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Thread: Asteroid Flies Past Earth

  1. #1

    Cool Asteroid Flies Past Earth

    An asteroid the size of a 10-story building flew past Earth today about twice the distance as the highest Earth-orbiting satellites.

    The space rock was about 115 feet (35 meters) wide, perhaps a bit larger than one thought to have created a colossal explosion in the air above Siberia in 1908 that flattened 500,000 acres (2,000 square kilometers) of forest.

    Asteroid 2009 DD45 was closest to Earth today at about 8:40 a.m. ET (1340 UT). It was some 44,740 miles (72,000 km) away. That's twice the height of a geostationary communications satellite.

    Astronomers had known the asteroid was coming and said there was no risk of collision. Other asteroids have been known to pass by closer to our planet. And, of course, sometimes the slam into us. Car-sized objects streak into our atmosphere several times a year. Most burn up in the atmosphere or land in the ocean (the planet is two-thirds water).

    Asteroids as big as the 1908 Tunguska object that devastated the Siberian forest might strike Earth as often as once every two centuries, scientists speculate. As space rocks enter Earth's atmosphere, smaller ones can break apart or explode before hitting the surface. If one were to strike or explode above a city, the results would be locally devastating.
    Han: "We are all ready to win, just as we are born knowing only life. It is defeat that you must learn to prepare for"

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by jhope View Post
    An asteroid the size of a 10-story building flew past Earth today about twice the distance as the highest Earth-orbiting satellites.

    The space rock was about 115 feet (35 meters) wide, perhaps a bit larger than one thought to have created a colossal explosion in the air above Siberia in 1908 that flattened 500,000 acres (2,000 square kilometers) of forest.

    Asteroid 2009 DD45 was closest to Earth today at about 8:40 a.m. ET (1340 UT). It was some 44,740 miles (72,000 km) away. That's twice the height of a geostationary communications satellite.

    Astronomers had known the asteroid was coming and said there was no risk of collision. Other asteroids have been known to pass by closer to our planet. And, of course, sometimes the slam into us. Car-sized objects streak into our atmosphere several times a year. Most burn up in the atmosphere or land in the ocean (the planet is two-thirds water).

    Asteroids as big as the 1908 Tunguska object that devastated the Siberian forest might strike Earth as often as once every two centuries, scientists speculate. As space rocks enter Earth's atmosphere, smaller ones can break apart or explode before hitting the surface. If one were to strike or explode above a city, the results would be locally devastating.
    Well, there is something to be said about being lucky and unlucky. At NYU where I worked for 20 years, the department of neurosurgery had a motto that it gave on a plaque to all its graduating neurosurgery residents: It's better to be lucky than good. While it is meant to tell the neurosurgeons that they should not be too cocky and sure of themselves and that people do get unlucky, it reminds us that we should thank whoever is responsible for asteroid missing us by only a couple of miles. A hit by a big asteroid would change life as we know it.

    Wise.

  3. #3
    Senior Member fishin'guy's Avatar
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    Dr wise, about14-15 yrs ago I had a steroid injection in my back. This was before they started taking x-rays as they went in.This was about my third or fourth one of these, and as sitting on the edge of the gurney, leaning forward, I heard the young Dr and the nurse mumbling to each other, and I could feel some "proding" going on and all of a sudden, I felt a bit of a "flush" and the Dr says to my wife and i, "Wow, sometimes it's better to be lucky, than good", I wanted to feint, I was stressed enuf after already having had these before. Just thought I'd let you know, even anethesiologists, use that line.

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