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Thread: "How bad R U from 1 to 10?" arrrrrrrgh!!!!

  1. #61
    Jon

    Have you had an indium-111 leukocyte scan or MRI of the surgical area?

  2. #62

    pain

    there is no getting used to the pain. everyday i wake up my pain is at least a 3 then when i get up and get moving it becomes a 6 and worsens throughtout the day. I just recently got put on oxycontin 20mg twice a day which barely helps. So i understand this number thing you guys speak of! what the hell is a number..when i go to the doc he says whats your pain level now. I say about a 8or9 out of 10. how the hell are you supposed to tell the pain your in by a fuckin number? it makes me soo mad and upset! These docs are assholes. I was on pain management for 5 yrs and the damn doc kept swithcing and switching meds every month. until finally the perc 10/325 worked for a while. thyen i was getting a hell of alot of breakthrough pain even on the percocets. Well i gotta go. I'll finish this letter later on, i feel better that i vented my frustration. Thank you for letting me vent, i really needed it.

  3. #63
    My situation is different from some here. Opiates have NO effect on me, so far as the neuropathic burning is concerned. This is a bit of a blessing, since I never have to ask a pain doctor for any opiates. This should propel me into credibility but it is outbalanced by my having to explain a bizarre mix of pains which characterizes my central pain. The safest method to gain credibility, is to sit calmly, politely, and cheerfully (the exact opposite of how a person in pain normally behaves) and then say the pain is really quite unbearable, and so I need some clonazepam to sedate me--it helps suppress the panic.

    I admit, this sounds stupid, but if you cry on someone's shoulder, you are almost certain to be relegated to drug seeker status, even if you are not seeking any drugs. Doctors are not yet educated about central pain. I have to wonder how much of this upside down situation is due to unafamliarity with central pain and how much is due to fear of the drug seeker. The law has an educating effect. Making anything illegal changes things. Anyone who represents the possible revocation of one's license can never really be sure the doctor thinks of him/her the same as other patients, or that the usual doctor/patient principles apply.

    We really need a method, however gross, to measure actual pain. It seems the history of what the pain has required us to give up, which would suffice in many illnesses, falls short of convincing. So good manners is always the best policy. I have to admit that doctors who have given me medications are taking a risk, and those who don't care to get into that are playing it safe. It is not hard to guess which group I admire, for my own sake. And I am glad opiates are never part of the equation. If they were, I am certain I would not have had access to some of the top experts who have deigned to treat me. My illness is problem enough for them.

    We have to remember the doctor is gambling his license and livelihood on every one of us. If we just happened to have gone to ten other docs for pain meds, he could be in trouble and it would be our fault. Therefore, he/she wants to feel we are not the type to do that to him/her. I think that is why it works best to speak positively about everything. That is the only thing I can figure.

    Drug seekers typically complain about the severity of the pain and are vague and emotional. Their story is too good. It is also too much like ordinary pain (nociceptive pain) to qualify as Centrall Pain.

    Neuropathic CP patients are usually wasted, worn out, lethargic, and talk about what they have lost. They don't press for drugs quite so hard because they know the benefit is not going to be overwhelming. This does not mean they are not suffering. Their pain story is poor. They either use ordinary terms for what is soon revealed to be very abnormal pain or use very unusual verbal descriptors for the pain, the end result of either path making the doctor nervous. Dejerine and Roussy indicated it was easy to spot an hysteric, and I think it is, for the expert. In some areas where drug abuse is rife, I imagine the docs spend a lot of time worrying about this very thing. CP patients have less pain perception than normal, so I suppose one way to test them is to slug them in the arm or something. A CP patient won't much mind--it doesn't burn. I have never had any doctor actually do this, but it is as rational a test as any other one I can think of. Laying an occlusive newspaper on the distal legs (light touch), now that is really painful after a while. Hysterics fail these tests.
    Last edited by dejerine; 01-21-2009 at 04:27 AM.

  4. #64
    Like most here, I too deal with severe chronic pain, which is impossible to rate on a scale of 1-10. However - if I were to try, when I first wake up in the morning, I would say my pain level is a 7-8. That's before I take my meds. After about an hour I would say maybe a 5-6, and that's usually what it stays at every day. Towards the evening, it tends to get worse. Everyone's "level" of pain is different though. What I can say, like everyone else here, is that the pain sucks the big one! And it's something we have to deal with all day, every day. I take a combo of meds that help, but never takes away the pain. It just allows me to function - and sometimes barely at that. It's something you never get used to, but over time I've learned to live with it. I've learned that "mind over matter" does help, taking my meds, and focus on something distracting. It doesn't always work, and I have plenty of days where I wish I could be put out of my misery; but I have a little boy that needs me. So, alot of times I look to him to keep myself going. It's tough, and I wish there was a way to make it just a little easier. Just a little bit of relief would make a big difference. I've dealt with pain for so long, I just can't remember what life is like to not have pain.
    Live Every Day Like It's Your Last!

    C3-C4 and T12-L1 since July 1988

  5. #65
    Senior Member alan's Avatar
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    These sensations can't be explained. I give a 3.5 page document to any health care person I deal with, and it doesn't include everything because I can't describe everything.
    Alan

    Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

  6. #66
    Quote Originally Posted by JerseyGirl View Post
    Like most here, I too deal with severe chronic pain, which is impossible to rate on a scale of 1-10. However - if I were to try, when I first wake up in the morning, I would say my pain level is a 7-8. That's before I take my meds. After about an hour I would say maybe a 5-6, and that's usually what it stays at every day. Towards the evening, it tends to get worse. Everyone's "level" of pain is different though. What I can say, like everyone else here, is that the pain sucks the big one! And it's something we have to deal with all day, every day. I take a combo of meds that help, but never takes away the pain. It just allows me to function - and sometimes barely at that. It's something you never get used to, but over time I've learned to live with it. I've learned that "mind over matter" does help, taking my meds, and focus on something distracting. It doesn't always work, and I have plenty of days where I wish I could be put out of my misery; but I have a little boy that needs me. So, alot of times I look to him to keep myself going. It's tough, and I wish there was a way to make it just a little easier. Just a little bit of relief would make a big difference. I've dealt with pain for so long, I just can't remember what life is like to not have pain.
    You describe my day so well, I could copy this post and put it with my drug list for my next doctor appointment on the 29th.

    Sounds to me though, and from the happy face of your son, you've got a pretty good attitude for life!

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