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Thread: How to increase serotonin in your brain?

  1. #1

    How to increase serotonin in your brain?

    Someday, serotonin will be called the happiness factor. When it is low, people are depressed. If it is kept high in the extracellular space by blocking serotonin uptake, it can bring people out of deep depression. So many of the drugs that people take (like cocaine) also increase serotonin in the brain. So, the question is how can one increase serotonin in one's brain without taking drugs.

    The following article tells you how to do it.

    http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/art...?artid=2077351
    J Psychiatry Neurosci. 2007 November; 32(6): 394–399.

    PMCID: PMC2077351
    Copyright © 2007 Canadian Medical Association
    How to increase serotonin in the human brain without drugs
    Simon N. Young
    Editor-in-chief, Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience, and Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, Que.

    For the last 4 decades, the question of how to manipulate the serotonergic system with drugs has been an important area of research in biological psychiatry, and this research has led to advances in the treatment of depression. Research on the association between various polymorphisms and depression supports the idea that serotonin plays a role, not only in the treatment of depression but also in susceptibility to depression and suicide. The research focus here has been on polymorphisms of the serotonin transporter, but other serotonin-related genes may also be involved.1–5 In the future, genetic research will make it possible to predict with increasing accuracy who is susceptible to depression. Much less attention has been given to how this information will be used for the benefit of individuals with a serotonin-related susceptibility to depression, and little evidence exists concerning strategies to prevent depression in those with such a susceptibility. Various studies have looked at early intervention in those with prodromal symptoms as well as at population strategies for preventing depression.6–11 Obviously, prevention is preferable to early intervention; moreover, although population strategies are important, they are ideally supplemented with preventive interventions that can be used over long periods of time in targeted individuals who do not yet exhibit even nonclinical symptoms. Clearly, pharmacologic approaches are not appropriate, and given the evidence for serotonin's role in the etiology and treatment of depression, nonpharmacologic methods of increasing serotonin are potential candidates to test for their ability to prevent depression.

    Another reason for pursuing nonpharmacologic methods of increasing serotonin arises from the increasing recognition that happiness and well-being are important, both as factors protecting against mental and physical disorders and in their own right.12–14 Conversely, negative moods are associated with negative outcomes. For example, the negative mood hostility is a risk factor for many disorders. For the sake of brevity, hostility is discussed here mainly in relation to one of the biggest sources of mortality, coronary heart disease (CHD). A meta-analysis of 45 studies demonstrated that hostility is a risk factor for CHD and for all-cause mortality.15 More recent research confirms this. Hostility is associated not only with the development of CHD but also with poorer survival in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients.16 Hostility may lead to decreased social support and social isolation,17 and low perceived social support is associated with greater mortality in those with CAD.18 Effects are not just limited to CHD. For example, the opposite of hostility, agreeableness, was a significant protective factor against mortality in a sample of older, frail participants.19
    The author mentions a couple of ways:
    • Mood induction
    • Bright light (sunlight)
    • Exercise
    • Food with high levels of tryptophan, i.e. α-Lactalbumin, chickpeas.

    Wise.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Arrow

    Very interesting published by other smart-cookie Young (btw He is from Montreal)

    Wonder why He didn't look into obvious correlation/ connection between production of Vitamin D (sunlight) and depression in North countries?

    Also sleep = light cycle for which melatonin is responsible. In other words why Symon Young did not look into obvious connection of levels of melatonin and /or Vitamin D in human brain and depression?

    Thanks Wise .

    Somehow I noticed (on myself)-that both melatonin and Vitamin D very helpful in beating seasonal depress.

  3. #3
    Thank you for your answeres, In my body I understood that when I dont see any sunlight I'm getting disorder. It is really true I was thinking I got addicted to sun-tanned but in reality my mood needed it. Thank you.

  4. #4
    Interesting Doc, I've always felt that exercise put me in a better mood, we all hear about runners high, I think there even is a connection with nuerogenic pain and mood therfore exercise and other things that increase serotonin.

  5. #5
    Senior Member ian's Avatar
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    serotonin levels also affect the functioning of the immune system in a big way.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Imight's Avatar
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    5-HTP pills. arent they just some root or seeds of some kind?

    Toyed with it back in the day.

    Bad thing about it, is it takes a very long time to go thru the metabolism process. I really never noticed a difference, just a little bit of 'calmness' kind of like a carefree vibe but very minimal and subtle.

  7. #7
    Senior Member ian's Avatar
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    Im also surprised the author does not mention meditation which has been proven to increase serotonin levels.

  8. #8
    Senior Member rdf's Avatar
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    Sunshine and exercise always does it for me.
    Please donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org.
    Copy and paste this message to the bottom of your signature.

    Thanks!

  9. #9
    So the answer is more egg whites? Who knew.
    And the truth shall set you free.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young View Post
    Someday, serotonin will be called the happiness factor. When it is low, people are depressed. If it is kept high in the extracellular space by blocking serotonin uptake, it can bring people out of deep depression. So many of the drugs that people take (like cocaine) also increase serotonin in the brain. So, the question is how can one increase serotonin in one's brain without taking drugs.

    The following article tells you how to do it.

    http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/art...?artid=2077351


    The author mentions a couple of ways:
    • Mood induction
    • Bright light (sunlight)
    • Exercise
    • Food with high levels of tryptophan, i.e. α-Lactalbumin, chickpeas.

    Wise.
    Great article Dr. Wise.

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