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Thread: I'm tired of this #$%&-ing pain!!!!

  1. #21
    It all gets so old. I know I'm going to be in pain every day, all the time, and wonder how bad it will be tomorrow.............or tonight when I'd love to be able to go to sleep and forget about it for awhile.

    I don't like to go anywhere anymore. I never know what's going to make it worse, and moving of any kind usually does.

    I'm not in a w/c, yet. But I might as well be, the only chair I can stand to sit in at home is my old office chair with wheels. Get it? With wheels.....not funny, is it.

    I've been wondering lately, do children with sci injuries have to suffer with this evil neuropathy? Maybe I don't want to know.............it's too sad.

  2. #22

    So sorry

    So sorry for your pain, so sorry for my pain, so sorry my 10 yr. old has no parent to do activities with, so sorry I live on the coast and can't go to the beach, so sorry I can't go to the mall, so sorry I can't sit up long enough to go to the theater and watch a movie and I am so sorry to be sorry.


    I am thankful we all have a place to go and talk about this.

  3. #23
    Senior Member
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    it helps a little ( for me ), when after realizing that researchers/scientists don't really care about treating humans, which is why that even today NO effective pain therapy for those with chronic SCI can be found anywhere, to mock them, mock those who are stupid enough to believe that there will be a " someday ", or any day within the next 50 years + where a cure will arise like some phoenix out of the ashes!

  4. #24
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    After 33 years of paralysis with chronic, burning pain, I can relate to all the posts on this thread. As a retired pharmacist who is board certified in psychiatric pharmacy I waited for years to see some new medication developed that would stop or decrease the pain; instead, all I saw was drug companies secretly pushing the use of anticonvulsants (Tegretol, Neurontin, Lyrica) and antidepressants (amitriptyline, and many others as the years went by, with Cymbalta being the latest fad). These anticonvulsants and antidepressants were not making enough money for their intended FDA-approved uses, and the drug detail reps would tell docs (off the record) about their possible effectiveness in treating neuropathic or deafferentation pain secondary to SCI when prescribed for these "off-label" indications. So we saw thousands, if not millions of pain sufferers, being prescribed Neurontin or gabapentin at doses that would make us stupid and zombies, with little relief in pain, because the pharmaceutical manufacturers knew that they could make far more money getting prescribers to write scripts for these off-label uses. All of this was based on theoretical concepts of MOA models (that the mechanism of action of drugs that reduced transmission of nerve signals MIGHT work to ameliorate pain mediated by damaged spinal cords.) Or that with the antidepressants, by increasing levels of serotonin and/or norepinephrine at the synapses of receptors in central brain sites, could presumably interrupt the interpreted pain sensations from distal sites like severed cords or phantom pain. All of this was based on theories or anecdotal reports, not well-designed, double-blind studies that documented effectiveness. Meanwhile, those of us living with pain from SCI and millions of other pain sufferers were used as veritable guinea pigs for a drug industry that reaped millions of dollars trying unverified, presumptive medications that did little to reduce pain and suffering. And PHARMA laughed all the way to the bank.
    But opiates and THC derivatives were discouraged or made illegal; the feds prosecuted pain physicians who dared to prescribe opiates, and intimidated all other practitioners, leaving the thousands of us SCI pain sufferers to wish for some end to all of this, many to the point of suicide. And after a lifetime of this pain and paralysis, there is no significant research on the horizon, no cures imminent, nor any policy change on the part of the feds regarding the use of opiates or cannabis.
    So after three decades there has been no change in the delivery of care, particularly to non-veterans, still waiting for specialized SCI centers like that of the VA; no hopes of seeing a cure for paralysis in our lifetimes; and what's left of life trying to deal with chronic pain that the medical community refuses to accept or treat, instead offering up the latest placebo drug approved by the FDA for some other medical condition that "may" help with the pain but more often only adds side effects to the current medication regimen. sigh.......so much disappointment and unnecessary suffering.

  5. #25
    Grrrr, wince, grit, breath.
    Grrr, twist, wince, grit breath
    grr grit breath
    grit breat grit breath

    And all I want to do is just yell a massive....

    AAAAARAAAHHHHHHHoohhhhhGAAaaaarrrrrrrrRRRRRRAAaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa




    .....but its not going to change anything.

    Think I might go lie down.


    Cheers guys, Thanks for listening.

  6. #26
    source
    Quote Originally Posted by cdurfee99 View Post
    it helps a little ( for me ), when after realizing that researchers/scientists don't really care about treating humans, which is why that even today NO effective pain therapy for those with chronic SCI can be found anywhere, to mock them, mock those who are stupid enough to believe that there will be a " someday ", or any day within the next 50 years + where a cure will arise like some phoenix out of the ashes!
    Molecular, Anatomical, Physiological and Behavioral studies of rats treated with Buprenorphine.

    Santiago JM, Rosas OR, Torrado AI, González JD, Kalyan-Masih PO, González JD.
    University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus, Physiology, UPR-MSC Main Building 6th Floor A-682, San Juan, Puerto Rico, 00936, 787-758-2525 x 1615, 2915, 787-753-0120; jose.santiago13@upr.edu.
    Acute pain is a common symptom experienced after spinal cord injury (SCI). The presence of this pain calls for treatment with analgesics, such as buprenorphine. However, there are concerns that the drug may exert other effects besides alleviation of pain. Among those reported are in vitro changes in gene expression, apoptosis and necrosis. In this investigation, the effect of buprenorphine was assessed at the molecular, behavioral, electrophysiological and histological levels after SCI. Rats were injured at the T10 thoracic level using the NYU impactor device. Half of the animals received buprenorphine (0.05mg/kg) for 3 consecutive days immediately after SCI, and the other half were untreated. Microarray analysis (n=5) was performed and analyzed using the Array Assist software. The genes under study were grouped in four categories according to function: regeneration, apoptosis, second messengers, and nociceptive related genes. Microarrays analysis demonstrated no significant difference in gene expression between rats treated with buprenorphine and the control group at 2 and 4 days post injury (DPI). Experiments performed to determine the effect of buprenorphine at the electrophysiological (tcMMEP), behavioral (BBB, grid walking and beam crossing), and histological level (luxol staining). Reveal no significant difference at 7 and 14 DPI. In the return of nerve conduction, functional recovery, or white matter spare tissue between control and experimental groups (p>0.05, n=6). These results show that buprenorphine (0.05mg/kg) can be used as part of the post-operative care to reduce pain after SCI without affecting behavioral, physiological, or anatomical parameters. Key words: analgesic, behavior, microarrays, pain, spare tissue

    Pub Med Journal of nueroradiology May 2009
    Last edited by mckeownp; 06-04-2009 at 09:23 AM. Reason: source

  7. #27
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    Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic opiate. Buprenorphine is a List II drug of the Opium Law, though special rules and guidelines apply to its prescription and dispensation. In the USA, it has been a Schedule III drug under the United Nations' Convention on Psychotropic Substances. (per Wikipedia)

    Given the current federal attitudes towards opiates in the US, it is unlikely that physicians would prescribe it for SCI pain, regardless of efficacy shown after multiple trials.

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by jbpara View Post
    Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic opiate. Buprenorphine is a List II drug of the Opium Law, though special rules and guidelines apply to its prescription and dispensation. In the USA, it has been a Schedule III drug under the United Nations' Convention on Psychotropic Substances. (per Wikipedia)

    Given the current federal attitudes towards opiates in the US, it is unlikely that physicians would prescribe it for SCI pain, regardless of efficacy shown after multiple trials.
    I forgot to say this is saboxone...lol

  9. #29

    I hear ya!!

    I had a stimulator put in 3 months ago. Not helping much at all. Take more drugs than my body should be able to handle and still there is that Damn Pain!!! What I would give for a day being pain free!!!!!! Pain Sucks!!

  10. #30
    horrible fxxcking day. can't do anything want to scream

    all that I am is all gone

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