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Thread: Eating for the planet.

  1. #11
    Moderator jody's Avatar
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    true about the brain thing. we are not the only hominid's in the history of the world. their was once a plant eating higher primate. they walked upright, and wove plant fibers into clothes, they were gatherers, and in fact had crudely cultivated natural territory where they used nuts, roots, berries and friuts, tubers, grass seeds, and honey. they stored food for winter. they did not make it through the last Ice age. starved and were hunted by the more agresive meat eaters.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by IanTPoulter View Post
    Our brains are what they are because of animal protein.

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    Ian, looks like a college student paper. If it's doctoral material I'll be surprised. Goggling Jay Thornley brings up only your PDF file and his single reference for the paper at the bottom of the page is:

    Reference

    Haviland W. A. et al. 2005Cultural Anthropology: The Human Challenge 11th Edition.
    So he read a paper or book and based his position of the necessity of human carnivorism on it.

    Aim higher.

    We need to agree on the value of reevaluating how/what we eat and the desirability of making/leaving smaller carbon footprints and overall global responsibility. If we either won't engage or rationalize where we stand in regard to the harmony of the complex web of earth's ecosystem then we're not behaving responsibly or admirably.

    A carbon footprint is “the total set of GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions caused directly and indirectly by an individual, organization, event or...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_footprint
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  3. #13
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    Ian, I am not a vegan, mostly because I lack the discipline to pull it off. Give up ice cream? No way! But the very article you quoted mentions a source of animal protein (the egg) where nothing has to die to enter the food chain. The eggs are unfertilized. There is also protein to be found in things like cheese, ice cream, and other products that do not require the killing of the animal. I am not suggesting that everyone becomes a vegetarian, as that is an individual choice, but one can live with health (and a lower chance of coronary artery disease) when one lives a vegetarian lifestyle.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Juke_spin View Post
    Ian, looks like a college student paper. If it's doctoral material I'll be surprised. Goggling Jay Thornley brings up only your PDF file and his single reference for the paper at the bottom of the page is:

    So he read a paper or book and based his position of the necessity of human carnivorism on it.

    Aim higher.

    We need to agree on the value of reevaluating how/what we eat and the desirability of making/leaving smaller carbon footprints and overall global responsibility. If we either won't engage or rationalize where we stand in regard to the harmony of the complex web of earth's ecosystem then we're not behaving responsibly or admirably.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_footprint
    S far as I am aware the animal protein brain evolution theory is broadly accepted by athropologists so I just grabbed the first link I could find that illustrated it, I have to come back to this thread tomorrow unfiortunately. I will try and back my views up a bit more comprehensively.

  5. #15
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    Historically and metabolically/biologically we are and always have been omnivores. Who amongst you in the eat-meat category would like to live the rest of your life eating only animal protein?
    Last edited by Juke_spin; 02-04-2009 at 05:13 AM.

  6. #16
    Moderator jody's Avatar
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    I enjoyed having a few hens, and growing all my own herbs, tomatoes, cukes, onions, carots, and radishes. my tiny old english hens. were very happy to give me their eggs. I unwound after work in the tiny backyard garden with coop built by me. dried my own hergs for winter, and froze most of the vegies. Id love to do it again. one thing I sometimes get enviouse of is peoples wasted yards.

  7. #17
    Moderator jody's Avatar
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    crap, I misspelled herbs.

  8. #18
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    Hunter-Gatherers is what our most recent pre-civilization ancestors were and when, as was often the case, the men came home from hunting with little or no meat, they were sated and pleased most often by what the foraging women had scrounged and cooked for them. And the historical place/space they occupied as just such basic, rudimentary footprinters was many times the duration of the one we live in. Without knowledge of their complex relationship with the biosphere they lived and ate in ways that impacted it hardly at all. Their carbon footprint was about nil; their numbers could have been increased by orders of magnitude and the impact and footprint wouldn't have been much greater than it was.

    If we each of us aimed at eating to emulate those ancestors even at a slow increasing approximation the world's overall health would benefit in ways that could pleasantly stagger the imagination.

    I'm remembered once again to that pithsightful quote of J..S. Haldane's: "The world will not perish for want wonders but for want of wonder."

    You've got to know meat-focused diets are wrong. Don't you wonder as I do if you/we can do better?

    Thirty years ago my solo nod to nutrition was making chin-music about it. Today I've made a major break with that past and am eating such weird foods that it would take a volcanic island Oriental to share a meal with me. But I'm not either vegan or vegetarian. Yet! A true ethereal green space is what I want - though I might well have become just a memory without getting there. I value the path and the challenge though, and all that they've led me to and let me see.

    What have you seen where this is concerned and will you show it to the the community?

    Quote Originally Posted by jody View Post
    crap, I misspelled herbs.
    I didn't notice before - but that's what the Edit button (the Preview one as well) is for. Can't you still do a lot of those things?
    Last edited by Juke_spin; 02-05-2009 at 02:50 AM.

  9. #19
    Juke, you didn't answer my question but I'm assuming from subsequent posts that you're not advocating the whole world goes veggie?
    C5/6 incomplete

    "I assume you all have guns and crack....."

  10. #20
    Senior Member BigK's Avatar
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    Stop Global Whining!

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