don't know how your balance is,but possibly a pooper-scooper w/ a u-cuff attached maybe?Even if you didn't lean forward,maybe you could manage from the side?Look online and play w/ the petstore ones,see if you can come up w/ a solution so you could hold onto it.

    -The smaller the dog,they usually need to go out more often.A puppy will too until it learns to control it's systems.

    -Feeding/watering..I grab a cup w/ a handle,fill it up and pour from the side as I'm steadier that way.Drop a few pieces-ahh,they'll get it.

    Lastly,a pet is so worth the responsibility to me.A pet just might bring you the joy and company you've been longing.I hope you find a fit Mimi,just don't rush your decision.If a dog seems to be too overwhelming,is a cat an option?They're just as rewarding and more physically manageable.

  10. #10
    Keep in mind,the bigger the dog,the more to feed.
    And on the other end of things, the bigger the dog, the bigger the poop (both in size and quantity).
    It is easier to find men who will volunteer to die, than to find those who are willing to endure pain with patience.

    ~Julius Caesar


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