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Thread: Rear wheel height?

  1. #1

    Rear wheel height?

    Hopefully this makes sense...

    How high do your rear wheels come up above your seat cushion? In several threads here, pictures of folks sitting in their chairs shows their rear wheels coming up several inches above the seat cushion, so that the top of the rear wheels are parallel with the users' waist. (See this pic from wft's recent posting: http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/attachm...7&d=1243826708

    With the the rear wheels at that height, is pushing efficiency improved? In my current chair (Aero-Z, with 24" Spinergies/Shox), the tops of the rear wheels barely come above my seat cushion -- the PT which assisted in spec'ing the chair recommended such a low configuration to minimize possible long-term shoulder issues. I recently started a new job where I am doing a lot more pushing, and so I'm wondering if having the rear wheels come up higher above my cushion would increase pushing efficiency.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    I don't know anything about how you transfer, or what difficulty you have doing transfers, but remember if the wheel comes up that high you are going to have to use your shoulder's to lift over it. That might have been what your PT meant. I could never lift that high, so without lower wheels I would be stuck.

  3. #3
    Hi Eileen,

    Transfers are luckily very easy for me (I have cerebral palsy, not SCI) and I am usually able to transfer without having to go up and over the rear wheels. I have pretty good shoulder strength. I think that the PT meant by having lower wheels, the angle(s) that one's shoulders maintain while pushing mean that a person would be less likely to develop shoulder issues as a result of a lifetime of pushing.

    Still, we seem to be a minority on CC in regards to lower real wheels, so I'm just curious as to the benefits of a higher wheel.

    G

  4. #4
    Although everyone is different, a general rule is that the tips of your middle fingers should touch the hubs of your wheels. Fore/aft location of the axle is also important.

  5. #5
    your pt is a fucking idiot, be sure and let them know that. thats totally opposite.



    Quote Originally Posted by Garrett View Post
    Hopefully this makes sense...

    How high do your rear wheels come up above your seat cushion? In several threads here, pictures of folks sitting in their chairs shows their rear wheels coming up several inches above the seat cushion, so that the top of the rear wheels are parallel with the users' waist. (See this pic from wft's recent posting: http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/attachm...7&d=1243826708

    With the the rear wheels at that height, is pushing efficiency improved? In my current chair (Aero-Z, with 24" Spinergies/Shox), the tops of the rear wheels barely come above my seat cushion -- the PT which assisted in spec'ing the chair recommended such a low configuration to minimize possible long-term shoulder issues. I recently started a new job where I am doing a lot more pushing, and so I'm wondering if having the rear wheels come up higher above my cushion would increase pushing efficiency.

    Thanks!
    Bike-on.com rep
    John@bike-on.com
    c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
    sponsored handcycle racer

  6. #6
    Most wheelchair users I know, as well as myself, transfer in and out at an angle in front of the rear wheel, so lowering the back of the seat to get a longer and better wheelchair stroke is not a problem. With the back of the seat a good bit lower than the front, it takes a harder push to get out.

    I have used a chair with 26" rear wheels, and they also give you a better stroke and make wheeling easier. The downside is that there is less room in front of the wheel at the seat level, so transferring can be a good bit more difficult if you are a marginal transferer. Also, not all chairs will work with 26" wheels.

    Another alternative you can consider is power assist with e-Motions add-ons or a dedicated power assist chair, such as the Tailwind.
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

  7. #7
    Thanks SCI_OTR,

    At my current setting, my fingers to come just to the center of the hubs. Sometimes though, I still feel perched on my chair, so I didn't know if raising the rear wheels so they came up higher above my cushion might help with some stability, as well as a different, perhaps easier, pushing dynamic.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by fuentejps View Post
    your pt is a fucking idiot, be sure and let them know that. thats totally opposite.
    LOL. Sad, but true. I suspected that wasn't right. To be honest, at the level where my wheels currently are, pushing is not necessarily difficult, I just wanted to check in here for thoughts, as I'm currently looking for ways to make pushing easier, since I'm doing more if it these days.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI_OTR View Post
    Although everyone is different, a general rule is that the tips of your middle fingers should touch the hubs of your wheels. Fore/aft location of the axle is also important.
    I find this thread timely and SCI_OTR's post very interesting. As one looking to purchase a new chair, one of my desires is to get lower into the rear wheels for better "stroke" when pushing and I had never heard the scenario before that SCI gives. I just checked and I am guessing that the tips of my fingers are about 3 inches shy of center.

    I sit rather tall so I have been struggling with what front and rear heights I want to go with on my new chair, struggling between too much dump and keeping my feet off the ground.

  10. #10
    for best stroke u need to be in the chair not on it.

    if u have good feeling w/ no pressure issues remove cushion or go to a thin one. that will drop u in a bit.

    maybe 1 % of pt/ots know what the hell they r talking about, the rest r idiots.
    Bike-on.com rep
    John@bike-on.com
    c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
    sponsored handcycle racer

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