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Thread: Media Advisory - Canada's Man In Motion to Announce First Annual Rick Hansen Wheels In Motion Ontario Events/Man in motion encourages people to take to wheels for spinal chord injury

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    Media Advisory - Canada's Man In Motion to Announce First Annual Rick Hansen Wheels In Motion Ontario Events/Man in motion encourages people to take to wheels for spinal chord injury

    Media Advisory - Canada's Man In Motion to Announce First Annual Rick Hansen Wheels In Motion Ontario Events

    TORONTO, May 20 /CNW/ -

    WHO: Canada's Man In Motion - Rick Hansen
    Members of the Rick Hansen Wheels In Motion event team from the
    Toronto General & Western Hospital Foundation and special
    guests

    WHAT: Official Ontario Rick Hansen Wheels In Motion kick-off of new
    national awareness and fundraising event for spinal cord injury
    (SCI).

    WHEN: Wednesday May 21, 2003
    10:30 to 11:30 am

    WHERE: Festival Stage, Ontario Place
    Ontario Place Corporation
    Far East Entrance, Ontario Place Boulevard, Toronto
    (416)314-9773

    WHY: June 14, 2003, the first annual Rick Hansen Wheels In Motion
    will roll out across Canada. People of all ages will wheel,
    bike, skate, run or walk to improve the quality of life for
    people with spinal cord injury. Fifty percent of net proceeds
    raised will stay in the communities to improve the quality of
    life of people with SCI living there. The other fifty percent
    will support SCI research, ultimately leading to a cure.

    From 1985 -1987, Rick Hansen, ignited the passion and interest
    of the world as he wheeled the circumference of the Earth in
    his wheelchair to raise awareness and funds for spinal cord
    injury during the record-setting odyssey, "Man In Motion World
    Tour." Today, Rick Hansen is President and CEO of the Rick
    Hansen Man In Motion Foundation, created to accelerate
    improvements to the quality of life of people with spinal cord
    injury.



    -30-

    For further information: and/or interviews with Rick Hansen please
    contact: Lorraine Wilson, 604-709-6346, cellular 604-351-9205;
    www.rickhansen.com

    [This message was edited by Max on 05-23-03 at 02:51 PM.]

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    Man in motion encourages people to take to wheels for spinal chord injury

    Man in motion encourages people to take to wheels for spinal chord injury


    canada.com


    Wednesday, May 21, 2003

    TORONTO (CP) -- The wheelchair athlete who pushed himself around the world to raise money for spinal chord research 16 years ago is now urging people to take to their own wheels for the cause.

    "We're going to ask Canadians to get on wheels one day a year until eventually we get people with spinal chord injuries off wheels," Rick Hansen said Wednesday in an interview.

    The event, dubbed Rick Hansen Wheels In Motion, is slated for June 14 in more than 100 communities nationwide, with participants pledging to wheel, bike, skate, or run or walk to raise money.

    "The time is right to launch an annual awareness and fundraising event," said Hansen, a father of three who was just a teenager when, 30 years ago, he lost the use of his legs in a car accident.

    In conversation studded with inspirational epithets honed after a decade and a half of motivational speaking, Hansen explained his dream is ultimately to take the campaign worldwide.

    In addition to raising money, Hansen said one of his goals is to encourage people with spinal chord injuries to share their stories.

    "We should be asking people with spinal chord injury what are their priorities?"

    He estimated 50 per cent of those with spinal chord injuries are living in the community, removed from a system that would keep them on the front lines of research or advocacy efforts. The prospect of bringing them into his fundraising efforts on a large scale clearly inspires him.

    "What I'm hopeful here is that through Wheels in Motion we can find them again," said Hansen as he shifted forward in his wheelchair to prop his robust torso over still legs. "We can ask them to get involved."

    He pointed to remarkable advances in the treatment of spinal chord injury in recent years that has seen people recovering full or partial use of function.

    Former B.C. premier Mike Harcourt, who has pledged to work with Hansen, has staged a remarkable recovery from a near paralysing fall last November. Although it was feared he would never walk again after the accident pinched the spinal cord in his neck, the 60-year-old has rebounded. Through extensive rehabilitation he has even been walking with the help of canes.

    "That's the ultimate vision, is to get to the point where people with spinal chord injuries have a return to full physical function after their injuries and maybe the wheelchair might even be something we'll see in a museum," said Hansen.

    He acknowledged that there are many similar events that have people running for cures or walking for awareness, but hopes his campaign has a wide appeal.

    "In every story of a person with spinal chord injury there's a lesson to be learned," said Hansen, suggesting his goal is not only to raise money for a cure, but to urge accident prevention as well.

    About one in three Canadians know someone with a spinal chord injury, he said.

    He also suggested those who've suffered spinal chord injury also present a compelling role model for people looking to overcome their own obstacles.

    Half of the Wheels in Motion proceeds are to stay in the communities where they are raised to improve life for people with spinal cord injuries. The rest is slated for research on a cure.

    Hansen announced Wednesday he will participate in the Toronto portion of the event this year.

    He said he's looking forward to future travel with the campaign so he can continue to meet other people dedicated to the cause. "New money helps, but the ideas behind it are what I think is important."

    The British Columbia native is best known for his 1985-86 Man In Motion tour, a round-the-world odyssey he took in his wheelchair to raise awareness of people with disabilities.

    Although it has been 16 years since his profile was at its highest peak, Hansen has continued his advocacy work. He formed a foundation in 1987 and it has raised $148 million for spinal cord research, prevention, awareness, rehabilitation and disabled sport.

    "I was asked many times, 'Why didn't you do this right at the end of the tour?' I wasn't ready to bear that responsibility," he said.

    "I've come full circle to recognizing it's where I want to be. It's where I want to contribute."

    He has been involved in many projects, among them even meeting with Canadian Space Agency and NASA officials to have a researcher with a spinal cord injury studying in a weightless environment at the international space station by 2007.

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    Scarborough hosts Hansen's Wheels in Motion fundraiser

    Scarborough hosts Hansen's Wheels in Motion fundraiser


    SUSAN O'NEILL

    06/08/03 00:00:00
    Organizers of Scarborough's first Rick Hansen Wheels in Motion fundraiser are encouraging local residents to lace up their in-line skates or hop on their bikes June 14 to raise money for those living with spinal cord injuries.
    Scarborough is one of 150 communities across Canada that is launching the event this year in an effort to improve the quality of life of the 37,000 Canadians with spinal cord injuries.

    "We invite people to participate by volunteering, sponsoring or participating at the event," said event organizer Paul Baker, president of the Scarborough Cedarbrae Golden Mile Lions Club.

    "We are very excited about supporting Canada's Man in Motion, Rick Hansen, and helping people with spinal cord injury."

    In 1985, Hansen embarked on a unique journey around the world. He travelled over 40,000 kilometres in his wheelchair, through 34 countries and four continents on his Man in Motion World Tour.

    His journey lasted two years, two months and two days. He raised $24 million for spinal cord injury research.

    INSPIRATION

    "Rick has inspired so many people and we are proud that the people of Scarborough have generously come forward to be part of this national initiative," Baker said.

    He added that somewhere between 200 to 400 people are expected to take part in the local event, which gets under way in the main parking lot at Thomson Park at 9 a.m., near Brimley Road and Lawrence Avenue East.

    "As a grassroots event the primary focus is on spinal cord injury prevention," Baker said, noting the fund-raising goal is secondary this year.

    Fifty per cent of the proceeds raised will be directed towards supporting quality of life initiatives in the community and the other half will go towards research into spinal cord injuries.

    "It will become an annual event," Baker said, noting that anyone interested in participating can register at the park on the day of the event.

    Participants can bike, in-line skate, walk or jog the route.

    Baker said there will also be lots of give-a-ways including a draw for a package of four return tickets on VIA Rail's Windsor-Quebec corridor. For more information about Wheels in Motion, call 416-657-2024. For information on the Man in Motion Foundation, visit www.rickhansen.com.
    http://www.insidetoronto.ca/to/scarb...-1338262c.html

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    MONEY WILL TALK EVENTUALLY!!

    HOPEFULLY THE RICK HANSEN WHEEL,RUN,BIKE EVENT THIS SAT.JUNE 14 WILL RAISE AWARENESS ACROSS THIS COUNTRY, AND GET THE WHOLE SPINAL CORD INJURY ISSUE IN EVERYBODY'S 'FACE'. THEN SOME PRESSURE WILL START TO HAVE MORE OF AN IMPACT ON RESEARCH AND FUNDING FOR TREATMENTS THAT ARE STARTING TO BE AVAILABLE. THIS EVENT WILL BECOME AN ANNUAL THING, SO LET'S RAISE LOTS AND LOTS OF MONEY, AND GET THE 'WHEELS IN MOTION'. MY SON, BRIAN IS 19 YRS.WITH T5 INJURY, AND HE IS A PARTICIPANT, ALONG WITH MYSELF,ANOTHER SON, MY SISTER,2 NIECES, AND WE ARE ALL TAKING PLEDGES. LET'S JUST SEE HOW MUCH OF A DIFFERENCE ONE DAY A YEAR CAN MAKE IN RAISING MONEY. WE'RE ON A ROLL. HOPE IT DOESN'T RAIN.
    CHRIS B.

    [This message was edited by chris B. on 06-11-03 at 10:13 AM.]

    [This message was edited by chris B. on 06-12-03 at 09:04 PM.]

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    Canada's Man In Motion visits Ottawa

    Canada's Man In Motion visits Ottawa

    VANCOUVER, June 9 /CNW/ -

    Wednesday, June 11, 2003

    9:00am - 10:00am Poster Winners Meeting - Ottawa Children's
    Treatment Centre
    Photo Op 395 Smythe Road, Ottawa
    Hansen meets with three winners, and their parents
    and teachers, of an elementary school Rick Hansen
    Wheels In Motion poster contest, organized by the
    local volunteer team.

    10:30 to 12:00 pm School Presentation - R. Byrns Currie Public School
    Photo Op 185 Owl Drive, Ottawa
    Hansen delivers motivational presentation "Never
    Give Up On Your Dreams", and presents 20 students
    with The Rick Hansen Award, that recognizes
    outstanding student leadership and activities that
    demonstrate social responsibility, goal
    accomplishment, determination and perseverance to
    overcome obstacles and/or disabilities. Recipients
    are chosen by a committee of teachers within the
    school.

    1:00pm to 1:45pm Announcement of Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury
    Media Briefing Leadership Fund - Parliament Hill
    Room 263S, Centre Block
    Official announcement of the Government of Canada's
    support for the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury
    Leadership Fund, with Stephen Owen, Secretary of
    State for Western Economic Diversification and
    Indian Affairs and North Development and Rick
    Hansen President and CEO, Rick Hansen Man In Motion
    Foundation.

    From 1985-1987, Rick Hansen, ignited the passion and interest of the
    world as he wheeled the 40,000 km. circumference of the earth in his
    wheelchair to raise awareness and funds for spinal cord injury during the
    record-setting "Man In Motion World Tour." Today, Rick Hansen is President and
    CEO of the Rick Hansen Man In Motion Foundation, created to accelerate
    improvements to the quality of life of people with spinal cord injury.

    www.rickhansen.com



    -30-

    For further information: Media Contact: Sarah Sugiyama, 604-822-0129,
    cellular 604-518-6674
    RICK HANSEN MAN IN MOTION FOUNDATION has 33 releases in this database.





    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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    Spinal cord research funded by wheel event

    Spinal cord research funded by wheel event


    Jun. 9, 2003

    Barrie is one of approximately 150 Canadian communities participating in Rick Hansen Wheels In Motion, on Saturday, June 14, to make a positive difference in the quality of life of people with spinal cord injury.
    In the spirit of the original Man In Motion World Tour, people of all ages - backed by pledges and donations - are invited to wheel along a designated course on bicycles, wheelchairs, inline skates, scooters or by walking or jogging along. The Barrie event, organized by a local resident, Maarit Stienwedel, will be held at Centennial Beach; registration will be starting at 9 a.m.

    With the support of presenting partner Scotiabank, Rick Hansen is focusing on accelerating improvements to the quality of life of people with spinal-cord injury. Fifty per cent of net proceeds will be used to support quality of life initiatives in the community. The other 50 per cent will support research, including finding a cure.

    "We invite people to participate by volunteering to join the organizing team or to sponsor or to participate at the event," said Stienwedel. "We are very excited about supporting Canada's Man In Motion, Rick Hansen and helping people with spinal cord injury. Rick has inspired so many people and we are proud that the people of Barrie have generously come forward to be a part of this national initiative."

    Hansen has always dreamed big. As the only person to have circled the world in a wheelchair, he wheeled 40,000 kilometres on his Man In Motion World Tour (1985-87) through 34 countries, raising $24 million for spinal-cord injury. Now, as founder of the Rick Hansen Man In Motion Foundation and CEO of the Rick Hansen Institute, he hopes his new dream will touch all Canadians.

    "We are at an exciting threshold," Hansen says. "We face huge challenges to improve quality of life, but the benefits are immeasurable - not only for individuals, but for society as a whole. We are asking everyone to join us, participate in our signature event and get on wheels every year until we ultimately find a cure. Together we can make this dream a reality."

    For local event information, call Maarit Stienwedel at 728-6669. For information on the Rick Hansen Man In Motion Foundation, or on the Wheels in Motion event, www.rickhansen.com. http://www.simcoe.com/sc/barrie/stor...-1341312c.html

  7. #7
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    Rick Hansen starts his Wheels In Motion campaign

    Rick Hansen starts his Wheels In Motion campaign

    Doug Ward
    Vancouver Sun


    Monday, June 09, 2003

    CREDIT: Stuart Davis, Vancouver Sun

    Rick Hansen speaks to students from his namesake school in Abbotsford in preparation for the start of his Wheels in Motion campaign. The inaugural event is this Saturday.


    CREDIT: Stuart Davis, Vancouver Sun

    Rick Hansen takes the lead in kickstarting the Wheels in Motion fund-raising campaign at Rick Hansen secondary last week.


    The location is an Abbotsford gym, three days ago, but the scene is very Rick Hansen circa the mid-'80s.

    There's the familiar David Foster refrain. An introduction where he's described as Canada's "greatest hero." An inspirational message from the Man In Motion with remarks about heart and courage. A short video where he tells Canadians that "anything is possible."

    The congregants listening rapt to Hansen's evangelism are about 800 students in the gymnasium of Rick Hansen secondary school in Abbotsford.

    The president and CEO of the Rick Hansen Institute is kickstarting another eponymous fund-raising campaign -- the new Rick Hansen Wheels In Motion campaign.

    Tens of thousands of Canadians are expected to participate in the inaugural event this Saturday -- jogging, walking, cycling or wheeling over a designated course and backed by donations and pledges.

    Sixteen years after his epic 40,000-kilometre Man In Motion tour around the world raised $26 million, Hansen is still an icon. An untarnished brand name. A fund-raising juggernaut. A collector of friends and colleagues willing to follow Hansen's dreams.

    Hansen heads out of the gym to the track, followed by the students and accompanied by a small entourage that includes Don Alder, his boyhood friend from Williams Lake who was with Hansen in the back of that pickup truck, the one that flipped more than 30 years ago this month, leaving him paralysed.

    Hansen leads the students around the track and then stops and shakes their hands as they head out to complete a three-kilometre course for the Wheels In Motion campaign.

    "Oh, my God. I can't believe Rick Hansen is really here. When everyone started cheering for him, I could feel myself shaking," said Rajvinder Dhillon, a Grade 10 student.

    Hansen's rock-star presence is a reminder that while most charitable causes are worthy, few are personified by a national hero capable of attracting money from students, mill workers, corporate heads, government bureaucrats and politicians.

    The total amount of money now linked to Hansen, much of it government dollars provided for projects connected to him, now stands at $148 million.

    The students at Rick Hansen hoped to raise $2,500 for the new campaign. Hansen's goal for Wheels In Motion is $1 million this year and $10 million a year by the fifth year.

    The idea behind Wheels In Motion isn't new. Hansen was urged in the months after the 1985-87 Man In Motion tour to put his name on an annual event. He wasn't ready for it. He was 29, newly married and was weary of being a poster boy. He wanted to return to athletic competition. Or, perhaps, become a phys. ed. teacher.

    Hansen wasn't comfortable with how the Man In Motion campaign had become all about him, nor was he happy about living in a fishbowl. He wasn't ready for another campaign with his name on it.

    Now he is. He's a 46-year-old father of three young daughters. He's grown used to his name being on any number of agencies, institutions, research chairs, secondary schools. A passionate fisherman, he's the chair of the Fraser River Sturgeon Conservation Society and the Pacific Salmon Endowment Fund Society.

    He's accepted celebrity and excels at exploiting it for a greater cause. In an era when the competition for health care research dollars is fierce, Hansen has managed to turn spinal cord research into a hot cause, said Susan Paish, a long-time Hansen friend who is a partner with the blue-ribbon law firm Fasken Martineau DuMoulin.

    "I'm not an anthropologist, but at a human level we are more inclined to give to causes that we not only believe in but where we feel a human connection with the person driving the cause," said Paish.

    "And that's the magic of Hansen."

    The magic doesn't just work with high school students.

    Lyall Knott, a social friend of Hansen and a prominent Vancouver lawyer, said that Hansen's appeal extends to people with money and influence.

    "I've been there where senior executives of major corporations will approach him and volunteer to raise money with him," said Knott.

    "He's a man with a mission and to get there he needs a treasury."

    Spinal cord research was formerly, in Hansen's own words, often the bridesmaid when it came to government funding. Not any more.

    There's the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Network, funded by a $15-million grant announced in the last federal budget. There's the $13 million given by Ottawa last year to the Rick Hansen Institute, the University of B.C. and Vancouver Hospital to build the ICORD Centre (International Collaboration for Repair Discoveries), the $46-million facility to be located at the hospital.

    The $13 million came from the Centre for Innovation in Ottawa after the ICORD proposal was judged worthy by an international panel of scientists. (The amount was subsequently matched by the province.) Hansen wasn't the applicant. He didn't write the proposal. The science guys did. But many of B.C.'s top spinal cord research experts credit Hansen for making it happen, pulling the ICORD team together.

    "Rick is the inspirational glue and foundation of what we do," said Dr. John Steeves, the director of ICORD.

    "We've been working together for over 15 years and have been able to build spinal cord research capacity in Vancouver like no other place on earth."

    There are many people responsible for the development of ICORD, said Steeves, and the new momentum in spinal cord research -- Hansen is just one of them.

    "But could we have put this all together without him? No. If that wasn't the case, why wasn't it done in Montreal or Toronto?"

    Again, the reason might be the ability of Hansen, through his media persona and charismatic personality, to provide a human dimension to a cause.

    "Let's not kid ourselves -- our society is very strongly influenced by personalities. We like movie stars, rock stars, the Biography channel," said Steeves.

    "Whether we like it or not, people want to know about the individual behind the work. But I must say that I've never found Rick to be anything other than thankless in his endeavours. The fact that people want to make him a national icon is an unintended consequence."

    How Hansen's name and charisma can translate into money can be seen in the origins of his new Wheels In Motion campaign. It costs money to produce and market an event like this one. Hansen needed a presenting sponsor.

    He found one accidentally through lawyer Paish. One day two years ago, Paish was talking with a friend, Scotiabank senior vice-president Bev Voice, who was looking for someone to give an inspirational speech to a meeting of Scotiabank branch managers.

    Paish suggested Hansen and then approached him about doing the speaking gig. You never know where it might lead, the lawyer told him. The branch managers loved the speech. So did Voice, who suggested to Hansen that they should meet in the future to see if he and the bank could work together on some projects.

    Sometime later, Hansen told her that his Man In Motion Foundation was looking for a presenting sponsor for an annual fund-raising event to be called Wheels In Motion. Scotiabank jumped at the opportunity, providing $300,000 for this year's inaugural event.

    Business groups are drawn to someone like Hansen. Spinal cord research is a compelling cause and a public association with Hansen can't help but enhance a company's brand image.

    "It's a win, win for everybody," said Scotiabank's Voice.

    Politicians are also drawn to Hansen. "What politician wouldn't want to be seen in Rick Hansen's presence?," said Paish. "Can he call up most business or political people in this province and strike up a conversation? Yeah, I think so. He's one of those guys who gets his phone calls returned."

    Not surprisingly, Hansen has been approached by most major political parties -- the federal Liberals, Progressive Conservatives and Social Credit -- to run for office. Mike Harcourt, when he was NDP leader, asked Hansen to run for his party. Hansen has always declined.

    Instead, Hansen worked with UBC to leverage money out of governments for research chairs and other programs related to spinal cord research. UBC vice-president Dennis Pavlich called Hansen "a superb marketer with communication skills that are incomparable."

    Pavlich said it's inaccurate to say that Hansen's success stems strictly from the Man In Motion tour. He compares the upward trajectory of Hansen's career to cancer victim Steve Fonyo's slide into relative obscurity after he completed his high-profile walk across Canada.

    "Look at Steve Fonyo who raised millions with his walk across Canada. He had a vision but it wasn't well-articulated. He wasn't a great communicator. If you don't have those additional skills, having a high profile won't do it."

    Wolfram Tetzlaff is the Rick Hansen Man In Motion Chair in Spinal Cord Research at UBC, one of five relatively new spinal cord research chairs here worth about $16 million.

    Tetzlaff credits Hansen for "building the political will" to fund spinal cord research. "Someone has to go out there, raise funds, convince politicians, line everybody up."

    A recent discovery by Tetzlaff and Dr. Brian Kwon, an orthopedic spine surgeon, has given renewed hope to those living with paralysis and more credence to Hansen's motto that anything is possible.

    The researchers discovered that nerve cells, previously thought to shrink and die after a spinal cord injury, can be regenerated with the application of a hormone-like substance.

    It was previously believed that only people with fresh spinal cord injuries could benefit from therapy. Now many researchers believe that future therapies could improve the mobility of people with chronic, long-term injury.

    Hansen draws a salary of $192,382 from UBC -- a pay rate comparable to the salary received by a university vice-president or a dean. (He has one corporate directorship, Nike Canada, a company that provided support during the tour.)

    It's a high salary but probably far less than what he could have made as a shill for any number of companies and products.

    "Rick Hansen is an advertiser's dream," said Paish. "He's a family guy, comes from a small town, he's got all the attributes any corporation would love to associate their products with.

    "And when Rick came back from the Man In Motion tour he barely had two nickels to rub together. And he had every opportunity to turn that project into personal gain, but he didn't.

    "He turned his energy into the cause."

    In his autobiography, Hansen wrote: "People, I gather, have always wondered (a) how much money I earn and (b) how much money I made out of the tour. The answers in order are (a) enough so that like a lot of people we've got a mortgage, a 20-year-old three-bedroom home [in Richmond] that's a 40-minute commute to work, and a 16-foot boat that's inefficient in two-foot seas, and (b) zero."

    Hansen recalled that his brother told him jokingly once that he should have taken 10 per cent of the tour's gross "because many people in my paper mill figured you did anyway."

    Margaret Birrell, executive director of the B.C. Coalition of People with Disabilities, has been a sharp critic of the B.C. Liberal government, saying that Gordon Campbell's policies have hurt the disabled. Unlike Birrell, Hansen steers clear of political controversy, but she doesn't fault him for that.

    "I think we all play different roles," said Birrell. "There are many disability-specific groups that see their role as raising money for research and they don't get involved in advocacy."

    Birrell said Hansen has given spinal cord research a profile it previously lacked.

    "He has access to prime ministers and cabinet ministers and premiers because he has such a high profile and determined personality."

    Hansen has worked with UBC since the late '80s when he was hired as a consultant on disability issues. He set up the Disability Resource Centre at UBC. His focus during the early '90s was on issues surrounding access and rehabilitation.

    In the mid-'90s, people connected to the Man In Motion Foundation decided to focus more on spinal cord research. The Rick Hansen Institute was formed to spearhead the effort. The culmination of the shift towards research was the ICORD Centre.

    "The idea was [to] create this consolidated research centre. It came out of a series of meetings and took a long time. It was like herding cats," says Hansen, who did much of the herding and the fund-raising. But he says he doesn't regard himself as a fund raiser.

    "A fund raiser is someone who just raises money. That's only a small part of what I do. I encourage people to help me realize dreams."

    Hansen said he wants the cure, but not necessarily for himself.

    "I don't want people to think that I'm supporting spinal cord research so that I can walk again. I made my peace a long time ago and I wouldn't trade my life for the use of my legs.

    "It's not about walking. It took me some time to figure that out but I'm there. I feel like I'm one of the luckiest guys on the planet."

    - - -

    HERE TO HELP

    Rick Hansen is a founding board member of the Rick Hansen Man In Motion Foundation. Among the many programs and agencies that benefit from support and partnership with the Man In Motion Foundation are:

    - The new annual Rick Hansen Wheels In Motion fund-raising event to raise awareness and funds to improve the quality of life of people with spinal cord injury

    - The leadership and development of Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Network, made possible by the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Leadership Fund, a $15 million grant over seven years from the federal government, as of 2003

    - The Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation, which will receive a renewed $25 million commitment over the next five years from the government of Ontario, as of 2003

    - The Canadian Neurotrauma Research Program, which helps fund spinal cord research with Canadian Institutes for Health Research

    - The B.C. Neurotrauma Fund, $2 million annually in support of spinal cord and brain injury from a portion of proceeds from a surcharge on traffic fines in B.C.

    - The Disability Resource Centre at the University of B.C., dedicated to enabling students of all abilities to acquire education

    - The Life Skills Program providing curriculum-based resources for schools across Canada

    - The National Fellow Program at UBC

    - The Rick Hansen School Program, motivating youth to make a difference

    Hansen is also the president and CEO of the Rick Hansen Institute, which is funded with the Man In Motion Foundation and the University of B.C. The Institute has been instrumental in creating and funding:

    - The $46-million ICORD (International Collaboration for Repair Discoveries) at VGH, which includes five research chairs

    - The International Campaign to Cure Spinal Cord Injury Paralysis (ICCP), an alliance of international agencies involved in spinal cord research, including the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation

    Ran with fact box "Here to help", which has been appended to the end of the story.

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  8. #8
    Member chris B.'s Avatar
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    RE: RICK HANSEN WHEELS IN MOTION,TRYING TO POST

    Originally posted by chris B.:

    HOPEFULLY THE RICK HANSEN WHEEL,RUN,BIKE EVENT THIS SAT.JUNE 14 WILL RAISE AWARENESS ACROSS THIS COUNTRY, AND GET THE WHOLE SPINAL CORD INJURY ISSUE IN EVERYBODY'S 'FACE'. THEN SOME PRESSURE WILL START TO HAVE MORE OF AN IMPACT ON RESEARCH AND FUNDING FOR TREATMENTS THAT ARE STARTING TO BE AVAILABLE. THIS EVENT WILL BECOME AN ANNUAL THING, SO LET'S RAISE LOTS AND LOTS OF MONEY, AND GET THE 'WHEELS IN MOTION'. MY SON, BRIAN IS 19 YRS.WITH T5 INJURY, AND HE IS A PARTICIPANT, ALONG WITH MYSELF,ANOTHER SON, MY SISTER,2 NIECES, AND WE ARE ALL TAKING PLEDGES. LET'S JUST SEE HOW MUCH OF A DIFFERENCE ONE DAY A YEAR CAN MAKE IN RAISING MONEY. WE'RE ON A ROLL. HOPE IT DOESN'T RAIN.
    CHRIS B.

    [This message was edited by chris B. on 06-11-03 at 10:13 AM.]

    [This message was edited by chris B. on 06-12-03 at 09:04 PM.]

  9. #9
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Rick Hansen; unstoppable

    Rick Hansen; unstoppable


    By WALLACE IMMEN
    From Saturday's Globe and Mail

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    Rick Hansen has developed an incredibly firm grip and massive shoulders. But what you have to admire most is his focus.

    Sixteen years after Canada's most famous paraplegic circled the world in his wheelchair, Mr. Hansen has his eyes set on a goal of improving the quality of life for everyone with spinal cord injuries.

    His new mission is to get people across Canada on wheels today to raise pledge money for each kilometre travelled. Half the proceeds will go toward research, while the rest will stay in the communities to support projects.

    The theme of the event is to "get on a roll," whether it is by bike, skateboard, scooter, in-line skates and people can walk or run if they prefer.

    Rolling off a plane on a visit to Toronto yesterday, Mr. Hansen said he's never been more excited by the prospects for reducing the damage of spinal injuries and helping people with injuries be more productive.

    There has been an "unbelievable evolution" in medical treatments in the aftermath of a spinal injury, Mr. Hansen said. There are now specialilzed spinal-cord treatment units and steroid drugs that reduce swelling to limit damage to nerves.

    With the recent advances in treatments, 70 per cent of people who experience spinal cord injuries now show some signs of recovery such as sensation, movement or even full function. Just a decade ago, the improvement rate was 30 per cent.

    Recent research has also discovered damaged spinal connections can regrow and that nerve pathways to the brain can be restimulated. But Mr. Hansen said the research is still in early stages and not being co-ordinated toward treatments.

    Part of his goal with the Wheels in Motion event is to raise $1-million a year which he hopes will "break the research jam and get findings out into clinical trials," he said.

    This week, the federal government also made a commitment of $15-million over the next seven years to create a spinal cord information network named after Mr. Hansen to link the 37,000 people in Canada with spinal cord injuries. Interactive programs will be designed to provide updated information on treatments and mobility equipment.

    The man whose 40,000 kilometre "Man in Motion" trip around the world inspired thousands said he is continually inspired himself by the dedication of others. Many of people with spinal cord injuries have organized events across the country with the help of the national sponsor, Scotiabank.

    Wheels in Motion events are happening this morning in more than 100 communities across the country, including five events in the Toronto area. Information on locations is on the Web site http://www.rickhansen.com.

    "Before we started our event a lot of people said volunteerism in Canada is really dying, but boy, it's amazing," Mr. Hansen said.

    In many communities, people with spinal cord injuries have become ambassadors to promote the events. But even people who have not known anyone with a spinal injury have volunteered their time, he said.

    After starting a wheels event at Toronto's Ontario Place at 9 a.m., Mr. Hansen will fly to his hometown of Vancouver where he will inaugurate an event at the Richmond Chinese Community Association at 2:30 p.m.

    "It's like wheeling around the world again," Mr. Hansen said of the new campaign. "You look up in the middle of it and say, whoa, I've come a long way. But then you realize there's still a long way to go."

    http://www.globeandmail.com/servlet/...tory/National/

  10. #10
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Canada rocked as wheels rolled

    Canada rocked as wheels rolled

    Canada's Man In Motion Inspired by Nation's Generosity

    VANCOUVER, June 25 /CNW/ - Presented by Scotiabank, the first annual Rick
    Hansen Wheels In Motion launched on June 14th rocked the country with 200
    related events, which took place in every province and territory in Canada.
    Approximately 10,000 participants wheeled to raise funds and awareness to
    improve the quality of life of people with spinal cord injury (SCI), and for
    research, ultimately leading to cure.
    Rick Hansen, President and CEO of the Rick Hansen Man In Motion
    Foundation, announced today that preliminary results indicate over half a
    million dollars has been raised with donations and pledges still rolling in.
    "We're thrilled with the results of our first ever Wheels In Motion,"
    said Hansen. "The stories I've heard about the impact this event had on people
    with SCI are truly inspiring. I'm overwhelmed by the enthusiastic efforts of
    hundreds of volunteers who helped make this vision a reality. It takes a great
    team to achieve big dreams."
    Half the net proceeds of Rick Hansen Wheels In Motion events will be
    applied to the community in which the funds are raised for a priority project
    that improves the quality of life of people with spinal cord injury. The
    remainder will be directed to research initiatives nationally identified by
    the SCI Translational Research Network.
    "The success of the first ever Rick Hansen Wheels In Motion demonstrates
    how many Canadians remain truly inspired by Rick's outstanding courage and his
    landmark achievements," said Bob Chisholm, Vice-Chairman Scotiabank and
    President and CEO Domestic Banking and Wealth Management. "As inaugural
    Presenting Partner, Scotiabank and its employees were tremendously proud to be
    involved in this initiative that will make an important contribution to
    research and support programs benefiting people living with spinal cord
    injury."
    "We have built a strong foundation and look forward to next year,"
    concluded Hansen. "All of us working together - people with spinal cord
    injury, event leaders and volunteers, service organizations and researchers,
    government and all our corporate partners - in a time of unprecedented
    scientific possibility and social awareness - means that we truly can see
    dreams come true."

    Rick Hansen Wheels In Motion is the signature event of the Rick Hansen
    Man In Motion Foundation, designed to raise awareness and funds to improve the
    quality of life of people with spinal cord injury. The Rick Hansen Man In
    Motion Foundation's mission is to accelerate improvements to the quality of
    life of people with spinal cord injury. Ten million Canadians have some
    connection to people with SCI.

    Scotiabank is committed to supporting the communities in which its
    employees and customers live and work, both in Canada and abroad. Recognized
    as a leader among Canadian corporations for its charitable donations and
    philanthropic activities, in 2002 the Bank provided more than $25 million in
    sponsorships and donations to a variety of projects and initiatives, primarily
    in the areas of healthcare, education and social services. Scotiabank is on
    the World Wide Web at www.scotiabank.com. Final results will be posted on www.rickhansen.com.
    -30-

    For further information: Media contacts: Rick Hansen Wheels In Motion:
    Lorraine Wilson, (604) 709-6346; Rick Hansen Man In Motion Foundation: Sarah
    Sugiyama, (604) 709-6329; Scotiabank Public Affairs: Neil Trotter, Scotiabank
    Public Affairs, (416) 866-3708
    RICK HANSEN MAN IN MOTION FOUNDATION has 43 releases in this database.

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