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Thread: Water transport method

  1. #11
    Thanks Dr Young
    But I am still curious about the water jugs. Where is this?
    If you can't handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don't deserve me at my best.


    Sometimes it is easier to widen doors than it is to open minds.

  2. #12
    The Q drum was featured in an exhibit called "Design for the other 90%" at the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum. There are some other great designs shown on their pages. Here is the manufacturer's website. They say it's used in about a dozen countries. Simple but wonderful ideas like this can make an astounding difference to people in need. As they say, "The people that need them can't afford them & must rely on people who can afford them but don't need them"
    - Richard

    addendum: Here is another, very similar ides: the Hippo Water Roller
    Last edited by rfbdorf; 02-01-2009 at 01:23 PM. Reason: addendum

  3. #13
    Senior Member JimD's Avatar
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    Brilliant solution to a common problem. Elegant.

  4. #14
    Ahhh thanks. I was googling all kinds of stuff. Donut shaped water jug actually gets you some strange results.
    If you can't handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don't deserve me at my best.


    Sometimes it is easier to widen doors than it is to open minds.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by rfbdorf View Post
    The Q drum was featured in an exhibit called "Design for the other 90%" at the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum. There are some other great designs shown on their pages. Here is the manufacturer's website. They say it's used in about a dozen countries. Simple but wonderful ideas like this can make an astounding difference to people in need. As they say, "The people that need them can't afford them & must rely on people who can afford them but don't need them"
    - Richard

    addendum: Here is another, very similar ides: the Hippo Water Roller
    Richard,

    Thank you so much. I am sorry that I did not put in the links for the device, the designers, and the source. Several groups have been funding the programs that provide these devices. For example,
    http://www.qdrum.co.za/
    2008 - Q Drum was recently involved in supplying drums to Somebody Cares, an organisation working with Madonna's charity: Raising Malawi. The drums were given to a group of Malawian children.
    It is important that these devices be tested in real environments and be shown to be efficient and workable. So, let me put my scientist's hat on and evaluate the device. Several thoughts immediately came to mind:
    Weight. 50 liters of water is quite a lot of weight for children to pull, even when it is rolling. It certainly does seem to work on flat ground, even over grass, as the following video shows:

    Cost. Buck_Nastier has an interesting point, that this needs a custom mold and that this must be more costly to make than a wagon with wheels. In fact, the high cost was one of the reasons why the device did not make it even though it was introduced in 1992
    http://www.changemakers.net/node/6683
    Delivery Model: How do you implement your innovation and apply it to the challenge/problem you are addressing? - Fifteen years ago when we started with the project we soon realised that high manufacturing and transport costs put it out of reach for most people – those who need it cannot afford it … We then realised that funding by international donors, non-governmental organizations and private corporations is essential for sustainability but these organisations were then not as sensitive to the needs of ‘those who cannot afford it’. Sales didn’t materialise and having exhausted our resources, we decided to abandon the project.
    Versatility. The hole in the middle facilitates the stacking of the Q-drums thus allowing it to be stored as well as used for transportation, something that the hippo drum (http://www.hipporoller.org/) does not do as well. The hippo drum also is bigger (75 liters) and may require an adult to manuever whereas the rope design of the Q drum allows two kids to pull the device up a small hill.
    Durable. The Q-drum is durable with few breakable parts. There is only the rope and the drum. The rope can be replaced. The drum is designed for substantial abuse. The polyethylene is safe for water. The drum has been tested for a 3 meter drop test. It has been extensively used in Angola and South Africa with no breakdowns.

    Buck, you were right that these drums were expensive to make and the local people could not afford it. However, I was not able to find the actual cost of the device. I suspect that if it is US$20, the people would not be able to afford it. In any case, the costs had to be covered by philanthrophic institutions. On the other hand, the device is really superior to all over devices in that it is simpler, hardier, and can serve as both a transporter as well as a storage device.

    Wise.
    Last edited by Wise Young; 02-02-2009 at 03:29 PM.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Timaru's Avatar
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    A sad reflection on the modern world that this technology, potentially life saving when used in the third world for water transportation, is abandoned because of cost and yet is alive and kicking in the first world where it is used to roll cricket pitches and bowling greens.



  7. #17
    The price is ZAR450 (South African Rand), decreasing to ZAR410 if you buy 500. At roughly ZAR10=US$1, that's $45. Add shipping to that.
    As Q Drum say on their website (click the "pricing" tab), "Rotational moulding is a fairly lengthy and therefore expensive manufacturing process." Someone figures out how to make something like it more cheaply, they'd be helping a lot of people.
    - Richard

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    Buck, you were right that these drums were expensive to make and the local people could not afford it. However, I was not able to find the actual cost of the device. I suspect that if it is US$20, the people would not be able to afford it. In any case, the costs had to be covered by philanthrophic institutions. On the other hand, the device is really superior to all over devices in that it is simpler, hardier, and can serve as both a transporter as well as a storage device.
    They look like they are made out of the same material as mooring
    buoys. Mooring buoys that are as large as that jug usually cost
    around $60 American.


  9. #19

  10. #20
    Senior Member
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    The free wheelchair mission
    provides inexpensive wheelchairs to people w/ nothing. I wonder if something in this vein would be effective with these water wheels?
    T7-8 since Feb 2005

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