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Thread: $5 Million Cash Gift to the University of Miami School of Medicine To Help Find a Cure for Paralysis and Enhance Orthopaedics Research

  1. #1

    $5 Million Cash Gift to the University of Miami School of Medicine To Help Find a Cure for Paralysis and Enhance Orthopaedics Research

    $5 Million Cash Gift to the University of Miami School of Medicine To Help Find a Cure for Paralysis and Enhance Orthopaedics Research


    Christine Lynn, of Boca Raton, Florida, Makes Donation Dedicated to Spinal Cord Injury Research at The Miami Project and the Department of Orthopaedics

    MIAMI, Jan. 29 /PRNewswire/ -- The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis and the Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Miami School of Medicine today received a $5 million cash gift from longtime supporter and South Florida philanthropist Christine Lynn at a ceremony at the University of Miami School of Medicine. The $5 million gift will go to enhance regeneration research programs at The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis and pelvic trauma research in the Department of Orthopaedics.

    As a result of Christine Lynn's generosity, $2.5 million will be allocated for the Christine E. Lynn distinguished chair in honor of Barth A. Green, M.D. for The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis and $2.5 million for the Christine E. Lynn Distinguished Chair in Orthopaedic Trauma in honor of Gregory Zych, M.D. These funds will support the ongoing critical regeneration research efforts at The Miami Project -- promising research into making axons re-grow in the injured or damaged area of the spinal cord -- and Dr. Zych's pelvic trauma research efforts to make surgery safer and more efficient.

    Since 1995, Christine Lynn and her late husband, E.M. Lynn, have been supporters of The University of Miami's Miami Project. This gift, which continues their tradition of generosity toward the crusade to cure those suffering from spinal cord injury, brings their total giving to the University of Miami to more than $5.6 million.

    "I have been very impressed with the dedication offered by Dr. Green and all of the staff of The Miami Project to allow those with spinal cord injury to enjoy a much better quality of life as well as providing hope that a cure for paralysis will soon be found," said Christine Lynn.

    Of the $2.5 million gift to The Miami Project, Dr. Barth Green said, "We are very thankful for the guidance, vision and financial support offered by Christine Lynn. Her commitment to The Miami Project inspires us all as we continue on our quest for a paralysis cure. We have several promising leads, and new research discoveries every day that will one day lead to a cure. A cure for paralysis is not a question of 'if,' but a matter of 'when.'"

    Barth A. Green, M.D. is President and Co-Founder of The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Miami and Chief of Neurological Services at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center.

    The other $2.5 million of the gift will be used to fund the Christine E. Lynn Distinguished Chair in Orthopaedic Trauma, which will be filled by Dr. Gregory Zych, Associate Professor of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation at the University of Miami School of Medicine. The gift will be put toward research and further development of computer-guided navigation for surgical repair of pelvic fractures among other important projects. Currently, surgical repair of pelvic fractures requires large surgical approaches with great exposure and the potential for increased infection. Dr. Zych has been developing techniques that permit minimal surgical dissection with incisions that can be covered with a band-aid.

    Present at today's announcement were University of Miami President Donna E. Shalala; Dr. John G. Clarkson, senior vice president for medical affairs and dean of the School of Medicine; Dr. Barth Green; Dr. Gregory Zych; Marc and Nick Buoniconti; Dr. W. Dalton Dietrich, scientific director of The Miami Project; and Dr. Mary Bartlett Bunge, whose regeneration research will be funded by the gift.

    "The commitment of our dear friend Christine Lynn to the University of Miami School of Medicine is providing critical support to our research efforts," Shalala said. "We are enormously grateful for her interest in The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, which sets the standard for spinal cord research worldwide."

    The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis

    Founded in 1985 through the vision and efforts of Dr. Barth Green and following the injury of football legend Nick Buoniconti's son Marc, the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, located at the University of Miami School of Medicine, is the world's largest, most comprehensive research center dedicated to finding more effective treatments and, ultimately, a cure for paralysis that results from spinal cord injury. The Miami Project basic science and clinical research programs address a broad scope of topics including pathophysiology, neuroprotection, regeneration and repair, rehabilitation and quality of life. For more information or to make a contribution to the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, please visit http://www.themiamiproject.org or call 1 800 STAND UP.

    Department of Orthopaedics

    Dr. Gregory Zych has practiced orthopaedic surgery at the University of Miami School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery for the past 22 years and has a special interest in pelvic trauma and utilization of computer technology in the operating room. Dr. Zych is Chief of Orthopaedic Trauma and Associate Chairman for Clinical Affairs for the Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation.

    Dr. Zych has had extensive experience in the treatment of all types of pelvic trauma and is trying to investigate various forms of acute management in an effort to lower the death rate and improve patient function after such devastating injury. The gift from Christine Lynn will continue this important work.

    SOURCE The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis

    CO: Miami Project to Cure Paralysis; University of Miami School of Medicine

  2. #2

    Research on paralysis gets a financial boost

    Posted on Thu, Jan. 30, 2003
    Research on paralysis gets a financial boost
    Philanthropist backs work of Miami Project
    BY CONNIE PRATER
    cprater@herald.com

    It might not happen in her lifetime, but 25-year-old Sabrina Cohen of Miami Beach is hoping the $2.5 million donated Wednesday for the newest wave of research in curing paralysis will eventually help the paralyzed walk again.

    ''You live with so much hope that one day something will come out soon,'' said Cohen, a quadriplegic who was left wheelchair-bound after a 1992 drag-racing accident on Alton Road.

    Cohen is putting her hopes on research conducted by doctors at the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis at the University of Miami. Thanks to a $2.5 million donation announced Wednesday by Boca Raton philanthropist Christine Lynn, the most promising research toward a cure can continue.

    The new hope lies not in the hours of physical therapy Cohen undergoes, but in the lab work under way at UM, headed by lead researcher Dr. Mary Bunge.

    Scientists are experimenting with ways to regrow damaged spinal-cord nerves, transplant fetal or adult stem cells into damaged nerve cells, or inject proteins into such cells to coax them to grow again. They are also looking at drugs to treat tissue damaged near the spine.

    Researchers say a combination of these techniques could lead to a cure, although researchers say a cure still could be decades away.

    ''There's a lot of directions to go,'' said Dr. W. Dalton Dietrich, scientific director of the Miami Project.

    Progress on stem-cell research -- which is not widely supported by the Bush administration for fear that it could lead to cloning or abortions to harvest stem cells -- is still far off, Dietrich said. ''We don't know how to control these cells,'' Dietrich said. ``But given funding and time, we'll figure these things out.''

    Lynn's donation will supplement the Miami Project's $15 million annual budget.
    ''Hopefully, I'll be alive to see that we find a cure for spinal-cord injury,'' she said.

    In addition, Lynn gave $2.5 million to fund research on pelvic trauma surgery by Dr. Gregory Zych at the UM School of Medicine's Department of Orthopaedics.
    Zych and Dr. Barth Green, director of the Miami Project, treated Lynn's late husband, Eugene, after he injured his spine in a fall.

    http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald...al/5061902.htm

  3. #3
    That is one hell of a thoughtfull lady.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Leo's Avatar
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    Hi Chasb, Your right about her heart. But from what I've heard about MP, first thing I thought of was what Spain, Wise and other could do with that much $. Lets see them prove us wrong. eh

  5. #5
    I often wonder about the $$$ MP gets from various sources never seem to have any accountability attached? Clinical trials few and far between?

    And if so, do they know something that we don't because a lot of people seem to think that they're on the cutting edge?

    Perish the thought. I hope not.

  6. #6
    Senior Member mk99's Avatar
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    It never ceases to amaze me how much money can be raised by an organization that will do everything in their power to maintain and milk paralysis as long as possible.

    $5 million and it makes NO difference whatsoever. NOTHING. It's disgusting. With "friends" like Miami Project, the SCI community doesn't need any enemies that's for sure.

    How do they manage to pull this shit off for so long?

    While human trials with OEGs are giving results TODAY, Miami has done one study that showed Schwann cells alone are better than OEG. What a fucking joke they are. Too bad the joke is on us and the stupid donors.

    When I get cured the first thing I will do is publicly challenge them to prove why they exist.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Leo's Avatar
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    There's got to be someone here who will attempt to defend MP? I'm a newbie to cure activism give me some thing to support your existence and I'm thinking what's in the pipeline. If not your saying we don't exist.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Jeff's Avatar
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    I have a suspicious feeling that MP will be more relevant than we can imagine.

    Of course, we'll never know what would have happened if those millions would have gone elsewhere.

    One thing to remember is that a big part of curing SCI is fundraising. Some organizations that might excel at research could actually be lousy at fundraising. I don't think we should criticize MP for being good at fundraising.

    MP has contributed toward the cure in many, many ways. I don't think we've heard the last of them.

    ~See you at the SCIWire-used-to-be-paralyzed Reunion ~

  9. #9
    Senior Member mk99's Avatar
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    Jeff please tell me ONE thing that MP has to show for the millions and millions that they've gotten.

    They can't get OEGs to work and Schwann cells were discovered in 1903. In fact Richard Bunge was working with Schwann cells for years BEFORE Miami Project came to be.

    They have criticized any human trials going on as "premature" and besides Schwann cells they have nothing. Are they planning on any human trials ever involving schwann cells? NO they are not.

    OK they have a Lokomat. Where's the other $100 million?

    They will criticize any agressive work being done and when they finally can't keep the flood waters back anymore they will try to take credit for the work.

    To me they are a model for how not to do SCI research. They are, however, a model for how to raise funds. If you shut down their research and keep only the fundraising going we could really speed things up.

    I hope I'm wrong about them.

  10. #10
    Senior Member dogger's Avatar
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    Mike , i know nothing about the joint but from what i have read here they have some nice architecture !

    thank you
    dogger

    every day i wake up is a good one .

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