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Thread: LOOKING FOR THE RIGHT BED

  1. #1
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    LOOKING FOR THE RIGHT BED

    MY SON IS A NEWLY INJURED C5/C6 AND WE ARE LOOKING TO MAKE SURE WE GET THE RIGHT HOSPITAL BED FOR WHEN WE GET HOME.ANY THOUGHTS FROM ANYONE? ALSO WHAT KIND OF FURNITURE WOULD BE COMFORTABLE TO PUT TAYLOR IN? A LAZY BOY CHAIR? COUCH? ANY THOUGHTS WOULD BE APPRECIATED.

  2. #2
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    I just got a Volker bed for my brother, c5. He has had it a month or so now and it is great! It is made in Germany I think and made very well. Fairly stylish. Little bit wider than twin, but knit sheets work well. More expensive than some but I'm thinking it will last forever.

  3. #3
    I would find out about what kind of exchange policy does this vendor or hospital supply store have with their beds. Some places may be flexible and will come out and exchange the bed for a different one if there is a problem. Some vendors are slow to respond and they're not very flexible; so you want to make sure that you make the correct choice before it is delivered. I have no specific recommendation. Good luck.

    PN

  4. #4
    Senior Member Jeff's Avatar
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    The million dollar question is: "how functional is your son?" Does he have any use of triceps? Is he incomplete? With the smallest amount of triceps he can learn to transfer himself, which is a huge part of being independent. If that's the case then furniture that's easy to transfer in/out is paramount. If he doesn't get return of triceps then pressure relief is priority number 1. If he's getting a power chair then a reclining/standing chair would be really great. It is healthy for bones, joints, etc to stand and reclining can really relieve pressure and help avoid nasty decubitis ulcers that take forever to heal. If he's a mobile manual user then a recliner is not out of the question. But not a swivelling one as they are hard to transfer in/out. And it should not be cloth but something slippery like leather or faux leather. If he sits in it a lot then another special cushion would be warranted. For instance I have a rigid base Jay 2 cushion that I use for my wheelchair but I also have a Stimulite for the driver's seat of my car where I spend a lot of time. The Stimulite is great for surfaces that are not perfectly flat like a recliner or car seat. A Roho is great for this, too, but won't last as long as a Stimulite.

    I think more important than actual furniture will be some kind of exercise equipment. Depending on his very specific functional level he could achieve independence. I've heard of C4's who got so much return they could eventually be independent. So in the first few years focusing on nurturing any neurological recovery can be very important.

    And he'd probably trade his bed and couch for the ability to drive, too.

    Tell us more and maybe we can help more. Sorry your family has to face this. But you've come to where there are experts and those of us who have lived through it. We're here to help.

    ~See you at the SCIWire-used-to-be-paralyzed Reunion ~

  5. #5
    Senior Member darty's Avatar
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    Take it from me C5-C6 quad 24 years post injury a Pegasis alternating pressure mattress is the best if you can get it....

  6. #6
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    Thank u very much for your thoughts.Taylor has a flicker of triceps and hopefully will grow into them.In the meantime we take one day at a time.
    Originally posted by Jeff:

    The million dollar question is: "how functional is your son?" Does he have any use of triceps? Is he incomplete? With the smallest amount of triceps he can learn to transfer himself, which is a huge part of being independent. If that's the case then furniture that's easy to transfer in/out is paramount. If he doesn't get return of triceps then pressure relief is priority number 1. If he's getting a power chair then a reclining/standing chair would be really great. It is healthy for bones, joints, etc to stand and reclining can really relieve pressure and help avoid nasty decubitis ulcers that take forever to heal. If he's a mobile manual user then a recliner is not out of the question. But not a swivelling one as they are hard to transfer in/out. And it should not be cloth but something slippery like leather or faux leather. If he sits in it a lot then another special cushion would be warranted. For instance I have a rigid base Jay 2 cushion that I use for my wheelchair but I also have a Stimulite for the driver's seat of my car where I spend a lot of time. The Stimulite is great for surfaces that are not perfectly flat like a recliner or car seat. A Roho is great for this, too, but won't last as long as a Stimulite.

    I think more important than actual furniture will be some kind of exercise equipment. Depending on his very specific functional level he could achieve independence. I've heard of C4's who got so much return they could eventually be independent. So in the first few years focusing on nurturing any neurological recovery can be very important.

    And he'd probably trade his bed and couch for the ability to drive, too.

    Tell us more and maybe we can help more. Sorry your family has to face this. But you've come to where there are experts and those of us who have lived through it. We're here to help.

    ~See you at the SCIWire-used-to-be-paralyzed Reunion http://www.stopstart.fsnet.co.uk/smilie/wavey.gif ~

  7. #7
    I would be very cautious about putting him into a recliner chair. In the reclined position, there is excessive shear and pressure on the sacrum. Reclining in a tilt-in-space wheelchair is done to shift weight from the ischiums to the sacrum, but this should only be done for brief periods of time between sitting upright. I have seen some really bad pressure ulcers in people who sleep in a recliner instead of a bed.

    If he cannot turn himself, I would be inclined to look into a turning mattress such as the CairTurn RT (Triline/Wound Support Services) or the Span America Turn-Select. Neither is cheap, but they go on a standard hospital bed frame and are easy to use and assemble when moving.

    (KLD)

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