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Thread: musical instruments for quads

  1. #1

    Cool musical instruments for quads

    what r some instruments a quad can use...
    lets let creative here.......
    i`m learning harmonica now
    and i band i like uses a washboard ....
    any comment will help
    thanks
    woody

  2. #2
    glockenspiel but you gotta use some type of hand cuff for the mallets.

  3. #3
    Moderator jody's Avatar
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    anyone remember the lady who plays keybord and sings at the same time using her toungue?

    do you have any hand streingth at all?

  4. #4
    Moderator jody's Avatar
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    if you can do some washboard, you can also do dulcimer, autoharp(recomended), but a pain to tune and maintain, Hammer dulcimer, maybe hurdygurdy, they are expensive, but have seen them on ebay. I think a four string dulcimer would be great to start with. the chords are fretted with a stick, and it takes little work to make a nice sound. You can get a nice little starter dulcimer at toys R us, or walmart the first act brand. I have one, it has a solid ceder top and is nicely made.

  5. #5
    I do a mean beat box.

    and with music programs I can play any instrument I want.

  6. #6

    re: musical instruments for quads

    hi cc, i've been lurking, have enjoyed reading the other ideas, thought i'd jump in, this is my first post.
    i had a c5 incomplete injury 39 years ago as a teenager.

    my first recommendation of an ideal post-sci instrument is to use your voice, sing, and deliberately practice singing every day. it will expand your breath capacity, make you healthier and lift your spirits. if you have a high level injury and can't sing, hum. take some singing lessons and learn about the mechanics, anatomy and physiology of singing, you'll learn how to visualize and control inner muscles and structures you can't see or feel. this helps raise awareness of subtle nervous system functions and how to improve control of them. in my experience these
    techniques carried over and helped me with non-voice related nervous system control. learning visualization techniques is a very powerful tool
    for people with sci.

    ok, my next musical instrument recommendation is the harp--
    after my injury i was an angry, depressed teen, i rebelled against the usual ot hand exercises, found them frustrating and boring. i was esp. depressed by not being able to play piano. by chance i saw a marx bros film where harpo played a one-note melody on a harp with only his right index finger, (coincidentally my rt. index was the only finger i could reliably control at that point.) i had an 'a-ha' moment and found a local teacher who rented me a small irish harp and helped me adapt but still shoot for correct hand/finger positions of harp technique. i've been happily playing the harp for the past 38 years, in spite of my quad hands. my hand function has improved every year since i started the harp and i've advanced to the point of using 8 fingers ( harpists don't use the pinky fingers to play.) i have limits still, but play well enough that i've even been hired to play for weddings, parties and no one realized i had limitations. i arrange my
    music to fit what my hands can do. turns out that there have been lots of hand-disabled musicians who do this....django reinhardt, for example.
    i think the harp is a nearly perfect instrument for sci and incomplete hand function rehab. you can sit behind the harp, don't have to hold it, or can affix a small harp to a table at the most ergonomic height, can rest your elbows on either side, if needed. the vertical strings allow you to freely access notes from the right and left sides, you can 'extend' your fingers by dropping the wrist to land a finger on the string. playing a single note gives lots of instant feedback about how much finger strength you've expended to pull the string, and the sound of the harp is so beautiful that playing a simple melody plucked one note/one finger at a time is very rewarding and motivating.
    i started playing 8 months after my injury, using only my right index finger to play a string, but i quickly became smitten with the harp, spent hours of enjoyable time attempting to do more and add/strengthen more fingers.
    as we discover, this is key to any lifelong therapy, finding what you love to do.
    the drawbacks of the harp are 1. obtaining one. 2. finding a way to keep it tuned. There are ways to do these things if you're determined.
    My final recommendation for a therapeutic post-sci instrument would be to try a lap zither (like this one: http://www.amazon.com/MELODY-HARP-by...ref=pd_cp_MI_2 ) they're small and light, can be positioned at a good angle for various abilities,
    they hold their tuning longer and you can slide printed music under the strings to 'follow-the dots' and instantly play lots of tunes.
    sorry this is so long, will try to be more concise in future.

  7. #7
    Moderator jody's Avatar
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    cant forget ukulele. love em.

  8. #8
    Nice first post Crashbang. Welcome to CC. Don't be shy

    Quote Originally Posted by Crashbang View Post
    hi cc, i've been lurking, have enjoyed reading the other ideas, thought i'd jump in, this is my first post.
    i had a c5 incomplete injury 39 years ago as a teenager.

    my first recommendation of an ideal post-sci instrument is to use your voice, sing, and deliberately practice singing every day. it will expand your breath capacity, make you healthier and lift your spirits. if you have a high level injury and can't sing, hum. take some singing lessons and learn about the mechanics, anatomy and physiology of singing, you'll learn how to visualize and control inner muscles and structures you can't see or feel. this helps raise awareness of subtle nervous system functions and how to improve control of them. in my experience these
    techniques carried over and helped me with non-voice related nervous system control. learning visualization techniques is a very powerful tool
    for people with sci.

    ok, my next musical instrument recommendation is the harp--
    after my injury i was an angry, depressed teen, i rebelled against the usual ot hand exercises, found them frustrating and boring. i was esp. depressed by not being able to play piano. by chance i saw a marx bros film where harpo played a one-note melody on a harp with only his right index finger, (coincidentally my rt. index was the only finger i could reliably control at that point.) i had an 'a-ha' moment and found a local teacher who rented me a small irish harp and helped me adapt but still shoot for correct hand/finger positions of harp technique. i've been happily playing the harp for the past 38 years, in spite of my quad hands. my hand function has improved every year since i started the harp and i've advanced to the point of using 8 fingers ( harpists don't use the pinky fingers to play.) i have limits still, but play well enough that i've even been hired to play for weddings, parties and no one realized i had limitations. i arrange my
    music to fit what my hands can do. turns out that there have been lots of hand-disabled musicians who do this....django reinhardt, for example.
    i think the harp is a nearly perfect instrument for sci and incomplete hand function rehab. you can sit behind the harp, don't have to hold it, or can affix a small harp to a table at the most ergonomic height, can rest your elbows on either side, if needed. the vertical strings allow you to freely access notes from the right and left sides, you can 'extend' your fingers by dropping the wrist to land a finger on the string. playing a single note gives lots of instant feedback about how much finger strength you've expended to pull the string, and the sound of the harp is so beautiful that playing a simple melody plucked one note/one finger at a time is very rewarding and motivating.
    i started playing 8 months after my injury, using only my right index finger to play a string, but i quickly became smitten with the harp, spent hours of enjoyable time attempting to do more and add/strengthen more fingers.
    as we discover, this is key to any lifelong therapy, finding what you love to do.
    the drawbacks of the harp are 1. obtaining one. 2. finding a way to keep it tuned. There are ways to do these things if you're determined.
    My final recommendation for a therapeutic post-sci instrument would be to try a lap zither (like this one: http://www.amazon.com/MELODY-HARP-by...ref=pd_cp_MI_2 ) they're small and light, can be positioned at a good angle for various abilities,
    they hold their tuning longer and you can slide printed music under the strings to 'follow-the dots' and instantly play lots of tunes.
    sorry this is so long, will try to be more concise in future.
    My blog: Living Life at Butt Level

    Ignite Phoenix #9 - Wheelchairs and Wisdom: Living Life at Butt Level

    "I will not die an unlived life. I will not live in fear of falling or catching fire. I choose to inhabit my days, to allow my living to open me, to make me less afraid, more accessible, to loosen my heart until it becomes a wing, a torch, a promise. I choose to risk my significance; to live so that which comes to me as seed goes to the next as blossom and that which comes to me as blossom, goes on as fruit."

    Dawna Markova Author of Open Mind.

  9. #9
    therem....
    "With my lightnin' bolts a glowin'
    I can see where I am goin' to be
    when the reaper he reaches and touches my hand."

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