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Thread: Researchers ID Suite of Genes in Aging Process

  1. #1

    Researchers ID Suite of Genes in Aging Process

    WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic biomarkers that are highly accurate in determining physiological age have been identified by researchers at California's Buck Institute for Age Research, who said it may be possible to use these biomarkers to test anti-aging drugs.

    The study, which included nematode worms, microarrays that measure changes in gene expression, and complex computer algorithms, was published in the Nov. 20 online edition of Aging Cell.





    http://news.yahoo.com/s/hsn/20081120...3w9g_ZtwmJhMgF
    Han: "We are all ready to win, just as we are born knowing only life. It is defeat that you must learn to prepare for"

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by jhope View Post
    WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic biomarkers that are highly accurate in determining physiological age have been identified by researchers at California's Buck Institute for Age Research, who said it may be possible to use these biomarkers to test anti-aging drugs.

    The study, which included nematode worms, microarrays that measure changes in gene expression, and complex computer algorithms, was published in the Nov. 20 online edition of Aging Cell.


    http://news.yahoo.com/s/hsn/20081120...3w9g_ZtwmJhMgF
    At Rutgers, we have an interesting collection of cells and genes from people who are over 100 years old. Called the centurion bank, this is a very interesting collection for those who want to study what genes make people live a long time.

    Wise.

  3. #3
    Senior Member rdf's Avatar
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    Drink heavy water and eat food partially from heavy water, it'll make the biomolecules that oxygen free radicals destroy as we age much sturdier and resistant to being damaged.

    Would eating heavy atoms lengthen our lives?
    The basic concept of the isotope effect is that the presence of heavy isotopes in a molecule can slow down its chemical reactions.

    This is because heavy isotopes form stronger covalent bonds than their lighter counterparts; for example, a carbon-deuterium bond is stronger than a carbon-hydrogen bond. While the effect applies to all heavy isotopes, including carbon-13, nitrogen-15 and oxygen-18 (see chart), it is most marked with deuterium as it is proportionally so much heavier than hydrogen. Deuterated bonds can be up to 80 times stronger than those containing hydrogen.

    All of this is conventional chemistry: the isotope effect was discovered back in the 1930s and its mechanism explained in the 1940s. The effect has a long pedigree as a research tool in basic chemistry for probing the mechanisms of complex reactions.

    Shchepinov, however, is the first researcher to link the effect with ageing. It dawned on him that if ageing is caused by free radicals trashing covalent bonds, and if those same bonds can be strengthened using the isotope effect, why not use it to make vulnerable biomolecules more resistant to attack? All you would have to do is judiciously place deuterium or carbon-13 in the bonds that are most vulnerable to attack, and chemistry should take care of the rest.
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  4. #4
    01.06.06
    Aging Gene



    RealmediaThere may be no need to search for the fountain of youth. A new animal study shows it may be inside of us, in the form of a gene that prolongs the lifespan of mice. This ScienCentral News video has more.
    Age Busting Gene
    Methuselah is said to have hit 969, Jared 962 and Noah over 500. We're not talking career home runs here, but biblical-era birthdays. Since no one's matched these records to date, most of us have more modest numbers in mind when we think about living a long, healthy life.
    "Eighty-five… that's a good number to me," says Gregoire Boisrond, a 33-year-old technician in New York City.
    Floridian Liz Whiteside, a mere toddler on the longevity scale at 24, has higher aspirations: "Heck, I'd live to 120 if I could do it."
    We all hope to have healthy golden years.
    image: The Osteoporosis FoundationAs scientists slowly pick apart the biological mechanisms that cause us to age, the future could see more of us winding up closer to Liz's ideal. Fresh evidence from an animal study shows how a gene called "klotho" — named for the Greek goddess who spins the thread of life — acts like a natural anti-aging hormone in genetically engineered mice.
    Han: "We are all ready to win, just as we are born knowing only life. It is defeat that you must learn to prepare for"

  5. #5
    Anti-Aging Gene

    Most of us think aging is inevitable. But one scientist has committed her career to proving us wrong. As this ScienCentral News video reports, genetics research could lead to anti-aging drugs.


    http://www.sciencentral.com/articles...e_id=218392210
    Han: "We are all ready to win, just as we are born knowing only life. It is defeat that you must learn to prepare for"

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