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Thread: Hello from Hong Kong

  1. #21
    Wise, you say they "get beyond" that stepping therapy in a few weeks. What do the move onward to?

    At TIRR, granted almost 9 years ago, I read an article about the benefits of standing. I'd done it in the pool, but then had bowel troubles and was banned from the pool. I nagged and nagged to be allowed in the standing frame! FINALLY they let me, I think mainly because I was nagging in front of my priest, and he was praising them for their life's vocation and saying how wonderful it must be to have employment that salvages people's very lives. In short, he reminded them why they had gone into PT to begin with...and it wasn't to tell people "No" when they were trying to get better! (You never know when a dude w/ a traveling Communion kit will come in handy. I loved that Episcopalian, he brought me Communion in rehab. So very kind. I needed spiritual backup badly at that point.)

    I had known I had muscles firing but the PT's couldn't feel them yet, so they decided it was spasms. This led them to believe the standing frame was a waste of time for me. It wasn't. It actually made the muscles in my leg strong enough to be felt by a person outside my body, which made me eligible for the suspended treadmill study that got me back on my feet again.

    Jim, what are you wearing on your head?

  2. #22
    c473s, did get to hang with Dr Tansey, he's a good guy.

    Betheny, it's called a receding hairline

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    c473s, did get to hang with Dr Tansey, he's a good guy.

    Betheny, it's called a receding hairline
    He has been a great addition for us and the translational lab should be up late fall.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by betheny View Post
    Wise, you say they "get beyond" that stepping therapy in a few weeks. What do the move onward to?

    At TIRR, granted almost 9 years ago, I read an article about the benefits of standing. I'd done it in the pool, but then had bowel troubles and was banned from the pool. I nagged and nagged to be allowed in the standing frame! FINALLY they let me, I think mainly because I was nagging in front of my priest, and he was praising them for their life's vocation and saying how wonderful it must be to have employment that salvages people's very lives. In short, he reminded them why they had gone into PT to begin with...and it wasn't to tell people "No" when they were trying to get better! (You never know when a dude w/ a traveling Communion kit will come in handy. I loved that Episcopalian, he brought me Communion in rehab. So very kind. I needed spiritual backup badly at that point.)

    I had known I had muscles firing but the PT's couldn't feel them yet, so they decided it was spasms. This led them to believe the standing frame was a waste of time for me. It wasn't. It actually made the muscles in my leg strong enough to be felt by a person outside my body, which made me eligible for the suspended treadmill study that got me back on my feet again.

    Jim, what are you wearing on your head?
    I am referring to making the transition from weight-supported stepping on treadmill to over-ground weight-bearing stepping. I love the story about the priest. You sure do bring unusual weapons to fights.

    Wise.
    Last edited by Wise Young; 05-06-2009 at 11:44 AM.

  5. #25
    Senior Member cypresss's Avatar
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    Does anyone know details about the injury type? ( a level, a ASIA scale after surgery/decompression) or anything ?

    I bet that the effort for the "man in blue" is huge, especially when he have to help to "walk" a hight-quad. I remember that in US is something similar but they were using a treadmil. Also I know about the Lokomat.

    many thx for sharing those news and pics
    Last edited by cypresss; 05-06-2009 at 11:17 AM.
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  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by cypresss View Post
    Does anyone know details about the injury type? ( a level, a ASIA scale after surgery/decompression) or anything ?

    I bet that the effort for the "man in blue" is huge, especially when he have to help to "walk" a hight-quad. I remember that in US is something similar but they were using a treadmil. Also I know about the Lokomat.

    many thx for sharing those news and pics
    Most of the patients in the pictures were ASIA A at the time of surgery (between 2-60 days after injury) but some had become incomplete after the surgery and started recovering. In Kunming, they have developed a new surgical approach, when combined with intensive locomotor training, apparently will allow as many as 50% of "complete" (ASIA A) patients recover unassisted locomotion. This of course needs to be confirmed with further clinical trials.

    We are very interested in the intensive locomotor training program for our clinical trials for the following reasons.

    1. So many of patients did recover unassisted walking after the surgery that had made them ASIA B or C. In some ways, this would be analogous to regenerative therapy making chronic ASIA A patients become incomplete.

    2. It is the most intensive locomotor training program that we have seen. It does differ from all the programs in Europe and the U.S., all of which have not shown significant improvement of locomotion in ASIA A patients.

    3. The locomotor training appears to be beneficial for the patients in other ways, including much lower incidences of bladder infection and decubiti, and reduced constipation.

    The treadmill training is more labor intensive and cannot accomodate as many subjects. At the Kunming Army General Hospital, they actually can train over a hundred patients a day.

    Wise.

  7. #27
    With 1-3 staff members per patient for 6 hrs per day, treating 100 patients a day is impressive to say the least!
    “As the cast of villains in SCI is vast and collaborative, so too must be the chorus of hero's that rise to meet them” Ramer et al 2005

  8. #28
    First thing Monday morning the neurosurgeons observed myelotomy surgeries of 2 newly injured patients. I know one patient was injected with cells, not sure what type.

    While the neurosurgeons were observing operations, the rest of the group met at the Spinal Cord Injury Center at Kunming Army Hospital. We were greeted with open arms by the staff, which seemed to consist of mostly nurses. It was a beautiful morning, the windows were open and a nice breeze was circulating throughout the center. The halls were filled with walking patients, most using rolling upper body supported walkers, some with 4 point walkers, a few with crutches and a few with nothing at all. We watched the walking for a while, listened to their stories, asked their levels of injury, and when they were injured. We were then led to the occupational therapy room. There were about a half dozen stations with different activities. I visited with a few patients and heard their stories through translation. Two were injured working in a mine.


    The SCI Center at Kunming Army General Hospital had about 105 SCI Patients. Many patients’ family members help with their care/walking while other families hire aids to assist there loved ones. After spending a short time at the hospital, it became very apparent it was a special place, and the spirits of the people made it that way. The staff of nurses seemed to run the show, and the patients followed. These patients would walk 10 hrs a day if their very enthusiastic director, asked them to. They will do whatever it takes to have a chance of improving. From what I observed, there is much improvement happening in Kunming.

    That morning we were told a 10 year old girl who had lost her leg in the earthquake was being brought to the hospital. Because of her positive attitude and beaming smile, she had become a nation symbol of hope. The military leaders of the hospital were present, as well as the media. I was honored to meet her. She said a few words to me in English, a very special moment.

    The rest of the day was spent discussing/debating the possible protocols for US Clinical Trials. This was very interesting and I learned a lot.

    Tue- We watched about 25 patients playing around in the pool. It brought me back to the days I was a Shepherd and enjoyed the warm pool. They also had a hot tub filled with herbs the patients soaked in. I was surprised by how many patients were walking around in the pool “normally”. At first I thought they were PT Aids, but was told they were patients.

    We were next brought to the ICU, which had 5 patients, including 3 that were operated on Monday. This room brought back some wonderful memories, as I’m sure you can imagine. Those patients I saw unconscious in the ICU are probably up walking now. To me this is incredible, to them, routine.

    That night we all met for dinner to mark the end of our trip to China. It was really more of a celebration. From the second we sat down, the food didn’t stop coming. All sorts of dishes, everything I tried was excellent. I must admit, I passed on the hundred year old egg though. The food isn’t the only thing that didn’t stop coming. For as long as we were there, the toasts never stopped. A toast to Neurosurgeons, to China, to the US, to China and the US, person-to-person toasts, on and on, for hours. It was quite an experience, something I will never forget.

    The patients I saw in the ICU may very likely be up walking today, giving them the best chance of recovering. Soon, Lithium and Cord Blood will be added to the mix. This very special Hospital in the South of China is on its way to finding a cure for paralysis. We need to join them. I think most of us who visited felt like the baton was passed to us and it is our turn to run with it. They have found a way to fund their trials, and we must do the same. Many people like Dr Young have worked very hard and have dedicated their lives to bettering ours. Now is the time to thank them by coming together and raising the funds to make these clinical trials happen NOW.

    Lets Do This!

    Email me if you want to help- jimbenn@rci.rutgers.edu

  9. #29

    more pictures

    I have many pictures, what do you want to see?

  10. #30

    dr.wise

    Dr.wise can you tell us how close you are to a brake though And if you can tell us in simple terms you say the patients in kunming is up and trying to walk in a faw weeks do you know what cells they got.You say that you hope to star trials in the summer 09 hopeful come 2011 will see a big brake thought wood this be right there is a lot more to ask
    Last edited by skeaman; 05-08-2009 at 06:30 AM.

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