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Thread: Water transport method

  1. #21
    I moved a number of posts that are not relevant to this topic to http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthread.php?t=114572

    Wise.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Tweetybird's Avatar
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    That looks like a wonderful device. For about a year (A little more), I have been living without running water as my well went dry. I finally have gotten funding to drill a new one, but we are waiting for the cold winter and snow to pass so we can drill the new well. I would have loved ot have had one of these, especially this summer as I could have pulled it behind my power chair. I wish I had known about it as I would have bought one. I lugged gallon jugs tied all over my chair to take down to the well at the local park. I look like a rolling jug porkupine, with jugs hanging and sticking out in all directions. It is a very tiring, wet, and time consuming thing to gather water this way, so I can identify with the people in these third word countries.]

    Now what I am doing is having friends and PCA's bring water to my house in these same gallon jugs.
    Disability is not a medical problem with social issues, but rather a social problem with medical issues.
    Franklin D. Rosevelt

  3. #23
    I have a story about water and wells.
    My grandfather built a house on a hillside, out an hour's or so drive from the nearest town. He dug a well just uphill from the house. There was a windlass that dropped a long, narrow bucket down into the well. Over the years, with shovel and wheelbarrow, he dug the hillside back and built a garage, with the main part down at house level. The well casing extended up through the ground floor level, up to the second floor, where the windlass remained. You got there by climbing some steps in the hillside next to the garage. For roughly 30 years, until around 1960, he or grandma would climb those steps, let the bucket down, crank it back up, fill a couple of buckets with water, and carry them down the steps to the house. I remember lifting that old bucket, heavy when filled. Around 1960 grandpa found a big, used, cast-iron pump, and replaced the bucket and windlass. But he mounted it - yes - up on the second floor of that garage! To the end of his life he refused to cut the well casing and remount the well at the now-ground level. After he died, Dad put the pump down where common sense would place it. Grandma filled her daily bucket and carried it over to the house until she was in her mid 90's, when she left the house and moved in with my folks. Subsequently, renters in the house put in an electric pump and a gravity feed system, but it only fills the tank when they're running the generator - still no electricity out there.
    - Richard

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by rfbdorf View Post
    I have a story about water and wells.
    My grandfather built a house on a hillside, out an hour's or so drive from the nearest town. He dug a well just uphill from the house. There was a windlass that dropped a long, narrow bucket down into the well. Over the years, with shovel and wheelbarrow, he dug the hillside back and built a garage, with the main part down at house level. The well casing extended up through the ground floor level, up to the second floor, where the windlass remained. You got there by climbing some steps in the hillside next to the garage. For roughly 30 years, until around 1960, he or grandma would climb those steps, let the bucket down, crank it back up, fill a couple of buckets with water, and carry them down the steps to the house. I remember lifting that old bucket, heavy when filled. Around 1960 grandpa found a big, used, cast-iron pump, and replaced the bucket and windlass. But he mounted it - yes - up on the second floor of that garage! To the end of his life he refused to cut the well casing and remount the well at the now-ground level. After he died, Dad put the pump down where common sense would place it. Grandma filled her daily bucket and carried it over to the house until she was in her mid 90's, when she left the house and moved in with my folks. Subsequently, renters in the house put in an electric pump and a gravity feed system, but it only fills the tank when they're running the generator - still no electricity out there.
    - Richard
    I love stories like this. What a challenge to live without electricity huh?

    We take too much for granted here in the US. Too bad some organization couldnt mass produce these and distribute them like "operation Christmas Child" distributes presents at Christmas.

    Sjean, its funny mine used to complain about toting water too when camping. My goodness, we really have nothing to complain about do we???
    T12-L2; Burst fracture L1: Incomplete walking with AFO's and cane since 1989

    My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am. ~Author Unknown

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Tweetybird View Post
    That looks like a wonderful device. For about a year (A little more), I have been living without running water as my well went dry. I finally have gotten funding to drill a new one, but we are waiting for the cold winter and snow to pass so we can drill the new well. I would have loved ot have had one of these, especially this summer as I could have pulled it behind my power chair. I wish I had known about it as I would have bought one. I lugged gallon jugs tied all over my chair to take down to the well at the local park. I look like a rolling jug porkupine, with jugs hanging and sticking out in all directions. It is a very tiring, wet, and time consuming thing to gather water this way, so I can identify with the people in these third word countries.]

    Now what I am doing is having friends and PCA's bring water to my house in these same gallon jugs.
    Yikes, what are you doing living in a house without running water? As I read your post, I was imagining a rope tow device that with a small electric pump energized by a solar panel, that would pull these rolling wheels to your house and automatically stack them and return the empty ones back to wherever you fill the water, even a mile away.

    Wise.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by rfbdorf View Post
    I have a story about water and wells.
    My grandfather built a house on a hillside, out an hour's or so drive from the nearest town. He dug a well just uphill from the house. There was a windlass that dropped a long, narrow bucket down into the well. Over the years, with shovel and wheelbarrow, he dug the hillside back and built a garage, with the main part down at house level. The well casing extended up through the ground floor level, up to the second floor, where the windlass remained. You got there by climbing some steps in the hillside next to the garage. For roughly 30 years, until around 1960, he or grandma would climb those steps, let the bucket down, crank it back up, fill a couple of buckets with water, and carry them down the steps to the house. I remember lifting that old bucket, heavy when filled. Around 1960 grandpa found a big, used, cast-iron pump, and replaced the bucket and windlass. But he mounted it - yes - up on the second floor of that garage! To the end of his life he refused to cut the well casing and remount the well at the now-ground level. After he died, Dad put the pump down where common sense would place it. Grandma filled her daily bucket and carried it over to the house until she was in her mid 90's, when she left the house and moved in with my folks. Subsequently, renters in the house put in an electric pump and a gravity feed system, but it only fills the tank when they're running the generator - still no electricity out there.
    - Richard
    richard, what a wonderful story. While I was in Japan recently, I marveled at the natural fountains that the Japanese would build into their farmhouses, finding hotsprings or other water sources that are up on a hill and then running pipes down to the farm so that the water pressure would create a fountain. A lot of these solutions, i.e. those using gravity or natural hotsprings, were ingenious and energy-conservative. My dream is to build an entirely energy self-sufficient house one day.

    Wise.

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