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Thread: Walking/Running Quads?

  1. #1

    Walking/Running Quads?

    Is anyone seeing improvements continuing years out like real improvements? Going from labored walk to semi normal gait or better balance or perhaps running

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Barely getting there, I can't stand it. Walking, and all I want to do is run. I'm hoping that with the pool getting warmer I can meet my goals. I'm still walking on the deck of a lobster boat in the ocean, it helps, I haven't crashed in a while, but I've got to pick up the pace. With all the new therapys coming up %10 would be alot for me.

  3. #3

    Ride Bike

    I actually found that riding bike has allowed me to walk much stronger and more. It actually took about 1yr of constant riding a little every day on a stationary bike then to a regular bike in a trainer now to up to 30 miles on an actual road bike approx 3 times a week. Maybe you could try it I hope it helps you also.
    Craig







    Quote Originally Posted by alhavel View Post
    Barely getting there, I can't stand it. Walking, and all I want to do is run. I'm hoping that with the pool getting warmer I can meet my goals. I'm still walking on the deck of a lobster boat in the ocean, it helps, I haven't crashed in a while, but I've got to pick up the pace. With all the new therapys coming up %10 would be alot for me.

  4. #4
    It's slow and amazing but I excercise unorthox style My own Techniques Daily and see small improvments .
    I bought a used walker and used crutches years back and these things come in handy on my Good Day's lol
    I dont like sitting long periods of time and i've always been athletic all my life my fingers are usually curled from my SCI level making it good for my hand rails on my quikie lightweight wheelchair
    Currently I am looking into afrording a used fanwheel Flywheel resistance excercise bike
    being my old excercise bike is a steel wheel strap resistance style one but I do use it sometimes When I am up to it Depending on my level of pain that day lol
    My level of chronic pain changes from day to day But I never give up on workouts


    My excercise regimine is lots of protein 2 Hard Boiled eggs ok and 4 0z prune juice then go to my hydro gymn setup in my BF's shop and I do leg flexercises First

    Then arm butterflies 15 at a ime regimens and then after 100 some situpss for my abs while I am laying flat on my back on the arm shoulder hydrogymn work bench My workout equiptment is hydraulic and old but it works for me .
    Better to have pain and Gain than to have No pain and No gain
    Determination only makes oneself stronger physically and mentally
    Never Say Never
    Sincerely
    Gypsylady

  5. #5
    Senior Member Katilea's Avatar
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    Ok I'm confused, surely if you can get back to walking without aids and running you would no longer be classed as 'Quadriplegic'!

    I'm in UK and although I can pull myself to standing and manage a few steps I do have some jerky movements in my hands and loss of fine motor function in fingers. As I can still push myself round bungalow in manual chair and outdoors with nuDrive levers on chair I can't get an electric chair provided by the NHS as I am not yet classed as Quadriplegic as I have enough movement in arms to dress and feed myself and live independently and self propel.

    Even though I live in a village full of hills and cant actually get past end of my own drive in manual chair on my own I still cant get one. I have had to find the money to buy scooter and electric chair myself to get around village with dog or get in taxi to town (shopping precinct is on big hill too)

    I dont get how you can still be defined as Quad and be able to run? Is there a different diagnosis system over in US to here?

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Katilea View Post
    Ok I'm confused, surely if you can get back to walking without aids and running you would no longer be classed as 'Quadriplegic'!

    [...]

    I dont get how you can still be defined as Quad and be able to run? Is there a different diagnosis system over in US to here?
    I thought it was odd too, but basically if you have a cervical injury, then you are a 'quad'. I found this out in rehab. This thread may be of interest -

    http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthread.php?t=37276

    btw There is a guy over here who has a C6 incomplete injury, in a wheelchair, but his arms work well, and most folks would think he is a para, but he is actually an incomplete quad. He climbed El Capitan in Yosemite National Park last year, maybe the first quad to do so (paras have done it).

    My injury is very incomplete - the muscles on my left side are weakened, and I have sensory deficits on my right (below a certain level). They call this incomplete paralysis, but there is enough strength & balance left that I can do things like hiking, cycling and rock climbing without adaptive equipment. Most people would never suspect that I have an SCI unless they looked carefully or I told them.

  7. #7

    What I've learned

    Katilea, I think the terms "quadriplegia" and 'paraplegia' refer to
    whether the injury affects four limbs or two. There are other classifications, hemiplegia and tetraplegia.
    The classification by itself doesn't indicate the extent of the remaining function, only which limbs are affected.

    Incoquad, I'm 39 years post-injury, c5 incomplete.
    I was a 'walking quad' able to walk with a spastic gait within one year of my accident, after daily PT and home exercise.
    I never did gain sufficient balance, stability or ease of movement to be able to run or even walk very fast.
    Walking took a lot of energy and concentration, it wasn't a natural effort the way it is pre-injury.
    I was fourteen when I had my water-skiing accident. As years went by,
    I was able to gain more strength,
    endurance and a smoother gait by taking tai chi, ballet barre, and pilates-style classes geared to
    older people, also swimming and doing water exercise.
    Tai chi and ballet barre classes were especially helpful because
    in those disciplines you strive to perform movements in a
    very specific way. Even when I couldn't achieve the ideal form, it was useful and motivating to have an ideal form to work toward, and the teachers were willing and knowledgeable
    about how to modify exercises so that I would see improvement and not injure myself.
    I think that learning some of the slow form martial arts would be well worth your time; another benefit in martial arts class is that
    some are taught on heavily padded floors, so falling isn't a big risk.
    Ballet barre gives you a bar to hold onto and you work first one side, then the other.
    My other major improvements came from stretching class, also taught
    by trained dancers. Keeping my weight just slightly below normal helped, too.
    I was able to walk with no aids or only a cane for about 26 years, but
    after two pregnancies & some weight gain, keeping up with small children, a whiplash injury in a car accident, and the aging process I've lost considerable function and endurance; I started falling more often, broke toes, tore the miniscus of my right knee and following advice of orthopedic surgeon, didn't have it surgically repaired.
    Now my knee is too unstable to risk any walking and falling, except walking in a pool.
    After walking all those years with out-of-true alignment (because my left side was more affected than right) I developed a lot of osteoarthritis in my joints from the hips down and my feet also have multiple problems
    from the wear and tear of the spastic gait walking. I'm not willing to undergo elective surgery to fix because I know I'd lose more function from staying immobile during recovery.
    I've been using a manual chair or a scooter since 1996 and I have to say it was tough making the transition from walking. If I could go back in time and use what I've learned all these years, I wouldn't have pushed
    myself when tired or in pain to always walk or to attempt long distances. I would also listen more to my body and pay more attention to signs of fatigue.
    Although I went for maintenance PT reviews every couple of years, I wish I'd been more diligent about taking care of my conditioning after I had kids, but I was usually too exhausted to think about it ; )
    From my personal (but nonscientifically based) experience, I would encourage CCC members, walking or not, to look for ways to complement your PT with activities that teach you a particular technique, like yoga, pilates, tai chi, slow martial arts, hula, stretch classes and water exercise. I really believe that if you have the potential to gain more function, you will get more back if you work at achieving very specific smaller goals
    that ultimately allow you to achieve a competent technique. In ballet, you learn not just to extend your leg, for example, but to extend it in a certain way, starting slowly and building strength and ability over time.
    These techniques teach you how to think about your muscles and nerves from the inside out, you learn to use mental imagery to guide your function. When you watch your teacher demonstrate a certain movement, it engages the 'mirroring' part of your brain, and I think that make it easier, too, plus the repetition of movements and the structure of the classes gives your brain repeated opportunities to attempt a specific movement.
    Also dance and martial arts studios usually have mirrored walls, which helps you check your body position and watch yourself so you can correct your movements. Currently there are some excellent DVDs for chair yoga, stretching, dancing and exercise, too. Make sure your teachers are highly trained and understand the effects of sci on your function and watch out for the 'no pain, no gain' mentality...If you overwork or injure your muscles trying to achieve too much, too soon, then you must wait longer to go back to making progress. Moderation is the most efficient way to progress, I think.
    Don't do anything that causes pain. Find something you'll enjoy doing so you'll stick to it. Good luck!
    PS Even watching DVDs of dance, yoga, exercise classes might help you
    to engage that 'mirroring' part of the brain I mentioned. When I was in the hospital for the weeks after my accident, I got a lot of mental relief from intensely watching sports on TV and trying to project myself into the mindset of the athletes...this was vicarious experience of physical activity, but I really believe it helped me in some way, and esp. with overcoming
    the initial claustrophobia of being paralyzed.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Crashbang View Post
    I think the terms "quadriplegia" and 'paraplegia' refer to whether the injury affects four limbs or two. There are other classifications, hemiplegia and tetraplegia.
    The classification by itself doesn't indicate the extent of the remaining function, only which limbs are affected.
    Tetraplegia and quadriplegia refer to the same thing -- the difference is that tetraplegia is the more modern medical term, and quadriplegia is being slowly phased out.

    I have only read about the term 'hemiplegia' on the web .. whether it's in current medical use I don't know. My doctor in rehab said I had tetraplegia.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Katilea's Avatar
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    Ok, the only people I had heard referred to as 'quadriplegic' before were people like Christopher Reeve, Stephen Hawking, or kids born with severe CP who couldn't control their movements enough to use either their arms or legs (usually athetoid CP). So I thought it related to the DEGREE of disability as well as whether whatever condition you had, been in both your arms AND legs.

    I have a progressive neurological disorder so muscle fatigue is a big part of things too, I cant do the stuff you have mentioned yet no doctor over here has ever told me that I was considered 'quadriplegic', so I assumed it was a term only used for the most severely disabled unable to use their arms/hands to do anything useful in daily life like dressing, feeding, typing etc.

    I have seen 'Murderball' DVD and they were also referred to as Quads but they were still in wheelchairs and their difficulties with thier hands were still quite obvious.

    If I saw some one climbing, hiking, cycling like anyone else would (not using wheelchairs/special bike etc) I wouldn't have considered them to still be 'quadriplegic' if they could do that, surely they would have been considered to have made a full recovery from their injury? as in what way are they still as disabled as someone who cant move or control their movements. I dont understand why someone then much more able would be classified with the same term as someone severely disabled and needing full time care?

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Katilea View Post
    Ok, the only people I had heard referred to as 'quadriplegic' before were people like Christopher Reeve, Stephen Hawking, or kids born with severe CP who couldn't control their movements enough to use either their arms or legs (usually athetoid CP). So I thought it related to the DEGREE of disability as well as whether whatever condition you had, been in both your arms AND legs.

    I have a progressive neurological disorder so muscle fatigue is a big part of things too, I cant do the stuff you have mentioned yet no doctor over here has ever told me that I was considered 'quadriplegic', so I assumed it was a term only used for the most severely disabled unable to use their arms/hands to do anything useful in daily life like dressing, feeding, typing etc.

    I have seen 'Murderball' DVD and they were also referred to as Quads but they were still in wheelchairs and their difficulties with thier hands were still quite obvious.

    If I saw some one climbing, hiking, cycling like anyone else would (not using wheelchairs/special bike etc) I wouldn't have considered them to still be 'quadriplegic' if they could do that, surely they would have been considered to have made a full recovery from their injury? as in what way are they still as disabled as someone who cant move or control their movements. I dont understand why someone then much more able would be classified with the same term as someone severely disabled and needing full time care?
    Read up on the ASIA scale -- there is info on google and also this website.

    A lot of people would think I have experienced 'full recovery', but that isn't the case. However, I don't use disabled parking spaces, and I am able to work for a living, so I don't need disability assistance from the government. In that sense I am not disabled.

    It sounds to me as though the word 'quadriplegic' is used in different contexts. For the purposes of quad rugby, I probably wouldn't qualify. For the purposes of your national health care system, I am not a quad. Most people would probably not consider me a quad either.

    Medically speaking, however -- in the strictest sense -- I have an injury to my cervical spinal cord. That means I have tetraplegia, mild as it is (ASIA D). As you probably know, spinal cord injury can be complete, incomplete, and very incomplete. This is the purpose of the ASIA scale.

    This website is about spinal cord injury. You don't have to tell me that my injury is not as severe as Christopher Reeve's -- I know very well, because I was in rehab too, and met people with complete spinal cord injuries. My roommate was an ASIA A para, and every morning at 4am the nurses would come in to help him with his catheters and bowel program. I rehabbed alongside people who were using tenodesis braces, and one guy with a mouth stick on his powerchair. I've attended the support group meetings with guys who have been quads in powerchairs for many years.

    Cheers, hope this helps

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