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Thread: Eat Organic

  1. #11
    That is so awesome! i wonder what elk tastes like? maybe with enough liqour it wont be so bad? LOl
    Last edited by nickelo; 01-26-2009 at 12:20 AM.

  2. #12
    I wish I could grow all my fruits. I don't eat fruits from the supermarket anyways.

  3. #13
    While eating organic is admirable we just can't afford it and there is not enough selection in our northern remote town.
    But we eat fresh vegetables from my moms garden all summer, make our own applesauce from my dads apples, pick and freeze sakatoon/huckleberries, make jam from our own raspberries and currants. We buy a cow from our neighbour (only fed organic grain but mostly grass fed), catch our own fish in the summer and are planning on raising chickens for meat/eggs this year. We already buy eggs fresh from our neighbour. And we trade our beef for a bit of moose/deer meat.
    I think there is a lot of how do I say it - branding maybe? about saying "I eat organic" when much of that organic food is trucked halfway across the continent.
    Plus I like my kids to see where their food comes from. My daughter grew lettuce, carrots and pumpkins herself this year.
    Emily, C-8 sensory incomplete mom to a 8 year old and a preschooler. TEN! years post.

  4. #14
    Senior Member TheAbleChef's Avatar
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    Well you are eating organic by growing your own fruits and vegetables, raising chickens and buying beef which was raised organically. My fiance's parents also raise cows and have a huge plot of land, and her mom loves to grow stuff as soon as the weather gets good.

    Quote Originally Posted by Emi2 View Post
    While eating organic is admirable we just can't afrd it and there is not enough selection in our northern remote town.
    But we eat fresh vegetables from my moms garden all summer, make our own applesauce from my dads apples, pick and freeze sakatoon/huckleberries, make jam from our own raspberries and currants. We buy a cow from our neighbour (only fed organic grain but mostly grass fed), catch our own fish in the summer and are planning on raising chickens for meat/eggs this year. We already buy eggs fresh from our neighbour. And we trade our beef for a bit of moose/deer meat.
    I think there is a lot of how do I say it - branding maybe? about saying "I eat organic" when much of that organic food is trucked halfway across the continent.
    Plus I like my kids to see where their food comes from. My daughter grew lettuce, carrots and pumpkins herself this year.
    Never Give Up!

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by TheAbleChef View Post

    My fiance's parents have been in farming for many generations and has alot of knowledge in cattle. This is what she told me...

    "In Canada no cattle may be slaughtered until the antibiotics have had time to work their way out of the system (a certain number of weeks). Hormones are not commonly used in traditional farming (factory farms are another story) and similar rules apply for slaughter. NO hormones are used in dairy cattle in Canada, it is against the law. Organic meat is another way to go if you are worried about contaminants. Try to stay away from meat purchased at large box stores (which is often treated to stay looking fresh). Instead, buy from local butchers - these mom and pop shops can often tell you exactly where the meat is from and know the farmers and their practices. Of course, go with what works for you! "
    Unfortunately, this won't happen here. The meat and dairy industries have a stranglehold on Washington. And yeah, Monsanto is pretty insideous.

    Monsanto’s Harvest of Fear

    Monsanto rose to prominence as one of the leading chemical giants of the twentieth century, but its focus today is agriculture. A company statement says, “At Monsanto, we apply innovation and technology to help farmers around the world be more successful, produce healthier foods, and better animal feeds, and create more fiber, all while reducing agriculture’s impact on the environment.”


    But critics have accused Monsanto of undermining local farmers and public health through a wide means of corporate bullying. The latest issue of Vanity Fair has a lengthy article profiling some of Monsanto’s controversial corporate practices, from patenting seeds to fighting warning labels on milk cartons. It’s called “Monsanto’s Harvest of Fear.”


    Vanity Fair contributing editor James Steele joins us here in our firehouse studio. He is the co-author of the piece, along with Donald Bartlett. And we welcome you to Democracy Now!, Jim.


    JAMES STEELE: Nice to be with you, Amy.


    AMY GOODMAN: Why did you look at Monsanto?


    JAMES STEELE: I think one of the reasons, it’s one of these companies that’s sort of below the radar screen to a lot of Americans at this point, and one of the things that fascinated us is the transformation of this company. I think a lot of people think of them for chemicals, fibers, all of those things that the name—that the company made its reputation on. But below that, in recent years, has been this remarkable revolution, where they are now an agricultural company, a life sciences company, and they want to completely put their chemical past behind them, in that sense, to concentrate on these new areas: genetically modified seeds and artificial supplements to increase milk production, and so forth. So it became just one of those interesting companies that people sort of know the name, but they don’t really know much about. That’s the kind of thing that’s always appealed to Don and me.


    AMY GOODMAN: Talk about Pilot Grove, Missouri.


    JAMES STEELE: Pilot Grove, Missouri is a little town right smack dab in the middle of Missouri, 750 people, in the midst of a very productive soybean growing area.


    By the way, I’m now Vanity Fair‘s resident expert on soybeans. I’m not sure exactly where I can go with this in the future, but I didn’t realize exactly how pivotal soybeans are to every aspect of our food supply, foods, you name it. And they’re an extremely important thing in terms of an export crop in this country.


    Pilot Grove is in the midst of one of these great soybean growing areas. And Monsanto has been targeting farmers and a seed co-op in that area over the last few years, accusing them of patent infringements. Monsanto, when they developed genetically modified seeds, patented the process. And unlike soybean seeds back to millennia, where farmers saved them, cleaned them over the winter and then replanted them in the spring, Monsanto prohibits that. You are to repurchase a new bag of seeds every spring and start the process over again. They claim this is necessary to justify the kind of money they invested to produce the genetically modified seed in the first place.


    But a lot of farmers don’t always know that. Sometimes conventional soybean seeds get mixed in with genetically modified seeds. They look exactly the same. There’s absolutely no difference. And as a result of that, when they suspect that somebody has infringed on their patent, they unleash their investigative corps and private investigators to look at farmers, seed dealers, and so forth.


    And that’s what happened in Pilot Grove, and it’s been going on for several years now. They’ve targeted many farmers there, and upwards of two dozen, the last time I looked at things, had settled with the company, had not gone to court, had just reached some confidential agreement.


    But the co-op, the seed co-op that is sort of the pivotal unit in that county, did not agree to a settlement. They felt, how in the world can we agree to this? We—farmers bring us seeds. We don’t know whether these are traditional seeds or whether these are genetically modified seeds. They’re basically saying, “You want us to be a policeman of our customers.” So they resisted, and they’re in court over this.


    But as a result of this, Monsanto has unleashed the full weight of its investigative forces in this little county. No less than seventeen surveillance videos by private investigators have been made of farmers in and around this town. I mean, this was eye-opening to us, the idea that a company is out there videotaping farmers, apparently, in their fields, coming out of stores. I’m not exactly sure where some of these videos were taken, but the court record refers to those. And these are part of the evidence that they gather to then confront farmers and say, “Look, you need to settle. You need to come clean. You’re infringing on our patent. It’s time to really make an agreement with us.”


    So—and it turns out, most cases that Monsanto gets involved in never get this far. When the farmers are faced with certain possibility of litigation, most simply settle. It’s easier. They don’t have the resources to fight, even if they think they’re innocent. And they go on about their business. But this is one of the exceptions, and this is why this case is so remarkable, because it lays out exactly the methods the company uses, and so forth. Other farmers have talked about this in many other parts of the country for absolutely—over the last few years, ever since these genetically modified seeds were introduced in the late ’90s...
    http://www.democracynow.org/2008/5/6...arvest_of_fear

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