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Thread: CANADA - Senate passes 'historic' bill on reproductive technology

  1. #1

    CANADA - Senate passes 'historic' bill on reproductive technology

    Not sure if this article was posted here over the weekend. Did some surfing through different forums, could not see it.


    By KIM LUNMAN
    Friday, March 12, 2004 - Page A7

    "OTTAWA -- The Senate passed a controversial bill on reproductive technology yesterday, paving the way for a long-awaited law to allow stem-cell research on human embryos and ban human cloning in Canada after a decade of debate..."

    source

    [This message was edited by lel42 on 03-15-04 at 12:33 PM.]

  2. #2
    Senior Member poonsuzanne's Avatar
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    lel42,

    Thanks for posting! Unfortunately, I cannot open the link.

    Suzanne

  3. #3
    Originally posted by Suzanne Poon:

    lel42,

    Thanks for posting! Unfortunately, I cannot open the link.

    Suzanne
    <http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servl...tional/Canada>

    [This message was edited by lel42 on 03-15-04 at 12:49 PM.]

  4. #4
    ok...here is the whole text cut and paste. I don't know why the link itself can not be open.

    "Senate passes 'historic' bill on reproductive technology


    By KIM LUNMAN
    Friday, March 12, 2004 - Page A7

    OTTAWA -- The Senate passed a controversial bill on reproductive technology yesterday, paving the way for a long-awaited law to allow stem-cell research on human embryos and ban human cloning in Canada after a decade of debate.

    "It's historic. We have a very balanced legislation. It's a compassionate bill," said Liberal Senator Yves Morin, a physician who supported the bill.

    "Make no mistake," Liberal Senator Jim Munson told the Senate. "Bill C-6 will not unleash mad scientists and lead to unethical genetic experiments. . . . It respects the values of Canadians by banning human cloning, sex selection, commercial surrogate motherhood contracts and the sale of sperm and eggs."

    Health Minister Pierre Pettigrew has said the legislation is a top priority of the Liberal government.

    But the bill continued to draw fire from critics yesterday who say its strict regulations and restrictions on the fertility treatment industry will hurt infertile couples. The ban on payments to egg and sperm donors will lead to a shortage in donors, they say.

    "There isn't a woman alive who is going to do this for nothing," said Beverly Hanck, executive director of Infertility Awareness Association of Canada. The process for women to donate their eggs for in vitro fertilization (IVF) for one cycle takes 56 hours, she said.

    "We have polled our donors and 77 per cent have said they would not continue without appropriate compensation," said Cathy Roberto, executive director of the Toronto-based Repromed Ltd., the largest sperm bank in Canada.

    The bill would prevent the sperm bank from paying its donors a fee, currently $70 for each visit. Instead, donors will be given "a receipt-able expense."

    Currently, women can sell one cycle of their eggs for between $2,500 and $3,500 while couples in Canada typically pay surrogate mothers $18,000. Under the new law, however, surrogate mothers can be reimbursed for expenses and loss of work-related income.

    The debate over stem-cell research on human embryos pits the promise of medical breakthroughs against those opponents who argue it is an assault on the sanctity of life.

    Supporters of the long-awaited law argue that it will help scientists and researchers study stem cells for the regeneration and repair of tissues and organs damaged by trauma or disease.

    "Embryonic research will not disappear. It will simply move to other shores along with some of our best and brightest researchers," Mr. Munson said.

    The bill, which will officially become law as soon as it receives royal assent, will create the Assisted Human Reproduction Agency of Canada to monitor clinics that deal with IVF treatments and fertility. The agency will license and protect the health of those undergoing fertility procedures and provide for the collection of data.

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