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Thread: All right Gang, need your ideas.

  1. #1

    All right Gang, need your ideas.

    I am condo/house hunting and I am looking for input on what to have in the sales contract before going to attorney review. (Most contracts don't go through attorney review here but guess what? -Mine is!

    Today I saw a condo where almost nothing was plowed. In my contract offer
    I was going to included that from my living space, to my van, all snow be removed (insert reasonable time here, maybe 24 hours) or else I would hire a private contractor and that fee would be applied to the following month.

    Also, I would add that the shower floor would need to be lowered and made accessible.

    What other key points would you all want included and or to safeguard against
    within a sales contract?

    Thanks for any ideas.

    J.
    And the truth shall set you free.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    I don't want to be a bummer here, but the condo association or management should make sure the place is plowed period, not specially for you. I live in a condo and it is being cleaned even as it snows. Hiring a private contractor could be dicey legally since you do not own the common area, and if the plow person was to damage anything you might be libel.
    One thing that was very important to me was to have it written in my purchase and sale agreement that I was allowd my two cats in my unit.

  3. #3
    You should have seen it all. The parking lot was a mess.

    I have no pets but appreciate any and all tips and ideas that people
    might have included in the sales contract for self defense...
    And the truth shall set you free.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    last house on the left
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    I was sort of lucky because I made several demands in my P&S agreement. They had to widen the bathroom door to 36", which involved removing a small wall inside the bathroom. To do that they had to repaint the ceiling and put down fresh linoleum. I got them to do it for no extra charge. Does parking come with the place you are thinking of buying? Is it purchased or assigned? I bought a space in the garage on the end of the row so that I have room to deploy my ramp and no one can ever reassign my space because I own it. Just things to think about......

  5. #5
    They would have to lay down concrete for me and have a double van space in the back entrance. I cannot access the building from the front AT ALL!. (Every other unit already has this small cul da sac so I am not really asking them to do what they have in other buildings.)

    There is a master shower they they would have to lower the floor in so that it is barrier free.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eileen View Post
    I was sort of lucky because I made several demands in my P&S agreement. They had to widen the bathroom door to 36", which involved removing a small wall inside the bathroom. To do that they had to repaint the ceiling and put down fresh linoleum. I got them to do it for no extra charge. Does parking come with the place you are thinking of buying? Is it purchased or assigned? I bought a space in the garage on the end of the row so that I have room to deploy my ramp and no one can ever reassign my space because I own it. Just things to think about......
    And the truth shall set you free.

  6. #6
    There's two different parties you're negotiating with here -- the current owners of the unit and the condo owner's association. Items dealing with things within your unit (e.g. lowering the shower floor) can and should be covered in your sales agreement with the current owners, but you will need a separate contract/written agreement with the owners association for all of the items dealing with the common areas of the building and condo rules (like snow removal, permission to make accessibility modifications to your unit).

    As soon as you find a unit you like, get a copy of the handbook that the owner's association issues to every owner. This book discloses the current financial status of the owners' association, details about what are the common areas, and the rules by which each unit owner must abide. Most, if not all states, provide a period in which you can review this book and then back out of your offer penalty free if you find anything in the handbook that you cannot live with. (In VA, where I lived, the condo association was required to give you their current handbook only after you put in an offer, and then you had 72 hours after receiving it to review it all and withdraw your offer, penalty free, if you found problems.)

    Go over this handbook with a fine tooth comb to see what rules may impede your ability to make your unit and the common areas accessible. This is where to look for their policies on snow removal, making physical modifications to your unit (any construction typically requires approval of the association, pets, etc.) Once you've identified any policies that you may need to be modified, make a list. Some things you might want to include are requests for automatic approval of any unit modifications needed to make your unit meet your accessibility needs, permission to have a service animal, and assurances that your sole entry to the building will always be functional. You're going to want to get all of these items addressed in writing by the owners' association before finalizing the purchase agreement.

    In your sales contract with the unit owners, cover all physical changes to the unit that need to be made -- everything from repainting to bathroom modifications -- and include a clause that states that the sale of the unit is contingent upon getting approval from the owners' association for all of the items on your list. That will enlist the current owners to become advocates to the association on your behalf, which can help save you a lot of hours spent negotiating with the board directly.

    One note -- getting a parking space that works for you may not be within the power of the owners' association or the current owners. In my old building, the assigned parking space for each unit was legally attached to that unit as part and parcel of the property being purchased. This meant that the only people who could give me the parking spot I needed (the one right next to the building's ramp) were the legal owners of that spot. If the parking spaces at your building are legally attached to specific units and you need to have a specific space, you will need to negotiate directly with the owner of that space to work out a trade/lease/purchase agreement.

    Hope that is more helpful than confusing!

    --THC

  7. #7
    Sorry, forgot to mention brand new building, all new, never before owned by anyone.

    Thanks hip, I will request the HO handbook. (giggidy)
    And the truth shall set you free.

  8. #8
    [channeling Roseanne Roseannadanna]Oooh, well never mind.[/channeling] *giggle*

  9. #9
    I believe Eddie Murphy was Velvet Jones supporting his, "How to be a Ho!"
    And the truth shall set you free.

  10. #10
    I am sorry that I haven't any specific input but, as you prob. know... If it is not in writing, it does not mean shit. So you are wise to have a lawyer read your agreement and go through things w/ a fine tooth comb.

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