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Thread: Paraplegic Man Suffers Spider Bite, Walks Again

  1. #31
    Here is an interesting discussion. No one has really addressed verification of his original injury (ie, ASIA exam, MRI, etc.) and if he actually had a cord injury or a conversion reaction (very possible) or other non-physical cause for his paralysis. Interestingly, he is now in jail for domestic violence, so this is not just an ordinary guy but someone who apparently has a shady past as well.

    http://www.theskepticsguide.org/sgublog/?p=519

    We have several discussions of this that probably should be combined, and will also ask Dr. Young to wade in on this.

    (KLD)

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    Here is an interesting discussion. No one has really addressed verification of his original injury (ie, ASIA exam, MRI, etc.) and if he actually had a cord injury or a conversion reaction (very possible) or other non-physical cause for his paralysis. Interestingly, he is now in jail for domestic violence, so this is not just an ordinary guy but someone who apparently has a shady past as well.

    http://www.theskepticsguide.org/sgublog/?p=519

    We have several discussions of this that probably should be combined, and will also ask Dr. Young to wade in on this.

    (KLD)
    KLD asked me to "wade in on this".

    I had refrained earlier because I felt that I had little to contribute that people have not already posted. The link that you posted is interesting but as speculative as the rest, suggesting that the person really started walking after 20 years because he had 8 months of rehabilitation rather than the spider bite.

    So, let me approach this questions from another point of view. Let us suppose that the person was really bitten by a brown recluse spider, that the man had intensive rehabilitation that emphasized locomotion, and that he really does have spinal cord injury.

    1. There is no information that I am aware of, in animal or human, that the venom of the brown recluse spider is beneficial for spinal cord injury or any other condition. It is the prevalent of the poisonous spiders in the United States and the venom is cytotoxic (kills cells) and hemolytic (damages blood cells). Local tissue reactions to the venom causes dermonecrotic arachnidism and systemic loxoscelism. Several components of the venom is of interest. Hyaluronidase has chondroitinase activity. Chondroitinase, as some here know, breaks down chondroitin-6-sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG), an extracellular matrix protein at the injury site that is known to stop axonal growth. The inflammation is also of interest because cytokines are known to initiate neurotrophic factor responses and to stimulate production of stem cells. However, it is not clear at all how a spider bite to the extremity will do anything to the spinal cord, even if it did initiate a strong local and systemic inflammatory reaction. Finally, there are questions whether many of the reports of brown recluse spider envenomation may be due to misdiagnoses MRSA infections. According to http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/772295-overview
    Brown recluse venom, like many of the other brown spider venoms, is cytotoxic and hemolytic. It contains at least 8 components, including enzymes such as hyaluronidase, deoxyribonuclease, ribonuclease, alkaline phosphatase, and lipase. Sphingomyelinase D is thought to be the protein component responsible for most of the tissue destruction and hemolysis caused by brown recluse spider envenomation. The intense inflammatory response mediated by arachidonic acid, prostaglandins, and chemotactic infiltration of neutrophils is amplified further by an intrinsic vascular cascade involving the mediator C.

    <snip>

    Although various species of Loxosceles are found throughout the world, L reclusus is found in the United States from the East to the West Coast, with predominance in the south. Recently, reports of persons with "spider bites" presenting to emergency departments have reached near urban legend proportions, prompting many physicians to question the diagnosis of a brown recluse bite in nonendemic areas. The list of conditions that can present in a similar fashion to that of a brown recluse spider envenomation is extensive. A more likely explanation for this epidemic of spider bites is in fact community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) skin infections.
    2. Intensive locomotor training can result in return of ability to walk, especially in people who have incomplete injuries and did not seriously try to walk for many years. This has been reported by several groups. In 1995, a German physiatrist team reported that weight-supported treadmill training restored walking to people with "incomplete" spinal cord injury, some as long as ten or more years after injury. This was the basis of all the effort to train people with spinal cord injury.

    3. Did the person have spinal cord injury? This may seem to be a facetious question, but I have often encountered misdiagnoses of spinal cord injury. The person has been reported to have "paraplegia". He may have an injury to the lower spinal column, i.e. L2 or below, that did not damage the spinal cord but rather caused cauda equina injury. People with cauda equina are often able to walk with bracing. From the videos that I have seen, he clearly has bracing of his knees and ankles (http://www.breitbart.tv/?p=297433&comments=1).

    Wise.

  3. #33
    A waiter in our regular restaurant was off for a week, and when we asked what happened to him, they told us that he was at the hospital with an IV because he was bitten by a spider, his whole arm was swollen from the bite. After 5 days he was fine.


    Don't want any bites.

    manouli.

  4. #34
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/livescience/...orbadreporting

    Seems like the media is catching on that this is the stuff of tabloids, not reality.

  5. #35
    so many people have been asking me about this so i had to see what you all had to say, and, it was as i thought.......from the guy's surroundings i would guess that he wasn't exactly sent to barrow's or craig's 20yrs ago. plus, he's fathered 2 kids since then.........his plumbing must work just fine......if he is an SCI it must be a really low-level one....Steve.

  6. #36
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    What is a black widow spider?
    A black widow spider is a small, shiny, black, button-shaped spider with a red hourglass mark on its abdomen, and prefers warm climates. Black widow spider bites release a toxin that can cause damage to the nervous system, thus emergency medical treatment is necessary.
    What are the symptoms of a black widow spider bite?
    The following are the most common symptoms of a black widow spider bite. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:

    • immediate pain, burning, swelling, and redness at the site (double fang marks may be seen) cramping pain and muscle rigidity in the stomach, chest, shoulders, and back
    • headache
    • dizziness
    • rash and itching
    • restlessnes and anxiety
    • sweating
    • eyelid swelling
    • nausea or vomiting
    • salivation, tearing of the eyes
    • weakness, tremors, or paralysis, especially in the legs

    These symptoms of a black widow spider bite may resemble other conditions or medical problems. Always consult your physician for a diagnosis.
    Treatment for a black widow spider bite:
    Specific treatment for a black widow spider bite will be determined by your physician. Treatment may include:

    • Wash the area well with soap and water.
    • Apply a cold or ice pack wrapped in a cloth, or a cold, wet washcloth to the site.
    • To protect against infection, particularly in children, apply an antibiotic lotion or cream.
    • Give acetaminophen for pain.
    • Seek immediate emergency care for further treatment. Depending on the severity of the bite, treatment may include muscle relaxants, pain relievers and other medications, and supportive care. Antivenin may be needed, although it is usually not required. Hospitalization may be needed.
    • Prompt treatment is essential to avoid more serious complications, especially in children.
    Something that is well diagnosed can be cured well."Hail Caesar! Those who are about to die salute you!" - Said by gladiators before they fought. Often cited with "salutamus" ("we . . . salute") in place of "salutant."

  7. #37
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    Spiders do not heal ...they kill .
    http://www.ascendedhealth.com/brown-...te-picture.htm
    Something that is well diagnosed can be cured well."Hail Caesar! Those who are about to die salute you!" - Said by gladiators before they fought. Often cited with "salutamus" ("we . . . salute") in place of "salutant."

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