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Thread: 12/19/08 Dr. Phil show

  1. #11
    Senior Member skippy13's Avatar
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    At least they know what PTSD is now, not like it was for the Vietnam Era Vets that are still (35 years later or more) just now being diagnosed and rated.

  2. #12
    Senior Member skippy13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Type Français View Post
    This is only part of the reason I'm anti-war, the ones who fight are so often thrown by the wayside after they're used (that is if they didn't die).
    I know of very few vets that arent anti-war. We are just not anti military service. I know of very few who would not voluntarily serve all over again, or still be serving if they were able.

  3. #13
    Senior Member skippy13's Avatar
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    One resource gleaned from the show is an organization in Illinois designed to assist returning vets from that state. It is paid for by the State of Illinois and run by a wounded vet by the name of Ms. Tammy Duckworth. Ms Duckworth isa former helicopter pilot. Check out the site www.illinoiswarrior.com.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by skippy13 View Post
    It is far more confrontational than I thought it was going to be. Not everyone gets treated the way the guys on the show were treated.
    Great point, Skippy13. There's a danger in hasty generalization. VA is a nationwide healthcare system. In some states, some fields of medicine, some isolated incidences there are breakdowns. But people need to remember when things go right there's nothing to report. When things go wrong, the big issue stands alone with nothing positive to balance the story. For every negative story, Dr. Phil could've easily found a positive case to offer a balanced view of the VA. Otherwise, it's nothing more than sensationalism. ***Full disclosure-I didn't see the show myself. I'm simply responding to how it's being characterized in this forum***

    This is sort of what happened at Walter Reed, a DoD facility---not a VA hospital. But VA took the heat after fact became a casualty of sensationalism. For all the good I've witnessed occur at VA hospitals across the country, I've yet to see media, for example, highlight how superior SCI care is in the VA when compared with the private sector.

  5. #15
    Sensationalism, yes. But, as we know, that's how media-for-revenue works. The root message remains the same. And the multitudes of veterans rights groups support the message - they're not in it for the money. If one pursues a service and gets satisfactory results in that pursuit, there should be no story. Whenever the subject of universal healthcare is brought up, the VA system is cited as being far superior than the civilian sector, and what a UHC system should be modeled after.

    The complete show is on youtube, in 6 parts, starting here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xYBVBhR_Um8

    Sorry it won't embed.

    I'm not being a pessimist here, just see a need. Thanks for everything you and your cohorts do, Veteran Adviser.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Le Type Français View Post
    This is only part of the reason I'm anti-war, the ones who fight are so often thrown by the wayside after they're used (that is if they didn't die).
    Being anti-war is noble, but won't stop wars from happening.

    It is said that the character of a nation can be measured by the way that nation treats its veterans / The way a nation treats its veterans dictates how willing its people will be to fight for it. I tend to agree.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Veteran Advisor View Post
    ... For all the good I've witnessed occur at VA hospitals across the country, I've yet to see media, for example, highlight how superior SCI care is in the VA when compared with the private sector.
    Veteran Advisor. That is interesting. You mean that the care spinal cord injured get in the VA system is better than what is provided in the private sector? As I understand VA is government. Will this then mean that you have better fait in government provided care as such for SCI before/over private SCI care in general? Can I understand you that you are in favour of a government universal health care system? The government universal (or socialised) health care system has been up for debate for a long time in you’re country I also understand, also on the agenda on the new Obama admin. Can you elaborate more on your views on this matter? Tnx.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Leif View Post
    Veteran Advisor. That is interesting. You mean that the care spinal cord injured get in the VA system is better than what is provided in the private sector? As I understand VA is government. Will this then mean that you have better fait in government provided care as such for SCI before/over private SCI care in general? Can I understand you that you are in favour of a government universal health care system? The government universal (or socialised) health care system has been up for debate for a long time in you’re country I also understand, also on the agenda on the new Obama admin. Can you elaborate more on your views on this matter? Tnx.
    I am in favor of a VA health care system that takes care of veterans as promised. Extrapolating a preference for universal health care out of that is somewhat of a reach. I see how rehabilitative care is managed in both the private and VA sectors, and I base my opinion on the outcomes as well as the private sector patients who tell me themselves they wish they were in the VA system for SCI care.

    The difference between socialized health care and VA care is the latter is owed out of a promise to veterans since the days of Lincoln ("To care for him who shall have born the battle..."). VA care is exclusive, not inclusive. Socialized care is based on natural-born entitlement, a far cry from the sacrifice asked of veterans. The two simply don't compare, in my view. If your question presupposes that all forms of government-managed care can be considered socialized medicine then I disagree with your premise.

    Also bear in mind, my view is limited to those instances where I saw a juxstaposition of the two care systems. This does not mean that all of VA's 23 SCI Centers are far superior to all private sector SCI care facilities. I should've qualified my earlier assertion. My point was media need to provide balanced perspectives of VA, not just the negative.
    Last edited by Veteran Advisor; 12-20-2008 at 02:36 PM.

  9. #19
    Thank you for explaining that, Veteran Adviser, and I hate to chop your post up, but to address a couple points separately...
    The difference between socialized health care and VA care is the latter is owed out of a promise to veterans since the days of Lincoln ("To care for him who shall have born the battle..."). VA care is exclusive, not inclusive. Socialized care is based on natural-born entitlement, a far cry from the sacrifice asked of veterans. The two simply don't compare, in my view.
    Very well put. This has been a topic of debate here at CareCure, a national universal healthcare system based on the VA system. I haven't the answer to that, but understanding this difference is key to understanding the hurdles of such an idea.
    I see how rehabilitative care is managed in both the private and VA sectors, and I base my opinion on the outcomes as well as the private sector patients who tell me themselves they wish they were in the VA system for SCI care.
    My point was media need to provide balanced perspectives of VA, not just the negative.
    I agree, on both points. And even the "feel-good" stories that do make mainstream media don't really do the system justice.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by quadvet View Post
    It is said that the character of a nation can be measured by the way that nation treats its veterans / The way a nation treats its veterans dictates how willing its people will be to fight for it. I tend to agree.
    A nation that treats its veterans as disposable has little character and lacks the nobility it supposes.


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